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Part VII-STATUTES OF THE CIVIL WAR PERIOD.

CONFEDERATE STATUTES. CIVIL WAR.

(Printed from “The Statutes at Large of the Provisional Government of the Confederate

States of America, from the institution of the government, February 8, 1861, to its termination, February 18, 1862, inclusive," etc., edited by James M. Matthews, Attorney at Law, and Law Clerk in the Department of Justice, printed by R. M. Smith Printer to Congress, Richmond, 1864; “Public Laws of the Confederate States of America, passed at the First Session of the First Congress; 1862," edited by James M. Matthews, Attorney at Law, and Law Clerk in the Department of Justice, printed by R. M. Smith, Printer to Congress, Richmond, 1862; “Public Laws of the Coofederate States of America, passed at the 2nd Session of the 1st Congress; 1862,** edited by James M. Matthews, Attorney at Law, and Law Clerk in the Department of Justice, printed by R. M. Smith, Printer to Congress, Richmond, 1862; *Public Laws of the Confederate States of America passed at the 3rd Session of the 1st Congress; 1863,” edited by James M. Matthews, Attorney at Law, and Law Clerk in the Department of Justice, printed by R. M. Smith, Printer to Congress, Richmond 1863; " Public Laws of the Confederate States of America, passed at the 4th Session of the Ist Congress, 1863-4," edited by James M. Matthews, Attorney at Law, and Law Clerk in the Department of Justice, printed by R. M. Smith, Printer to Congress, Richmond, 1864; “Public Laws of the Confederate States of America, passed at the 1st Session of the 2nd Congress, 1864,” edited by James M. Matthews, Attorney at Law, and Law Clerk in the Department of Justice, printed by R. M. Smith, Printer to Congress, Richmond, 1864.)

ACTS PASSED BY THE CONFEDERATE PROVISIONAL CON

GRESS, SECOND SESSION.

(P. 106.) May 11, 1861.

CHAP. IX.-An Act relative to telegraph lines of the Confederate States. President authorized to take The Congress of the Confederate States of America do the control of telegraph lines.

enact, That during the existing war, the President be and he is hereby authorized and empowered to take such control of such of the lines of telegraph in the Confederate States, and of such of the offices connected therewith, as will enable him effectually to supervise the communications passing through the same, to the end that no communications shall be conveyed of the military operations of thegovernment to endanger the success of such operations, nor any communication calculated to injure the cause of the Confederate States, or to give aid and

comfort to their enemies. To appoint Sec. 2. The President shall appoint trustworthy agents agents to supertisos.communica in such offices, and at such points on the various lines as

he may think fit, whose duty it shall be to supervise all communications sent or passing through said lines, and to prevent the transmission of any communication deemed to be detrimental to the public service.

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treasury.

When he may Sec. 3. In case the owners and managers of said lines

take possession of shall refuse to permit such supervision, or shall fail or the lines, refuse to keep up and continue the business on said lines, the President is hereby empowered to take possession of the same for the purposes aforesaid. SEC. 4. The President shall from time to time issue

To issue instruo

tions to the agents instructions to the agents so appointed, and to the oper- and operators of ators of the various lines, to regulate the transmission of communications touching the operations of the government, or calculated to affect the public welfare.

SEC. 5. That the President, at his discretion, may em- Mayemploy the ploy the operators of the lines as the agents of the governmtant.

agents of the gov. ernment, so that in this as in all other respects, there may be as little interference with the business and management of such lines as may be compatible with the public interest.

SEC. 6. That the compensation of the agents appointed or agents to be under this act, where such agents are not officers of the Praid out of the company, and the expense attending the execution of the provisions of this act, shall be paid out of the treasury.

Sec. 7. That no communications in cypher, nor enig- tions in cypher matical, or other doubtful communication, shall be trans- communications. mitted, unless the person sending the same shall be known to the agent of the government to be trustworthy, nor until the real purport of such communication shall be explained to such agent. SEC. 8. That the President is hereby authorized, when- Extension and

may be found necessary or advisable for the successful prosecution of the war, to extend existing lines of telegraph, or make connections between the same, the expense of contracting such additional lines to be paid out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated.

Sec. 9. That all present and future officers of the telegraph lines engaged in receiving and transmitting intelligence within the Confederate States shall, as soon as practicable after the passage of this act or after their appointment, take and subscribe before any judicial officer of any one of the Confederate States, the following oath: “I, A B, do solemnly swear that I will support and of Oather required maintain the Constitution of the Confederate States of America, and will not, knowingly, directly or indirectly, transmit through the telegraph any communication or information calculated to injure the cause of the Confederate States, or to give aid or comfort to their enemies."

and connection of lines.

ever it

Communications touching

Sec. 10. That if any person shall knowingly send or military opera-transmit any message or communication touching the

military operations of the government, without the same

being first submitted to the inspection of the agent of Party sending, the government, or any message calculated to aid and subject to indict

promote the cause of the enemies of the Confederate

States, he shall be subject to indictment in the district Fine and im-court of the Confederate States, and on conviction shall prisonment.

be fined in a sum not less than five hundred dollars, and imprisoned for a term not less than one year.

