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the necessities of the case, been applied partly to the repair of decay. ing dikes and partly to dredging. At that date the dikes provided for in the project of improvement, so far as built, had resulted in securing a channel depth of 10 feet nearly all the way from New Baltimore to Albany, and of 8 feet nearly all the way from Albany to Troy. The shoal spots make the navigable depths on those parts of the river 94 feet and 74 feet, respectively.

The amount expended during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, inclusive of outstanding liabilities, was $96,962.43, and was applied to the repairs of the dikes; to the construction of new dikes; to dredging at Fish House, Bogart Light, Winnies, and Washington bars; to the removal of Dettingers Rock, opposite Van Wies Point; to the partial removal of the Overslaugh Rock, above Van Wies Point, and to the removal of wrecks from navigable channel under improvement.

The river and harbor act approved September 19, 1890, provides as follows:

That the Secretary of War is authorized and directed to appoint a board of three officers of the Corps of Engineers, United States Army, whose duty it will be to thoroughly examine the obstructions to navigation in the Hudson River, between New York City and the State dam at Troy, New York, and report a project and estiDate of the cost of widening and deepening said river between New York City and the city of Albany, and also between New York City and the State dam at the city of Troy for the navigation of sea-going vessels drawing twenty feet of water, and also a separate estimate of the expense of improving the river between Coxsackie and the State dam at Troy, to such an extent as to secure a navigable channel twelve feet deep at mean low water. Said board shall accompany their report with a statement as to the usefulness of such improvements and of their relations and value to commerce, and of the advisability of entering upon the same at this time; and the Secretary of War shall transmit said reports to Congress with his own views and those of the Chief of Engineers, United States Army, thereon; and the expenses of said board shall be paid out of the appropriation made in this act for the improvement of the Hudson River, not to exceed ten thousand dollars.

The Board of Engineers, authorized and directed by the above law, completed the duty assigned it, and its report, dated October 1, 1891, which was concurred in by the Chief of Engineers and the Secretary of War, was transmitted to Congress and printed as House Ex. Doc. No. 23, Fifty-second Congress, first session. A copy is also herewith submitted, accompanying annual report of the officer in charge upon the improvement of Hudson River (Appendix E 1).

Three propositions looking to improvement of the navigation of the river were by the terms of the act to be considered by the Board and projects, with estimates of cost, required to be submitted.

(i) Between New York City and the city of Albany, for the navigation of seagoing vessels drawing 20 feet of water.

(2) Between New York City and the State dam at Troy, for the navi. gation of seagoing vessels drawing 20 feet of water.

(3) Between Coxsackie and the State dam at Troy, for navigable channel 12 feet deep at mean low water.

Upon these three several propositions the Board, after full and careful consideration, remarks as follows:

Concerning the first two_deep channels between New York City and Albany and between New York City and Troy

The Board is of the opinion that the possible benefits to commerce to be derived from the proposed improvement for vessels drawing 20 feet are not, under existing conditions, sufficient to justify at this time the expenditure necessary to make such improvement.

The estimates of cost of carrying out the two projects contained in the said act, which provide for widening and deepening the channels between New York City

and the city of Albany and between New York City and the city of Troy for the navigation of seagoing vessels drawing 20 feet of water, are $5,934,847.60 and $19,507,832.74, respectively.

Concerning the third-channel 12 feet deep between Coxsackie and the State dam at Troy

After carefully studying the wants of commerce, the Board is of the opinion that the third project contained in the act of September 19, 1890, which provides for improving the Hudson River “between Coxsackie and the State dam at Troy to such an extent as to secure a navigable channel 12 feet deep at mean low water," is a worthy and useful one, and accordingly recommends it for adoption.

*

In view of the necessities of the commerce incident to the river proper and its tributary country, the Board is of the opinion that the project for improvement adopted in 1867 should be extended so as to provide for a channel depth of at least 12 feet at mean low water, and that such an extension is well worth the expenditure required for its execution.

The estimate submitted by the Board for a channel 12 feet deep and 400 feet wide from Coxsackie to the foot of Broadway, Troy, and thence 12 feet deep and 300 feet wide to the State dam at Troy, is $2,447,906.56. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended...:

$128, 342. 71 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

87, 228.98 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended.

41, 113. 73 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities

$9, 733. 45 July 1, 1892, amount covered by uncompleted contracts....

11, 246. 75

20, 980. 20 July 1, 1892, balance available

20, 133, 53 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892.

187,500.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893.

207, 633. 53 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project... 2, 260, 406.00 Amonnt that can be protitably expended in fiscal year ending June 30, 1894

500,000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix E 1.)

