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“The mind should be great in imagination and virtuous emotion, no less than in intellect, to be healthy and vigorous in all its proportions.”—RUSKIN.

“It is no wisdom to make boys prodigies of information ; but it is our wisdom and our duty to cultivate their faculties each in its season—first the memory and imagination, and then the judgment; to furnish them with the means, and to excite the desire of improving themselves, and to wait with confidence for God's blessing on the result.”—Rev. DR. ARNOLD.

“Poetry has been to me an exceeding great reward ; it has soothed my affliction ; it has multiplied and refined my enjoyments ; it has endeared my solitude ; and it has given me the habit of wishing to discover the Good and the Beautiful in all that meets and surrounds me.”-COLERIDGE.

“ Verse far exceedeth prose in the knitting up of the memory. Who is it that ever was a scholar that does not carry away some verses which in his youth he learned, and even to old age serve him for hourly lessons.”—Sir PHILIP SIDNEY.

“ There are some truths, deeper and more vital than those of Science, and with respect to which the heart-is wiser than the head. It is Poetry or Literature which—reflecting the concentrated result of the universal experience of life communicates these unchanging and everlasting truths through the imagination, affections, and conscience.”—NATIONAL REVIEW.

"Its great tendency and purpose is, to carry the mind beyond and above the beaten, dusty, weary walks of ordinary life ; to lift it into a purer element ; and to breathe into it more profound and generous emotion. It reveals to us the loveliness of nature, brings back the freshness of early feeling, revives the relish of simple pleasures, keeps unquenched the enthusiasm which warmed the spring-time of our being, refines youthful love, strengthens our interests in human nature by vivid delineations of its tenderest and loftiest feelings, spreads our sympathies over all classes of society, knits us by new ties with universal þeing, and, through the brightness of its prophetic visions, helps faith to lay hold on the future life.—ŘEV. DR. CHANNING.

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RHYMED VERSE.

PAGR

The Isles of Greece

Lord Byron

1

Sunset at Athens .

Lord Byron 4

The Present Aspect of Greece.

Lord Byron

6

Lady Clara Vere de Vere

Tennyson

9

King Robert of Sicily

Longfellow 11

The High Tide

Miss Ingelow 18

Lucy

Wordsworth, 23

My Mind to me a Kingdom is

The Character of a Happy Life Sir Henry Wotton 25

The Holly-Tree

Southey 26

Knowledge

Ascribed to Shakespeare 27

The Homes of England

Mrs. Hemans 28

Love of Country

Sir Walter Scott 29

Ye Mariners of England

Campbell 30

Battle of the Baltic .

Campbell 31

The Knight's Tomb

Coleridge 33

My Last Duchess

Browning 34

“ Imperial Cæsar, dead, and turned to clay". Shakespeare 35

Ode to a Nightingale

Keats 36

To a Waterfowl

Bryant 38

The Pharisee and the Publican

Crashaw 39

The Passions.

Collins 40

The Reason Why

43

The Death of Marmion.

Sir Walter Scott 44

Waterloo.

Lord Byron 47

The Charge of the Light Brigade .

Tennyson 50

The Burial of Sir John Moore .

Wolfe 52

Somebody's Darling

Mrs. Lacoste 53

“ Take them, O Death ! and bear away”. Longfellow 54

The Curfew-song of England

Mrs. Hemans 55

Prayer

Crabbe 56

The Burial of William the Conqueror Mrs. Hemans 57

The Norman Baron .

Longfellow 59

Elegy in a Country Churchyard

Gray 61

The Dying Christian to his Soul

Pope 65

The Sleep

Mrs. Barrett-Browning 66

Address to the Ocean

Lord Byron 68

The Shipwreck

Lord Byron 70

The Treasures of the Deep

Mrs. Hemans 72

Alexander's Feast

Dryden 74

Ode for Music

on St. Cecilia's Day

Pope 78

· Love among the Ruins .

Browning 82

The Battle of Blenheim

Southey 85

The Cross in the Wilderness

Mrs. Hemans 87

On the Receipt of my Mother's Picture

. Cowper 90

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PAGE

To Daffodils.

Herrick 94

Love.

Sir Walter Scott 94

The Bells

Poe 95

Jock o' Hazeldean

Sir Walter Scott 98

Lord Ullin's Daughter .

Campbell 99

The Fugitives

Shelley 101

To Mary in Heaven

Burns 103

The Children's Hour

Longfellow 104

Crescentius

Mrs. Maclean (L.E.L.) 106

The Vagrant and his Dog

Trowbridge 107

The Pauper's Death-Bed

Mrs. Southey 111

Little Jim.

. Farmer 112

The Exile of Erin.

Campbell 114

An Address to a Mummy.

