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in some obscure part of the Metropolis. He finds one room, eighteen feet by ten, swarming with a dense crowd of human beings. Shall we say that ten sleep alive in it? or twenty? or thirty? This would be a fact shocking enough to our feelings. But here he finds that 58 human beings—27 grown-up persons, and 31 children, constantly reside. Or let us take another instance. He mentions 15 ragged schools, at which, on an average, 2,345 persons attend. Of these 162 had been in prison several times, 116 had run away from home, 170 slept in lodging-houses—a specimen of which we have just given—253 lived by begging, 216 had no shoes or stockings, 280 no caps, hats, or bonnets, 101 no linen, 249 never slept in a bed.

The proposition of the noble lord was that Government should give facilities to this class for emigrating—that a thousand should be selected every year from the most industrious and deserving in the ragged schools—a free passage given them, and other advantages on landing in the Colonies. Sir George Grey, on the part of the Government, promised that he would give the subject his best attention.-There are objections to such a system. One is, that the Colonies are now deluged with convict settlers, and it would be a hazardous experiment to introduce from the most abandoned classes, after so short a period of probation, such additional large numbers. As we have transmitted to Australia already some of the vilest of our population, it is our duty now to send them over some of the most respectable and steady. We hope, however, ere long, to see so extensive an evil effectually dealt with, as well as exposed.

Note.-In the “Summary of News' in our last, the sum raised by the Home and Colonial Infant School Society should have been stated as £5000-not £500.

NOTICES TO CORRESPONDENTS. The communication entitled “A National Prayer" has been twice

sent to our printer, but not inserted, from want of room. We do not insert it now, because the occasion to which it refers has

passed away. Received a Parable for a Sunday-school.”

FOSTER, PRINTER, KIRKBY LONSDALE.

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In the beginning of this year, we printed and sent a circular to many of the clergy and other individuals likely to be interested in our little periodical. From it we shall make some extracts :

The TEACHER'S VISITOR was set on foot by the Editor in 1844.

“He had previously been frequently urged by various friends to edit a Monthly Magazine, dedicated to subjects specially interesting to the Teachers of Sunday and Week-day Schools. It was evidently undesirable that the only magazines which professed to occupy this field should be, as they then were, under the control of those who dissent from our Church.

“ In these circumstances, the Teacher's VISITOR was projected and established. While disclaiming all uncharitable feeling towards Dissenters, and freely acknowledging the blessing from God which has often followed their labours, the Editor nevertheless desired to establish within the pale of the Church of England 'a channel of communication for her Teachers, through which they might not only claim what they require, without fear of meeting with such reflections as are calculated to weaken their attachment to that Church in whose busom they are labouring; but through which they might be reminded of the peculiar privileges of that Church, and be brought to be more and more in love with her truly Scriptural constitution, and spiritual forms of worship.'*

“ That these objects have to some extent at least been realized, the success which has attended this little peri* Introductory Address to the Teacher's Visitor for May, 1844.

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odical is a sufficient proof. It is, however, the Editor's anxious wish to make it still more useful to the important classes for whose benefit it is intended. He therefore solicits the co-operation of his brethren the Clergy, and other persons connected with Schools, both in making the Teacher's Visitor more generally known and circulated amongst Teachers, and also in contributing articles suited for its pages.

“Each number contains a carefully written set of Scripture Lessons for every Sunday in the month, suitable for the use of a Sunday-school Teacher. A series, of papers upon the “Collects” appeared in the early numbers, and illustrations of the other Church formularies are given from time to time.

“ The Editor intends to introduce into his Magazine, more frequently than hitherto, articles suitable for Teachers of Week-day Schools, and he hopes that such Teachers will recollect that the VisitoR is intended to meet their wants, as well as those of Sunday-school Teachers.

" The Editor will feel obliged if this paper be put into the hands of Teachers, with a recommendation from their minister, should he approre the work.”