2. Harbor at Saugerties, New York.- This harbor is formed by the mouth of Esopus Creek, which empties into the Hudson River, on the west bank, about 100 miles above New York City.

The bar at the entrance at the time of original examination, made in November, 1883, with the view of preparing estimates for improvement, had a navigable depth of 3 feet only at mean low water, and the distance between the 6-foot curves across it was 1,100 feet. The har. bor could therefore be entered only at high water even by the smallest class of vessels. The range of tides is 4 feet, approximately.

The plan of improvement which was adopted in 1887 provided for securing a depth of 8 feet, mean low water, from the entrance to the head of navigation, 14 miles, by the construction of two parallel dikes, each 2,300 feet long, 260 feet apart on the inside and 280 feet apart on the outside, and by dredging, if found necessary, 30,000 cubic yards of material from the channel between the dikes.

The estimated cost of the improvement was $52,000; the amount expended upon the project up to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, inclusive of outstanding liabilities, was $36,299.11. At that date the south dike had been completed, and its length was 2,3631 feet; the north dike had been completed for a length of 809 feet, and the shoal in front of Sheffield's paper mill had been dredged to afford a channel 50 feet wide and 7 to 8 feet deep, mean low water. The chan.

nel across the bar was 200 wide and 9 feet deep, mean low water, and work on the north dike extension was in progress.

The amount expended during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, inclusive of outstanding liabilities, was $7,085,30, and was applied toward the completion of 1,250 feet of pile dike on the north side of the creek.

The existing navigable depth from the entrance to the head of navigation is 9 feet, mean low water, in a channel from 100 to 300 feet wide. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended..

$7, 678.24 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

7,085,30 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended....

592.94 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

5,000.00

Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893.

5, 592. 94

5,000.00

S Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project
Submitted in compliance with the requirements of sections 2 of river

and barbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix E 2.)

3. Harbor at Rondout, New York.-This harbor is formed by the mouth of Rondout Creek, which empties into the Hudson River on its west side about 90 miles above the city of New York, and is the eastern terminus of the Delaware and Hudson Canal. The creek is a tidal stream for 3 miles above its moutlı, and prior to 1871 all improvements had been made by private parties. The range of tides is 4 feet, approximately.

The Government made a survey of the harbor in 1869, and the available depth of water then in the channel was only 7 feet at mean low water. The project of improvement, based on this survey, was for the formation and maintenance of a channel 100 feet wide and 14 feet deep, mean low water, at the mouth of the creek, to be obtained by means of dikes and dredging. The parallel channel dikes, 350 feet apart at the entrance, were to be built outward into the Hudson River, and a branch dike upstream, starting at outer end of north pier, to protect the north dike against destruction by ice.

The estimated cost of the project was $172,500.

The project was completed in 1880 at an actual cost of $90,000 only. At that time the length of the north dike was 2,200 feet, and that of the south dike 2,800 feet, and there was a channel between them 50 feet wide and 13} feet deep, mean low water, and 100 feet wide and 12 feet deep, mean low water.

The appropriations which have been made since 1880 have been applied exclusively to the repair of the dikes,

The amount expended upon the project and upon repairs up to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, was $101,500, at which date the navigable channel was 100 feet wide and from 121 to 131 feet deep, niean low water. The dikes were built originally of timber and stone to the height of mean high water, but the timber has since be. come so damaged by age and by the ice that the stone filling in many places has fallen out between the rows of piles, and the height of the dikes has been correspondingly lowered.

The amount expended during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, inclusive of outstanding liabilities, was $5,000, and was applied in re pairing the north and branch dikes by replacing worn and decayed tim ber and refilling with stone. The dikes are now in fair condition, except that the south dike requires some additional stone filling.

July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$5,000.00 Jume 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

5,000.00 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

5, 000.00 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project......

15,000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix E 3.)

4. Wappinger Creek, New York.-Wappinger Creek is a small stream which empties into the Hudson River on left bank, one-half mile below the village of New. Hamburg, N. Y. The navigable portion, extending from the mouth to Wappinger Falls, is 2 miles long approximately, and before improvement afforded navigation to small boats drawing not exceeding 6 feet in a water way which had a width varying from 25 feet to 75 feet. The range of tides at entrance is 4 feet approximately.

The project for its improvement contained in the report upon the survey November 11, 1889, to comply with the river and harbor act, August 11, 1888, contemplates a channel 80 feet wide and 8 feet deep from the mouth to the falls. The estimated cost of the improvement was $13,000. The amount appropriated by the river and harbor act of September 19, 1890, was $13,000.

