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Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project...... $281, 400.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix E 9.)

10. New York Harbor, New York.-Before the improvement of the main entrance into New York Harbor was undertaken by the United States, the least depth in mid-channel on the bar was 23.7 feet at mean low water, and the same was the limiting depth across three other shoals between the bar and deep water in the harbor.

A large proportion of the vast commerce of the port which is carried on in vessels of great draft could only cross these shoals at or near high water.

The project for the improvement of Gedney Channel was approved by the Secretary of War in December, 1884, and its extension to cover the whole of the main entrance to the harbor received his approval December 27, 1886. It provides for dredging a channel 1,000 feet wide and 30 feet deep at mean low water, from deep water below the Narrows through the Main Ship Channel and Gedney Channel to deep water outside the bar; maintaining this channel, should it be necessary, either by periodical dredging or by contracting the entrance by the construction of a dike running across the shoals from the Coney Island side, with suitable protection for the head of Sandy Hook to prevent its being scoured away by the increased current.

The estimated cost of obtaining the dredged channel was $1,490,000 for dredging 4,300,000 cubic yards, and the entire cost of the improvement should the contraction works prove to be necessáry was estimated at between $5,000,000 and $6,000,000.

Under this project an extended survey of the lower bay was made, on which the method of improvement was based.

The total amount expended to June 30, 1891, inclusive of outstanding liabilities, was $1,406,188.89.

At that time Gedney Channel and Bayside Channel (east and west) were practically completed, having a depth of 30 feet, mean low water, for the full projected width of 1,000 feet.

The Main Ship Channel from Buoy No. 10 north to Buoy No. 12 had then a depth of 30 feet, mean low water, for a width varying from 500 to 800 feet, and a depth of 28 feet for a width of 1,000 feet throughout. From Buoy No. 12 northward to deep water below the Narrows there was then a 30-foot channel not previously improvedl, 400 feet wide, and a 28-foot 1,000 feet wide. The 30-foot channel had a least width of 400 feet from deep water below Buoy No. 10, Lower Bay, to deep water below the Narrows, a distance of 22,000 feet, and there was a 28-foot channel, 1,000 feet wide, throughout the entire length of this reach,

The riprap sea wall authorized by the Chief of Engineers February 20, 1890, for the protection of the north shore of Sandy Hook was built from a point 375 feet east of Jetty No. 4, westward to a point 200 feet west of Jetty No. 10, a total distance of 2,375 feet.

The amount expended during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, inclusive of outstanding liabilities, was $95,375.95. The contract with The Joseph Edwards Dredging Company, dated February 16, 1891, for the removal of 500,000 cubic yards of material was completed October 10, 1891. During the fiscal year there was removed 213,268 cubic yards from the Main Ship Channel from Buoy No. 12 (Southwest Spit) northward to deep water below the Narrows, nearly opposite Buoy No. 11, and the channel at the time work was suspended, October 10, 1891, Jari a width of 1,000 feet and a depth of 30 feet, mean low water, from

deep water below the Narrows to deep water beyond the bar. 'Detailed surveys of all the improved channels were made during November and December, 1891, and January, 1892, and the results showed that the improved depths have been maintained without appreciable deterioration.

Baxter Ledge, a narrow ledge of rock lying in the entrance to Kill van Kull from Upper New York Bay, northeast from St. George, Staten Island, and having over it originally a least depth of 18 feet, mean low water, was successfully removed to 25.5 feet, mean low water, using the United States plant connected with the East River and Hell Gate improvement.

Under the contract with John Satterlee, dated March 26, 1891, 3,110 tons of large stone were delivered and placed in position in the riprap sea wall for the protection of the north shore of Sandy Hook. This wall is now 2,575 feet long, extending from Jetty No. 1 westward to a point 119 feet westward of Jetty No. 11, uly 1, 1891, balance unex ded

. $120, 116.57 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year

93, 572.22 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

26, 544. 35 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities

1, 803. 73 July 1, 1892, balance available.....

24, 740. 62 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

170,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893

194, 740.62 (See Appendix E 10.) 11. Raritan Bay, New Jersey.-Raritan Bay forms the western part of the large triangular bay inclosed between Sandy Hook, the New Jersey shore, and Staten Island.

The channel undergoing improvement lies to the southeast of Seguine Point on the south shore of Staten Island. At the time of the original survey, August, 1880, the least depth on the shoal lying between the 21.foot curve at Seguine Point and the 21-foot curve at the head of the bay was 141 feet, mean low water. The project of improvement, based upon the survey, provided for a channel across the shoal 300 feet wide and 21 feet deep, mean low water, at an estimated cost of $126,500.