In pursuance of the intention expressed in our circular of making the TEACHER's Visitor a useful magazine for Week-dny as well as Sunday-school Teachers, we have Intely tnken considerable pains to have a portion of our pugen specially devoted to subjects interesting and profitable for schoolmasters and schoolmistresses. We have boon enabled to do this, without in ans degree diminishing the quantity of matter hitherto appropriated to the purposes of the Sunday-school.

We have also introduced some other changes, which we crunt our readers will find to add to the usefulness of our little work

Our renders have noticed, we daresay, a regularly appearing series of " Scriptural Illustrations.” These

t of elucidations of the Bible, chietis having referto Eastern countries and habits, which we hope e both useful and interesting to Teachers them.

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selves, and also furnish them with profitable anecdotes to enliven the attention of their classes.

Each month, we hope, will see a continuation of articles under the head “ Church Service,” intended to develope the treasures of our impressive and Scriptural Liturgy, and to foster an enlightened but fervent attachment to that evangelical branch of Christ's universal Church in which our Sunday-school Teachers have the privilege of labouring. In these days of innovation, it will be our earnest endeavour to bring out and defend the Protestant principles of the Church of England.

A series of articles also now appears regularly under the heading, “Missionary Intelligence." These generally consist of anecdotes and information which a Teacher can make useful in his school or class. The Mission Cause has our warm sympathy, and we believe it has also the sympathy of our readers. May God prosper his work, till the earth be full of his knowledge as the waters cover the sea.

The “Editor's Portfolio” contains miscellaneous gleanings which we hope will be useful to Teachers.

The kind friend to whom we have been hitherto indebted for the " Summary of News” still continues his valuable assistance.

The “ Scriptural Lessons,” for which we are indebted to another kind friend, we are sure will be found to be very valuable helps wherever they are used. We have some thoughts of reprinting them each month, separately from the Magazine, and placing them thus within the reach of Sunday-school Teachers who may not be able to purchase the Magazine itself. On this point we should like to have the opinions of friends.

Our heading, “Correspondence,” we regret to say, has not been well supplied of late. We wish the Clergy and Teachers would supply us with more communications under this head. If practical, such letters are often of great value. Whatever plans a Teacher finds useful in his class or school, we would gladly insert, if communicated to us; and also any difficulties which a Teacher may wish to be submitted to other judgments than his own.

We have only to say, in conclusion, that our best odical is a sufficient proof. It is, however, the Editor's anxious wish to make it still more useful to the important classes for whose benefit it is intended. He therefore solicits the co-operation of his brethren the Clergy, and other persons connected with Schools, both in making the Teacher's Visitor more generally known and circulated amongst Teachers, and also in contributing articles suited for its pages.

“ Each number contains a carefully written set of Scripture Lessons for every Sunday in the month, suitable for the use of a Sunday-school Teacher. A series, of papers upon the “Collects” appeared in the early numbers, and illustrations of the other Church formu. laries are given from time to time.

The Editor intends to introduce into his Magazine, more frequently than hitherto, articles suitable for Teachers of Week-day Schools, and he hopes that such Teachers will recollect that the Visitor is intended to meet their wants, as well as those of Sunday-school Teachers.

“ The Editor will feel obliged if this paper be put into the hands of Teachers, with a recommendation from their minister, should he approve the work.”

In pursuance of the intention expressed in our circular of making the Teacher's Visitor a useful magazine for Week-day as well as Sunday-school Teachers, we have lately taken considerable pains to have a portion of our pages specially devoted to subjects interesting and profitable for schoolmasters and schoolmistresses. We have been enabled to do this, without in any degree diminishing the quantity of matter hitherto appropriated to the purposes of the Sunday-school.

We have also introduced some other changes, which we trust our readers will find to add to the usefulness of our little work.

Our readers have noticed, we daresay, a regularly appearing series of “Scriptural Illustrations." These consist of elucidations of the Bible, chiefly having reference to Eastern countries and habits, which we hope will be both useful and interesting to Teachers them.

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