The Collected Writings of Thomas De Quincey, Volumen2

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Adam and Charles Black, 1889

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Página 256 - Or mild concerns of ordinary life, A constant influence, a peculiar grace ; But who, if he be called upon to face Some awful moment to which Heaven has joined Great issues, good or bad for human kind, Is happy as a Lover ; and attired With sudden brightness, like a Man inspired...
Página 262 - All shod with steel, We hissed along the polished ice in games Confederate, imitative of the chase" And woodland pleasures, - the resounding horn, The pack loud chiming, and the hunted hare.
Página 208 - But how can He expect that others should Build for him, sow for him, and at his call Love him, who for himself will take no heed at all...
Página 204 - My shaping spirit of Imagination. For not to think of what I needs must feel But to be still and patient, all I can; And haply by abstruse research to steal From my own nature all the natural man — This was my sole resource, my only plan; Till that which suits a part infects the whole, And now is almost grown the habit of my soul.
Página 235 - She was a phantom of delight When first she gleam'd upon my sight; A lovely apparition, sent To be a moment's ornament; Her eyes as stars of twilight fair; Like Twilight's, too, her dusky hair; But all things else about her drawn From May-time and the cheerful dawn; A dancing shape, an image gay, To haunt, to startle, and waylay. I saw her upon nearer view...
Página 440 - And take delight in its activity; Even so this happy Creature of herself Is all-sufficient; solitude to her Is blithe society, who fills the air With gladness and involuntary songs.
Página 293 - The Youth of green savannahs spake, And many an endless, endless lake, With all its fairy crowds Of islands, that together lie As quietly as spots of sky Among the evening clouds.
Página 137 - I were to linger upon this, the greatest event in the unfolding of my own mind. Let me say in one word, that, at a period when neither the one nor the other writer was valued by the public — both having a long warfare to accomplish of contumely and ridicule, before they could rise into their present estimation — I found in these poems " the ray of a new morning," and an absolute revelation of untrodden worlds, teeming with power and beauty, as yet unsuspected amongst men.
Página 450 - When Mrs. Siddons came into the room, there happened to be no chair ready for her, which he observing, said with a smile, ' Madam, you who so often occasion a want of seats to other people, will the more easily excuse the want of one yourself.
Página 148 - I recognized my object. This was Coleridge. I examined him steadfastly for a minute or more ; and it struck me that he saw neither myself nor any other object in the street.

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