The project was enlarged in 1885, providing for a channel of equal width and depth over the shoals in the vicinity of Ward Point, Staten Island, where the original depth was 18 feet, mean low water, giving a navigable channel 21 feet deep, mean low water, up to Perth Amboy; and further providing for a channel 300 feet wide and 15 feet deep, mean low water, from Great Beds Light to South Amboy, where the original depth was 124 feet, mean low water, at an estimated total cost of $240,500, for the two works from the beginning, which estimate was again increased in 1888 to $246,500, to provide for the removal of deposits which had taken place in the interval of three years.

The channel from deep water at the head of Raritan Bay past Seguine Point to Perth Amboy exceeds 5 miles in length, is crooked, anà is subject to constant shoalings. As the amount appropriated any one year for the execution of the project has been much less than the estimated cost of the improvement, and as the channel excavated under each appropriation has been impaired by shoaling in a greater or less degree before work could be resumed under the succeeding appropriations, the original estimates for this improvement have little value and can not be used for determining the amount required for completing the project at this date. The cost of completing the project, if all the

required money could be made available at one time, was estimated in 1891 at $175,375.

The amount expended upon the modified project of 1885 up to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, inclusive of outstanding liabilities, was $197,680.02. At the close of the contract, June 15, 1888, the channel was 300 feet wide and 21 feet deep, mean low water, from Perth Amboy to the bend at Great Beds Light, and 300 feet wide and 20 feet deep, mean low water, across the crest of the shoal in the channel leading from the bend toward Seguine Point. At the close of the year the channel eastward of Seguine Point was 100 feet wide, with a depth of 21 feet, mean low water, and the channel from Great Beds Light to South Amboy was 170 feet wide and 15 feet deep, mean low water.

The amount expended during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, inclusive of outstanding liabilities, was $30,827.09, and was applied in dredging 8,095 cubic yards of material from the channel leading from Great Beds Light to South Amboy, N. J., and 106,195 cubic yards of material from the Seguine Point Channel.

When work was suspended on exhaustion of appropriation, September 24, 1891, the channel leading eastward from Seguine Point was 180 feet wide and 21 feet deep, mean low water, and the channel from Great Beds Light to South Amboy was 170 feet wide and 15 feet deep, mean low water. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$32, 050.24 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year..

30, 754, 28 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended

1, 295. 96 July 1, 1892, outstanding liabilities

72.81 July 1, 1892, balance available.....

1, 223. 15 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892.

40,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893 ....

41, 223. 15 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project....... 95, 375.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix E 11.)

12. Removing sunken vessels or craft obstructing or endangering navigation.—The wreck of an old canal boat was removed from Gravesend Bay, Lower New York Harbor, August 12, 1891, under contract with Mr. John F. Baxter, at a cost of $144.

The wreck of a canal boat was removed from Raritan Bay, near South Amboy, N. J., February 1, 1892, under contract with the Chapman Derrick and Wrecking Company, at a cost of $199.

(See Appendix E 12.)

EXAMINATION AND SURVEY, MADE IN COMPLIANCE WITH PROVISIONS

OF RIVER AND HARBOR ACT APPROVED SEPTEMBER 19, 1890. The required preliminary examination for canal from main channel from Jamaica Bay easterly to Long Beach Inlet, New York, was made by the local engineer in charge, Lieut. Col. Gillespie, and report thereon submitted. It is his opinion, based upon the facts and reasons given, that only the western portion of the water way mentioned in the act is worthy of improvement. This opinion being concurred in by me, Lieut. Col. Gillespie was charged with and has completed survey of this portion of the water way (being the castern part of Jamaica Bay) and submitted report thereon.

ENG 92_7

The improvement proposed contemplates the excavation of a navigable water way, 60 feet wide and 5 feet deep at mean low water, from Beach Channel to some point on the eastern shore of Jamaica Bay. Three routes, with estimates, are submitted, as follows: 1. From Beach Channel, through Conch Hole, to Citizens Cut, at Far Rockaway

$21, 406 2. From Beach Channel, through Bass Channel, to Citizens Cut, at Far Rockaway

18, 920 3. From Beach Channel, through Bass Channel, to eastern shore of Jamaica Bay, near foot of Bayswater avenue.

9, 460 In connection with the Conch Hole route, Lieut. Col. Gillespie states: If an appropriation be made for making an artificial water way through the eastern part of Jamaica Bay along the Conch Hole route, the act should provide that the money shall not become available until after the right of way over such parts as lie above high water shall have been ceded to the Government free of charge.

The reports were transmitted to Congress and printed as House Ex. Doc. No. 29, Fifty-second Congress, first session. (See also Appendix

E 13.)

IMPROVEMENT OF RIVERS AND HARBORS ON SOUTHWESTERN SHORE

OF LONG ISLAND AND NEAR STATEN ISLAND, NEW YORK, AND IN NORTHEASTERN NEW JERSEY.

