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APPLICATIONS FOR REGISTRATION CERTIFICATES AND EXPORT LICENSES,

PROVIDED FOR HEREUNDER, BY PERSONS RESIDING IN ANY DEPENDENCY OF THE UNITED STATES.

Applications to the Federal Reserve Board either for registration certificates or for licenses to export coin, bullion or currency may be made by persons residing in any dependency of the United States (including the Philippine Islands, Alaska, Guam, Hawaii, Porto Rico, Virgin Islands, and Canal Zone) through such agency located in any such dependency as may be hereafter designated by the Federal Reserve Board, instead of through a Federal Reserve Bank: but until an agency has been so designated in any such dependency, persons residing therein may make such applications through any Federal Reserve Bank. The Federal Reserve Board may from time to time postpone, in respect of any one or more of such dependencies, the date on and after which persons residing therein shall be prohibited from engaging in any of the transactions or making any transfer hereinhefore prohibited without having obtained registration certificates, in case such registration certificates can not be obtained on or before the date herein before specified.

WOODROW WILSON. THE WHITE HOUSE, January 26,1918.

[No. 2796.)

PART IV.-ACTS AND RESOLVES OF THE CONTINENTAL

CONGRESS.

JOURNALS OF THE CONTINENTAL CONGRESS.

(Library of Congress Edition.)

RECOMMENDATIONS CONCERNING FURNISHING AND MAKING

ARMY SUPPLIES.

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Upon motion the Congress came to the following resolutions:

Resolved, That it be, and is hereby earnestly recommended to the several Colonies of New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Connecticut and the interior towns of Massachusetts bay, that they immediately furnish the American army before Boston with as much powder out of their town, and other publick stocks as they can possibly spare; keeping an exact account of the quantities supplied; that it may be ayain replaced, or paid for by the continent; this to be effected with the utmost secrecy and dispatch.

That it be recommended to the committees of the several towns and districts in the colonies of the Massachusetts bay, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Providence Plantations, Connecticut, New York, and the eastern division of New Jersey, to collect all the salt petre and brimstone in their several towns and districts, and transmit the same, with all possible despatch, to the provincial Convention at New York.

That it be recommended to the provincial Congress (convention] of the colony of New York, to have the powder Mills, in that colony, put into such a condition as immediately to manufacture, into gun powder, for the use of the Continent, whatever materials may be procured in the manner above directed

That it be recommended to the committees of the western division of New Jersey, the colonies of Pennsylvania, lower counties on Delaware and Maryland, that they, without delay, collect the salt petre and sulphur in their respective Colonies, and transmit the same to the committee for the city and liberties of Philadelphia; to the end, that those articles may be immediately manufactured into gun powder, for the use of the continent.

That it be recommended to the conventions and committees of the colonies of Virginia, North Carolina and South Carolina, that they, without delay, collect the salt petre and sulphur in their respective colonies, and procure these articles to be manufactured, as soon as possible, into gun powder, for the use of the Continent.

That it be recommended to the several inhabitants of the united colonies, who are possessed of salt petre and sulphur, for their own use, to dispose of them for the purpose of manufacturing gun powder.

That the salt petre and sulphur, collected in consequence of the resolves of Congress for that purpose, be paid for out of the continental fund. [II Journals of the Continental Congress (Library of Congress), June 10, 1775, p. 85.]

RESOLUTION FOR ENCOURAGING CERTAIN IMPORTS.

Whereas, the Government of Great Britain hath prohibited the exportation of arms and ammunition to any of the plantations, and endeavoured to prevent other nations from supplying us:

Resolved, That for the better furnishing these colonies with the necessary means of defending their rights, every vessel importing Gun powder, Salt petre, Sulphur, provided they bring with the sulphur four times as much salt petre, brass field-pieces, or good muskets fitted with Bayonets, within nine Months from the date of this resolution, shall be permitted to load and export the produce of these colonies, to the value of such powder and stores afores", the non-exportation agreement notwithstanding; and it is recommended to the committees of the several provinces to inspect the military stores so imported, and to estimate a generous price for the same, according to their goodness, and permit the importer of such powder and other military stores aforesaid, to export the value thereof and no more, in produce of any kind. .

Ordered, That a copy of the above be delivered to the delegates of the Colony of Pennsylvania, who are desired to request the committee of this city to forward the same in hand bills to the West Indies and such places as they think proper, taking care that it be not published in the news papers. [II Journals of the Continental Congress (Library of Congress), July 15, 1775, p. 184.)