Horace Sinith 115

How they brought the Good News fromGhent to Aix. Browning 118

Lochiel's Warning

Campbell 120

Song of Saul before his Last Battle

Lord Byron 123

Saul.

Lord Byron 123

The Common Lot.

James Montgomery 124

The Inchcape Rock .

. Southey 126

Hohenlinden.

Campbeil 128

Tubal Cain

Mackay 129

Casabianca

Mrs. Hemans 131

Weep not for those whom the veil of the tomb." Moore 132

The Wreck of the Hesperus .

Longfellow 133

The Dying Gladiator

Lord Byron 136

Abou Ben Adhem and the Angel

Leigh Hunt 136

The Slave's Dream

Longfellow 137

Annabel Lee.

Poe 139

My Child .

Pierpoint 140

The Heritage

Lowell 142

Sonnet on his Blindness

Milton 144

The Dream of Eugene Aram

Hood 145

" He prayeth well, who loveth well”.

Coleridge 151

Sweet Mary

Wolfe 152

Melrose Abbey.

Sir Walter Scott 153

“ A Thing of Beauty is a Joy for ever”.

Keats 153

A Regret.

Alsagar Hay Hill 154

Broken Friendship

Coleridge 155

The Rising of the Vendee

Croly 156

The Destruction of Sennacherib

Lord Byron 157

Lochinvar.

Sir Walter Scott 158

6. Worth makes the Man”

Pope 159

The Raven

Poe 160

The Glove

and the Lions

Leigh Hunt 163

Marston Moor

Praed 164

Ivry

Lörd Macaulay 166

The Three Sons

Moultrie 168

avelock's March on Cawnpore

170

at spell was good King Robert's, say" 'Sir Walter Scoit 171

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BLANK VERSE.

Hamlet's Soliloquy on Death

Shakespeare 172

Cato's Soliloquy on the Immortality of the Soul Addison 173

Hamlet's Soliloquy on his Mother's Marriage . Shakespeare 174

Hamlet's Soliloquy on his Irresolution . Shakespeare 175

Hamlet's Soliloquy on his Procrastination Shakespeare 177

Soliloquy of King Claudius on his Guilt Shakespeare 178

“Through tattered clothes small vices do appear” Shakespeare 179

Satan's Address to the Sun .

Milton 180

Manfred's Address to the Sun.

Lord Byron 182

Henry the Fourth's Soliloquy on Sleep. Shakespeare 183

Henry the Sixth's Soliloquy on Kingly Greatness. Shakespeare 184

Manfred's Soliloquy—The Coliseum

Lord Byron 186

Address to Light

Milton 187

“ Could great Men thunder"

Shakespeare 188

Soliloquy of Gloster after killing Henry the Sixth Shakespeare 189

Gloster's Soliloquy after wooing the Lady Anne Shakespeare 190

Gloster's Soliloquy on his Deformity.

Shakespeare 191

Clarence's Dream

Shakespeare 192

Edward the Fourth’s Remorse.

Shakespeare 194

“No ceremony that to great ones 'longs" Shakespeare 195

Glenalvon's Soliloquies

Home 196

Soliloquy of Brutus on Cæsar

Shakespeare 198

Macbeth's Soliloquy on the Murder of Duncan. Shakespeare 199

Macbeth's Address to the Dagger.

Shakespeare 200

Hamlet's Address to his Father's Ghost Shakespeare 201

The Ghost to Hamlet

Shakespeare 202

Darkness

Lord Byron 204

Cardinal Wolsey on his Fall.

Shakespeare 207

Polonius's Advice to his Son

Shakespeare 208

Ulysses on Perseverance

Shakespeare 209

Douglas to Lord Randolph

Home 210

Tell's Address to the Alps

Sheridan Knowles 211

Cassius instigating Brutus against Cæsar Shakespeare 213

Hotspur's Description of a Fop

Shakespeare 215

What stronger breastplate

Shakespeare 216

Worcester's Defence of his Rebellion

Shakespeare 217

The Home of Love .

Lord Lytton 218

Claude Melnotte's Apology to Pauline . Lord Lytton 219

Our Indiscretion sometimes serves us well” Shakespeare 221

Richard the Second on Kingly Greatness Shakespeare 222

Shylock on his Wrongs

“ All the World's a stage

Shakespeare 223

Shakespeare 224

Henry the Fifth to his Army at Harfleur

Shakespeare 225

Henry the Fifth to his Army at Agincourt Shakespeare 226

“There is a Tide in the Affairs of Men”. Shakespeare 227

Othello's Address to the Senate

Shakespeare 228

The Banished Duke to his Followers

Shakespeare 230

L. J. Brutus over the body of Lucretia.

Payne 231

Coriolanus to the Romans

Shakespeare 233

To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow . Shakespeare 233

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