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SYMPOSIUM OF VIEWS PROTESTING AGAINST
A SURRENDER OF AMERICAN-RIGHTS AND
UPHOLDING THE SIDE OF THE UNITED
STATES IN THE TOLL CONTROVERSY

A discussion of the Hay-Pauncefote treaty, of
the right of foreign nations to interfere in our
domestic affairs, and of the influences back of
the effort to repeal the sections of the Panama
Canal Act beneficial to American commerce

Extracts from Congressional Record and Public Documents
Compiled by Hon. JOSEPH R. KNOWLAND, of California

1912-1913

WASHINGTON

1913

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Declaration from Democratic platform in favor of free tolls for coastwise ships..
Declaration from national Progressive platform in favor of free tolls for coastwise

ships..
Theodore Roosevelt, extracts from letter in Outlook.
Minority report of House Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, ex-

tracts from.
O'Gorman, Hon. James A., from speech of, in United States Senate, January

22, 1913....
Mann, Hon. James R., from speech of, in House of Representatives, January

28, 1913..
Interpretation of Hay-Pauncefote treaty by Senators present when treaty was

pending before United States Senate..
Smith, Hon. Hoke, from speech of, in United States Senate, August 7, 1912.
Martine, Hon. James E., from speech of, in United States Senate, January 22,

1913.
Williams, Hon. John Sharp, from speech of, in United States Senate, August

7, 1912...
Thornton, Hon. John R., from speech of, in United States Senate, August 6,

1912..
Sulzer, Hon. William, from speech of, in House of Representatives, May 21,

1912...
Newlands, Hon. Francis G., from speech of, in United States Senate, January

22, 1913.
Cannon, Hon. Joseph G., from speech of, in House of Representatives, May 18,

1912..
Cooper, Hon. Henry A., from speech of, in House of Representatives, May 21,

1912.
Borland, Hon. William P., from speech of, in House of Representatives, May

17, 1912..
Lodge, Hon. Henry Cabot, from speech of, in United States Senate, July 20,

1912.
Covington, Hon. J. Harry, from speech of, in House of Representatives, May

21, 1912..
Townsend, Hon. Charles E., from speech of, in United States Senate, July 18,

1912
Kahn, Hon. Julius, from speech of, in House of Repre entatives, May 21, 1912..
Calder, Hon. William M., rom speech of, in House of Representatives, May 19,

1912...
Cummins, Hon. A. B., from speech of, in United States Senate, August 7, 1912..
Jones, Hon. Wesley L., from speech of, in United States Senate, August 6, 1912.
Doremus, Hon. Frank E., from speech of, in House of Representatives, May 16,

1912.
Broussard, Hon. Robert F., from speech of, in House of Representatives, May

21, 1912..
Chamberlain, Hon. George F., from speech of, in United States Senate, August

7, 1912....
Alexander, Hon. Joshua W., from speech of, in House of Representatives, May

1912.
Humphrey, Hon. William E., from speech of, in House of Representatives

May 17, 1912
Bradley, Hon. William O., from speech of, in United States Senate, July 29,

1912..
Towner, Hon. Horace M., from speech of, in House of Representatives May 17,

1912.

17,

95272-12090

3

4

Page. Knowland, Hon. Joseph R., from address by, on “Significance of British

Objections,” before Lake Mohonk Conference on International Arbitration,
May 16, 1913...

81 Taylor, Dr. Hannis, from address by, before American Society of International Law.

87 British authorities, Edwd. S. Cox-Sinclair and C. A. Hereshoff Bartlett, LL.B., uphold position of United States....

91-97 Olney, Hon. Richard, ex-Secretary of State, paper by, before American Society of International Law, April 25, 1913...

104 Anderson, Chandler P., formerly counselor for Department of State, address by, before American Society of International Law...

110 "The Panama Canal-Shall it be American or Anglo-American,” by Hon.

Samuel Seabury, justice of the Supreme Court of the State of New York. 116 Feuille, Frank, law officer of Isthmian Canal Commission, article prepared by., 125 Reference to newspaper comment and resolutions upholding position of United States..

134

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EXTRACTS FROM CONGRESSIONAL RECORD AND

PUBLIC DOCUMENTS.

SYMPOSIUM OF VIEWS PROTESTING AGAINST A SURRENDER OF AMERICAN RIGHTS AND UPHOLDING. THE SIDE OF

THE UNITED STATES IN THE TOLL CONTROVERSY.

[From the Congressional Record, Feb. 6, 1913.] DECI:ARATION IN PLATFORM OF NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC PARTY

UNANIMOUSLY APPROVED AT BALTIMORE ON JULY 2, 1912.

We favor the exemption from tolls of American ships engaged in coastwise trade passing through the Panama Canal. We also favor legislation forbidding the use of the Panama Canal by ships owned or controlled by railroad carriers engaged in transportation competitive with the canal.

[From the Congressional Record, Feb. 6, 1913.]

DECLARATION IN PLATFORM OF NATIONAL PROGRESSIVE PARTY

UNANIMOUSLY APPROVED IN CHICAGO ON AUGUST 7, 1912.

The Panama Canal, built and paid for by the American people, must be used primarily for their benefit. We demand that the canal shall be so operated as to break transportation monopoly now held and misused by the transcontinental railroads, by maintaining sea competition with them; that ships directly or indirectly owned or controlled by American railroad corporations shall not be permitted to use the canal, and that American ships engaged in coastwise trade shall pay no tolls.

[From the Congressional Record, Feb. 6, 1913.]

EXTRACT FROM LETTER OF THEODORE ROOSEVELT IN OUTLOOK,

JANUARY 18, 1913.

I believe that the position of the United States is proper as regards this coastwise traffic. I think that we have the right to free bona fide coastwise traffic from tolls. I think that this does not interfere with the rights of any other nation, because no ships but our own can engage in coastwise traffic, so that there is no discrimination against other ships when we relieve the coastwise traffic from tolls. I believe that the only damage that would be done is the damage to the Canadian Pacific Railway. Moreover, I do not think that it sits well on the representatives of any foreign nation, even upon those of a power with which we are, and I hope and believe will always remain, on such good terms as Great Britain, to make any plea in reference to what we do with our own coastwise traffic, because we are benefiting the whole world by our action at Panama, and are doing this where every dollar of expense is paid by ourselves. In all history I do not believe you can find another instance where as great and expensive a work as the Panama Canal underta lzen not hyo nrirate

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