APPROVED May 11, 1861.

ment.

to agents of tele

[P. 124.) May 21, 1861.

CHAP. XXXVI.--An act to amend an act relative to telegraphic lines of

the Confederate States approved May, one thousand eight hundred and

sixty-one Compensation The Congress of the Confederate States of America do Eraphe.companies enact, That the sixth section of the “act relative to Presedantiesith telegraph-lines of the Confederate States,” be and the

same is hereby so amended as to authorize the President to : llow such compensation as may be reasonable and proper, in addition to what may be allowed by the telegraph companies, to such of the agents of said companies as he may charge with special and important duties, where such agents are deemed trustworthy and acceptable both to him and the companies concerned.

APPROVED May 21, 1861.

(P. 152.] May 21, 1881.

CHAP. LV.-An act to prohibit the exportation of cotton from the Confederate States, except through the seaports of said States, and to punish

persons offending therein. Export of cotton except

The Congress of the Confederate States of America do ports of the c. s., enact, That from and after the first day of June next, prohibited.

and during the existence of the blockade of any of the ports of the Confederate States of America by the government of the United States, it shall not be lawful for any person to export any raw cotton or cotton yarn from the Confederate States of America, except through

the seaports of the said Confederate States; and it shall Duty of marshals and revenue be the duty of all the marshals and revenue officers of officers.

the said Confederate States, to prevent all violations of this act.

cles forfeited.

Sec. 2. If any person shall violate, or attempt to Penalty for vio violate or evade the provisions of the foregoing section, he shall forfeit all the cotton or cotton yarn thus attempted to be illegally exported, for the use of the Confederate States; and in addition thereto he shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction thereof shall be fined in a sum not exceeding five thousand dollars, or else imprisoned in some public jail or penitentiary for a period not exceeding six months, at the discretion of the court, after conviction upon trial by a court of competent jurisdiction.

Sec. 3. Any person informing as to a violation or Informer enti: attempt to violate the provisions of this act, shall be proceeds of artientitled to one-half the proceeds of the articles forfeited by reason of his information.

Sec. 4. Any justice of the peace, on information under Justice may isoath from any person, of a violation or attempt to violate the seizure of cotthis act, may issue his warrant and cause the cotton or cotton yarn specified in the affidavit to be seized and retained until an investigation can be had before the courts of the Confederate States.

Sec. 5. Every steamboat or railroad car which shall Steamboats, be used with the consent of the owner or person having lating this act, the same in charge, for the purpose of violating this act, shall be forfeited in like manner to the use of the Confederate States. But nothing in this act shall be so

Exportation of construed as to prohibit exportation of cotton to Mexico cotton to Mexico through its co-terminous frontier.

APPROVED May 21, 1861.

ton.

ACTS PASSED BY CONFEDERATE PROVISIONAL
CONGRESS, THIRD SESSION.

(p. 170.) CHAP. IX.-An Act to extend the provisions of an act entitled "An August 2, 1861.

act to prohibit the exportation of cotton from the Confederate States, except through the seaports of said States, and to punish persons offending therein," approved May twenty-one, eighteen hundred and sixty-one. The Congress of the Confederate States of America do Act of 1861,

May 21, ch. 55, enact, That the provisions of the above recited act be, prohibiting

, coop and the same are hereby extended, and made applicable ton, except, &c. to the exportation of tobacco, sugar, rice, molasses, articles. syrup and naval stores, from the Confederate States, from and after the tenth day of August next.

Approved August 2, 1861.

extended to other

(p. 176.]

Aug. 16, 1861.

CHAP. XXII.-An Act to amend the law in relation to the export

of tobacco, and other commodities.

Act of May 21, 1861, prohibiting

The Congress of the Confederate States of America export cotton, do enact, That the act passed at the present session except, &c., to take 'immediate entitled

“An Act to extend the provisions of an act effect.

entitled 'An act to prohibit the exportation of cotton from the Confederate States except through the seaports of said States, and to punish persons offending therein,'” approved May twenty-one, Anno Domini, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one, shall go into effect immediately after the approval of this act.

Approved August 16, 1861.

ACTS OF CONFEDERATE PROVISIONAL CONGRESS,

FIFTH SESSION.

Ip. 276.)

CHAP. LXXXII.-An Act to provide for the connection of the railroad

from Selma, in Alabama, 10 Meridian, in Mississippi.

Advancement

WHEREAS, The President in his message of the 17th of December, has expressed the opinion that the completion of the Mississippi and Alabama River Railroad, so as to connect Selma, in Alabama, with Meridian, Mississippi, is indispensable for the successful prosecution of the war, in which opinion Congress fully concurs; Now, therefore,

The Congress of the Confederate States of America do to complete the railroad connec-enact, That the President be, and he is hereby, authorized ma, Alabama and to advance to the President and Directors of the Alabama Meridian, Mississippi.

and Mississippi River Railroad Company, the sum of one hundred and fifty thousand dollars, for the purpose of completing the railroad connection between Selma, in Alabama, and Meridian, in Mississippi, upon such terms and conditions as he may deem best to secure the early completion of said railroad connection, and to secure the return of the money so advanced.

APPROVED February 15, 1862.

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