The Physical and Intellectual Constitution of Man Considered

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Smith, Elder, 1836 - 240 páginas

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Página 181 - Would he were fatter ! But I fear him not : Yet if my name were liable to fear, I do not know the man I should avoid So soon as that spare Cassius. He reads much ; He is a great observer and he looks Quite through the deeds of men...
Página 181 - Would he were fatter! but I fear him not: Yet if my name were liable to fear, I do not know the man I should avoid So soon as that spare Cassius. He reads much; He is a great observer, and he looks Quite through the deeds of men: he loves no plays, As thou dost, Antony; he hears no music: Seldom he smiles, and smiles in such a sort As if he mock'd himself, and scorn'd his spirit That could be moved to smile at any thing. Such men as he be never at hearts ease Whiles they behold a greater than themselves,...
Página 231 - And tell what crisis does divine The rot in sheep, or mange in swine ; In men, what gives or cures the itch, What makes them cuckolds, poor or rich ; What gains or loses, hangs or saves...
Página 228 - It is now clearly proved — yet it is necessary to repeat the truth, because the contrary error is still found in the newest works — that neither the Gallas (who border on Abyssinia) nor the Bosjesmen, nor any race of Negroes, produced that celebrated people...
Página xii - In descending, therefore, towards the centre, through nearly 4000 miles, the condensation of ordinary substances would surpass the utmost powers of conception. Dr. Young says, that steel would be compressed into one-fourth, and stone into one-eighth of its bulk at the earth's centre.
Página 184 - ... genius, which, piercing through the various combinations and relations of surrounding circumstances, sees all things in their just dimensions, and attributes to each its due. Of the various occupations in which Lorenzo engaged, there is not one in which he was not eminently successful ; but he was most particularly distinguished in those which justly hold the first rank in human estimation. The facility with which he turned from subjects of the highest importance to those of amusement and levity,...
Página 18 - ... of our days it cannot be disputed that the general mass of this Popul. had a very different character — and that the greater part of the races which composed it have been utterly destroyed. no bone of ape or monkey among the inhab. of warm climates — nor of man — This much is certain that we are now at least in the midst of a fourth succession of Land animals — that after the age of reptiles, the age of Palaeotheria, the age of Mammoths, and that of Mastodons and Megatheria has come the...
Página 108 - ... of the mountains, nor those of the marsh like the vegetables of the river or of dry grounds ; it will also be seen that the vegetation of all valleys, all mountains, marshes, or rivers, has a similar character in the same latitudes. The Flora of the granitic mountains of Spain and Portugal is very different from that of the calcareous mountains of the same kingdoms : in Switzerland, Teucrium...
Página 184 - ... particularly distinguished in those which justly hold the first rank in human estimation. The facility with which he turned from subjects of the highest importance to those of amusement and levity, suggested to his countrymen the idea that he had two distinct souls combined in one body. Even his moral character seems to have partaken in some degree of the same diversity, and his devotional poems are as ardent as his lighter pieces are licentious. On all sides, he touched the extremes of human...
Página 40 - ... would be of all creatures the most destitute and miserable. Distracted by terror and goaded by famine ; driven to the most abject expedients for concealment from his enemies, and to the most cowardly devices for the seizure and destruction of his nobler prey, his existence would be one continued subterfuge or stratagem; — his dwelling would be in dens of the earth, in clefts of rocks, or in the hollows of trees ; his food worms, and the lower reptiles, or such few and crude productions of the...

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