Collected Stories

Portada
Penguin, 1994 - 363 páginas
A newly translated collection of stories. His desire to remain faithful to his Jewish roots and yet to be free of them gives Babel a duality of vision, which infuses his work with a powerful energy, from the earliest tales.

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LibraryThing Review

Crítica de los usuarios  - DanielSTJ - LibraryThing

This was a very interesting, yet elusive, set of short stories. The setting is distant, but we are pulled into it through the details and the characters which reveal the world that Babel was operating ... Leer comentario completo

LibraryThing Review

Crítica de los usuarios  - mrgan - LibraryThing

I don't know if it's the translation, or the way this particular edition is set up, or what, but I just found the stories here a slog—with a few notable exceptions, which I remember enjoying in other anthologies. Leer comentario completo

Páginas seleccionadas

Contenido

III
3
IV
7
V
11
VI
19
VII
21
VIII
27
IX
41
X
49
XXXIV
156
XXXV
160
XXXVI
163
XXXVII
167
XXXVIII
170
XXXIX
177
XL
182
XLI
190

XI
59
XII
67
XIII
71
XIV
80
XV
89
XVI
91
XVII
93
XVIII
96
XIX
101
XX
103
XXI
112
XXII
116
XXIII
119
XXIV
123
XXV
126
XXVI
128
XXVII
131
XXVIII
136
XXIX
138
XXX
144
XXXI
150
XXXIII
152
XLII
198
XLIII
199
XLIV
204
XLV
208
XLVI
213
XLVII
218
XLVIII
222
XLIX
225
L
227
LI
235
LII
237
LIII
244
LIV
254
LV
260
LVI
267
LVII
277
LVIII
289
LIX
299
LX
311
LXI
327
LXII
340
Derechos de autor

Términos y frases comunes

Acerca del autor (1994)

Isaac Babel was born in Odessa in 1894, the son of a Jewish tradesman. At the age of twenty-one he went to St Petersburg, where he had to avoid the Tsarist police because he lacked the residence certificate required of all Jews. Gorky was the first to encourage Babel by printing two of his stories in his magazine. During the First World War, Babel fought with the Tsarist army and in 1917 went over to the Bolsheviks. In 1923 he returned to literature with a number of short stories printed in periodicals. An instant literary success, these formed the nucleus of the Odessa Stories, a group of vivid sketches of Russian Jewish life, and the unforgettable Red Cavalry (1926), written out of his experiences with Budyonny's cavalry in the Polish campaign of 1920. Other stories, scenarios and plays followed. Unable to conform to the demands for political conformism that were being made on him, however, Babel was arrested suddenly in 1939. He died, possibly in 1941.

David McDuff was educated at the University of Edinburgh and has translated a number of works for Penguin Classics, including Dostoyevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov.


David McDuff was educated at the University of Edinburgh and has translated a number of works for Penguin Classics, including Dostoyevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov.

Información bibliográfica