Officer in charge, Capt. Thomas L. Casey, Corps of Engineers; division engineer, Col. Henry L. Abbot, Corps of Engineers.

1. Sumpawanus Inlet, New York.-The channel depth at the time of the adoption of the project varied from 5 feet in the bay at mean low water to 2 feet at the wharf at the mouth of the creek, a distance of a little over half a mile.

The project for the improvement of this inlet, known locally as Sumpawams Creek, adopted in 1880, provided for dredging a channel about 4,500 feet long and from 100 to 150 feet wide and 5 feet deep at inean low water, beginning at the 5-foot curve in the Great South Bay and extending up to the town of Babylon, Long Island.

The amount expended under this project to June 30, 1891, was $7,000.

With this amount a channel 75 feet wide and 5 feet deep from the steamboat wharf to a point 750 feet below it was dredged, besides dredg. ing two cuts, each 25 feet wide, alongside the wharf.

Outside of the cuts so made and extending to the 5-foot curve in the bay a shoal was left, on which the depth was only 47 feet.

An examination made in 1886 showed that since the last dredging was done, in 1883, both the cut and the flat outside liad shoaled from 6 inches to '1 foot, the depth in the cut being about 5 feet, while on the flat it was from 4 to 4.4 feet. The 5-foot curve in the bay was about 1,500 feet from the steamboat wharf, but inside this curve, for about 750 feet towards the wharf, lay the flat.

The commerce of the inlet is reported for the calendar year 1891 to be 1,427 tons, against 1,278 tons for 1890. The passenger traffic to Fire Island Beach during the past year is stated to be in excess of that reported for 1890, viz, 10,000.

There were no expenditures on account of this work during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, there being no funds available.

Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project .... $16, 115.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sectious 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix F 1.)

2. Cunarsie Buy, New York.-The original coudition of the channel leading to Canarsie auswered to a depth of 44 feet, mean low water.

The original project, adopted in 1879, provides for obtaining a navi. gable chamel 6 feet deep at mean low water from Canarsie Landing to the deep water in Jamaica Bay by ineans of diking and the formation of a tidal basin. In the Annual Report of the Chief of Engineers, 1880, Part I, page 574, Gen. Newton expressed a doubt as to adequate appropriations being made for carrying out the authorized project and suggested that dredging be tried as an expedient.

The amount expended to the close of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, was $42,688.36.

With this amount two pile dikes have been built, one on the north side of the outer end of the channel, the other on the soutlı side, their lengths being 1,058 feet and 820 feet, respectively; the channel dredged to a depth of 6 feet, mean low water, and width of from 50 to 125 feet from Canarsie Landing to deep water in Jamaica Bay, besides several minor improvements not contemplated in the original project.

The expenditures during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1892, amount to $5,255,77.

With this amount the channel was increased in width by 50 feet for a distance of 1,950 feet from the landing at Canarsie, one cut being dredged from each side; two cuts were also taken from the south side of the channel, extending for a distance of 600 feet from the outer end of the north dike, and a single cut 180 feet in length along the side of the dock at Canarsie Landing, and necessary repairs were made to the north dike. The main channel has now a width of 100 to 150 feet, with a minimum depth of 6 feet, mean low water, from Canarsie Landing to the deep water in Jamaica Bay.

The commerce of Canarsie Bay is reported fo he calendar year 1891 to be 56,210 tons, against 50,898 tons reported for 1890. July 1, 1891, balance unexpended

$5, 311. 61 June 30, 1892, amount expended during fiscal year.

5, 255, 77 July 1, 1892, balance unexpended.

55. 87 Amount appropriated by act approved July 13, 1892

5,000.00 Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1893.

5, 055. 87 Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project.. 35, 000.00 Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and

harbor acts of 1866 and 1867. (See Appendix F 2.)

3. Sheepshead Bay, New York.-The original condition of the navigable channel was, for the entrance, a depth of a little over 2 feet at mean low water, and for the interior channel not less than 4 feet, except at two narrow bulkheads across said channel.

The originally adopted project (1879) was to deepen the entrance by means of converging jetties and to improve the interior channel by longitudinal dikes, so placed as in some instances to form tidal reser. voirs for the scour of the channel. The project was revised in 1881 and provides for excavating a channel at the outlet 100 feet wide and 6 feet deep at mean low water, to comect the bay with Dead Horse Inlet, and to dredge the interior channel; this was modified in February, 1889, the modified project contemplating a channel 5,350 feet long, 60 feet wide, and 51 feet deep, mean low water, from the town of Sheepshead to within 1,080 feet of Dead Torse Inlet Cut, to connect with the channel of similar width and depth already existing at that point.

The amount expended on this project to the end of the fiscal year ending June 30, 1891, was $25,784,20,

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