RESOLUTION CONCERNING PUBLICATION EARLIER RESOLUTION AND RECOMMENDATION TO SEIZE CERTAIN KING'S STORES.

On motion made,

Resolved, That the resolution of Congress July 15 (for encouraging the importation of arms and ammunition, and the resolution of the 18th inst. for collecting an account of the hostilities committed by the ministerial troops and navy,) be immediately) published, with this amendment, to expunge the word "provisions” and instead therefor to insert “the produce of these colonies," and dispersed through the different nations of Europe and through W. I. Islands.

It being represented to the Congress that a large quantity of blankets and shirts remains in the King's Stores in New York,

Resolved, That it be recommended to the Convention of New York immediately to take possession of the said blankets and shirts, and forward so many of them as may be necessary to Gen'l Schuyler for the use of the army under his command. [III Journals of the Continental Congress (Library of Congress), October 26, 1775, pp. 306, 307.)

RESOLUTION REGARDING ARMY SUPPLIES AND IMPRESSMENTS.

Resolved, That in order to supply the army with provisions, the Commissary gen[erall be directed to cause cattle and hogs to be driven at proper seasons to the camp, there to be (slaughtered and] cured; and as to the articles of bread and flour, that he proceed in the way (that) he has done for some time past.

Resolved, That such officers as have served in the present army to approbation, and are willing to stay, be preferred; and if there are more of these than are necessary for the new army, that the General distinguish such as he deems best qualified.

Resolved, That it be recommended to the several legislatures of New England to empower the General to impress carriages, vessels, horses, and other things necessary at a reasonable rate, for the transportation or march of the army, or any part of it, or on any other emergency, and that this power may be deputed in writing under the hand of the General to the quarter master general, or to any inferior officer, who are to be accountable for any abuse thereof. (III Journals of the Continental Congress (Library of Congress), November 4, 1775, p. 323.)

1

SEIZURE AND DESTRUCTION OF ENEMY VESSELS.

Resolved, That if the Convention, or, in their recess, the council of safety of South Carolina, shall think it expedient for the security of that colony, to seize or destroy, and shall seize or destroy, any ship or vessel of war, this Congress will approve of such proceeding. (III Journals of the Continental Congress (Library of Congress), November 4, 1775, p. 326).

SEIZURE OF ARMS AND AMMUNITION.

The Committee appointed to enquire into the grounds of the information, respecting a quantity of arms and ammunition being to be procured, report, that they have examined into the same, and have received intelligence that a quantity of arms and ammunition, and other articles are concealed in Tryon county, in which also there are several tories armed and inlisted in the enemy's service: Whereupon,

Resolved, That the said committee be directed to communicate the said intelligence to General Schuyler, and in the name of the Congress, desire him to take the most speedy and effectual measures for securing the said arms and military stores, and disarming the said tories, and apprehending their chiefs. [III Journals of the Continental Congress (Library of Congress), December 30, 1775, p. 466.]

DISARMING OF CERTAIN PERSONS.

Resolved, That Colonel Nathaniel Heard, of Woodbridge, in the colony of New Jersey, taking with him five or six hundred minute men, under discreet officers, do march to the western part of Queen's County, and that Colonel Waterbury, of Stanford, in the colony of Connecticut, with the like number of minute men, march to the eastern side of said county; that they confer together, and endeavour to enter the said county on the same day; that they proceed to disarm every person in the said county, who voted against sending deputies to the said convention, and cause them to deliver up their arms and ammunition on oath, and that they take and confine in safe custody, till further orders, all such as shall refuse compliance. (IV Journals of the Continental Congress (Library of Congress), January 3, 1776,

p. 27.)

DISARMING OF CERTAIN COLONISTS.

Resolved, That it be recommended to the several assemblies, conventions, and councils or committees of safety of the United Colonies, immediately to cause all persons to be disarmed within their respective colonies, who are notoriously disaffected to the cause of America, or who have not associated, and shall refuse to associate, to defend, by arms, these United Colonies, against the hostile attempts of the British fleets and armies; and to apply the arms taken from such persons in each respective colony; in the first place to the arming the continental troops raised in said colony; in the next, to the arming such troops as are raised by the colony for its own defence, and the residue to be applied to the arming the associators; that the arms when taken be appraised by indifferent persons, and such as are applied to the arming the continental troops, be paid for by Congress, and the residue by the respective assemblies, conventions, or councils, or committees of safety. (IV Journals of the Continental Congress (Library of Congress), March 14, 1776, p. 205.]

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