Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB
[ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES; A STATISTICAL VIEW OF THE

GRAND FEDERAL PROCESSION; MR. WILSON'S ORATION;

WASHINGTON'S FAREWELL ADDRESS, &c. &ci

Philadelphia:
PUBLISHED BY MRS. SARAH ALCOCK,-434 NORTH FRONT STREET,

FOR SALE ALSO BY WILLIAM S, YOUNG,173 RACE STREET.

1843.

E

25

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1843, by Mrs. Sarah Alcock, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.

WM. S. YOUNG, Printer.

ADVERTISEMENT.

This work shall contain many interesting particulars of the Revolutionary War, with a brief view of what the illustrious WASHINGTON and our fathers went through during a seven years' war, in order to obtain the independence of the greatest Republican Nation that ever, to this day, presented itself to the view of the world.

The work will also contain the Declaration of the Independence of the United States, with the Federal Constitution of the same—with a brief view of the grand Procession of Philadelphia, when ten out of the then thirteen States of North America, signed the most sublime system of a Republican form of Government that the sun ever shone upon

since the creation of the world—also Washington's Farewell Address, and a brief view of the brilliant acts and elevated republican character of the young French nobleman LAFAYETTE, with many other illustrious Patriots and officers of the Revolutionary War of seventy-six, which revolved round the Father of our Country during the darkest hours of their arduous struggle for their lives and liberty, and also how the God of Nations has preserved and blessed the United States of North America, by spreading the shield of His providence over our beloved country, amid all the storms and anarchy that have caused many of the kingdoms and princes of the old world to vibrate and tremble with fear. Yet during all the violent

convulsions that have, more or less, agitated the governments of Europe, the United States have risen like a phoenix out of the fire of the French war with many of the belligerent nations of the old world, so that from a weak and small nation, in 1776, of not more than three millions of inhabitants, she has in the course of sixty-seven years, multiplied to the number of eighteen millions of free citizens, so that the history of all the nations of the earth cannot present to the mental view of mankind a parallel case of the rise of so great and prosperous a nation in so short a period of time.

The object and design of the writer is to put the rising generation, with all the rest of mankind, in remembrance of what Washington and our fathers suffered in privation, labour, and blood, to obtain the civil and religious liberty which we, as a nation, now enjoy. The work is written by a person who is still living, and who was a witness, more or less, from the commencement of the war, at the battle of Bunker Hill down to the present time.

[merged small][merged small][graphic]

Dr. Benjamin Franklin, in the month of July, 1773, who was then in the city of London, presenting to Captain John Hewson letters of address to General Roberdeau and several other gentlemen of the cities of Philadelphia and New York.

A BRIEF

HISTORY OF THE REVOLUTION.

[ocr errors]

BIOGRAPHY OF CAPTAIN JOHN HEWSON.

OUR object in this work is to give a brief view of the private and public life of Captain John Hewson, born in the city of London, Old England, in the year 1744; a descendant by the line of his fathers from Colonel Hewson, an officer in Oliver Cromwell's army. he advanced in life, his mind became seriously exercised with the doctrines and principles of national, civil, and religious liberty; and it came to pass as he frequently met with the different political societies in the city of London, from the year 1767 to the year 1772, inclusive; and after reading and hearing of the different views which the members of those societies gave of the doctrines of civil, religious, and national liberty, and then taking into serious reflection some of the unjustifiable acts and measures of the British Houses of Parliament, in order to reduce the rising colonies of North America into a state of the most degrading vassalage to the reigning prince on the British throne, and after meeting more or less with those so

« AnteriorContinuar »