The amount expended up to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, inclusive of outstanding liabilities, was $80.33.

The amount expended during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, inclusive of outstanding liabilities, was $12.756.82.

The project was completed April 30, 1892.

There is now a navigable chaunel from the entrance to the Falls with a least width of 80 feet and a least depth of 8 feet, mean low water. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended...

$12, 919. 67 June 30, 1892, amount unexpended during fiscal year.

12, 756. 82 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended.....

162. 85 (See Appendix E 4.)

5. Harlem River, New York.- The Harlem River and Spuyten Duyvil Creek are both included in this improvement.

Originally there was no navigable water way between the two streams, as the bed of the connecting reach at Kingsbridge was a long reef of solid rock, bare at low water. The head of navigation at low tide in the Harlem River was practically at High Bridge, 5 miles from its junction with the East River at Hell Gate, for vessels of 7 feet draft, and, at high tide, in Spuyten Duyvil Creek, near Kingsbridge, 14 miles from the Hudson, for vessels of 8 feet draft.

The object of the improvement is to form a navigable channel between the East and Hudson rivers.

The project for the improvement as originally adopted in 1875 was for a channel 350 feet wide and 15 feet deep at mean low water. In 1879 the project was so far modified as to increase the width of the channel in the Harlem River and Spuyten Duyvil Creek to 400 feet, retaining the original width of 350 feet through Dyckman Meadow, but increasing the depth there to 18 feet, mean low water. This project was revised in 1886 by narrowing the channel immediately north of High Bridge, where it skirts the Ogden estate on the east bank, to a least width of 375 feet.

The estimated cost of the work was $2,700,000; the amount expended upon the improvement up to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, inclusive of outstanding liabilities, was $448,696.28. At that

date the excavation of the section of canal prism lying to the west of old Kingsbridge road had been carried down to grade over au area of 203,575 square feet, completing the section of cut to be excavated under the contract of December 15, 1887, with the exception of a core of rock left standing in the center of the excavation for temporary use as a roadway, and a spur of rock in the southwest end over which the tramway for transporting the broken stone to the dumping ground passed. Both these ledges covered an area of 42,000 square feet, and were in process of removal. The old Kingsbridge road, where it crossed the canal, had been closed, and the material composing it excavated down to the underlying rock surface, and a temporary roadway over the east dam had been opened to public traffic. The earth, turf, and meadow sod between the east dam and the westerly limit of the contract of August 12, 1889, had been nearly all excavated down to grade, and the rock excavation begun and grade reached over an area of 600 square feet.

Nearly all the rock to be removed under the contract of March 9, 1891, had been stripped of earth, and the excavation in the rock had been carried down to grade over an area of 1,400 square feet. The dredging in the Harlem River began near Fordham footbridge, and had been carried northward toward Kingsbridge in a water way 600 feet long, 75 to 150 feet wide, and 9 feet deep at mean low water. The contract for work west of west dam was not begun.

The amount expended during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, inclusive of outstanding liabilities, was $190,421.14. At that date the excavation of the section of canal prism lying between the two dams had been carried down to grade over an area of 285,000 square feet, leaving an area of only 65,000 square feet, over which the rock remains to be excavated in order to complete the cut between the dams, and a large portion of this rock had already been reduced to within a few feet of grade. A total of 625 linear feet of stone revetment wall, and 190 linear feet of timber revetment had been built to protect the side slopes of the canal chamber where necessary, to prevent the loose rock and earth arising from degradation of the slopes from falling into the cut after the canal has been opened to navigation. In the Harlem River a channel 9 feet deep, mean low water, and about 150 feet wide had been dredged from a point 900 feet north of Fordham footbridge, where it connects with the natural channel, to within 200 feet of the east dam. In Spuyten Duyvil Creek the channel near the Hudson River railroad drawbridge had been widened to about 65 feet, with a depth of 8 feet, mean low water, the channel over the bar at the rolling mill deepened to 8 feet, mean low water, the point of meadow opposite the Government dock cut off so as to widen the channel at this point to 240 feet, and Dyckman Creek and the meadow in front of the west dam had been excavated to nearly the full projected width and depth to within 100 feet of the west dam. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended....

$342, 298.95 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

152, 161. 66 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended....

190, 137.29 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities..

$38, 259.48 July 1, 1892, amount covered by uncompleted contracts 1 12, 204.41

180, 463.89 July 1, 1892, balance available

9, 673. 40 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

175,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893.

181, 673. 40

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