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THE

ENGLISH JOURNAL

THE OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE NATIONAL COUNCIL

OF TEACHERS OF ENGLISH

EDITORIAL BOARD

JAMES FLEMING Hosic, Managing Editor

Chicago Normal College
FRANKLIN T. BAKER, Columbia University

EDWIN M. HOPKINS, University of Kansas
PERCY H. BOYNTON, University of Chicago CORNELIA STEKETEE Hulst, Grand Rapids
Emma J. BRECK, Oakland (Cal.) High School

(Mich.) High School
JOHN M. CLAPP, Lake Forest College

EDWIN L, MILLER, Northwestern High School,
BENJAMIN A, HEYDRICK, High School of Com-

Detroit
merce, New York

ELMER W. SMITH, Colgate University.
CHARLES SWAIN THOMAS, Newton (Mass.) High School

Representing the National Council of Teachers of English
ADAN G. GRANDY, Highland Park, Iu.

FRED NEWTON Scott, University of Michigan
LEMUEL A. PITTENGER, State Normal School, Kent, Ohio

VOLUME III

JANUARY-DECEMBER 1914

THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO PRESS

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS

207066

Published
January, February, March, April, May, June, September,

October, November, December, 1914

Composed and Printed By
The University of Chicago Press

Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.

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The last quarter of a century has seen a remarkable increase of interest in the teaching of English. From a lowly position, perhaps the lowest, in the school curriculum, it has risen to a high, perhaps the highest, position. If it is less well paid than it should be, at least its value and importance are appreciated. It has enlisted the services of able thinkers and writers. It is perhaps the most popular subject in the educational magazines. It has been made the theme of many books.

A number of societies, of which the National Council is, I hope, a shining example, have been founded for the sole purpose of promoting the teaching of English, and all of these societies are in a flourishing condition.

The methods of teaching have been carefully scrutinized by experts and the improvements that have been suggested and put into effect have increased the interest of the pupils and reduced the waste of energy on the part of the teacher.

In short, the teaching of English has for the first time in its history been organized and put on a basis of efficiency.

Nevertheless, in spite of this advance in both the theory and practice of the teaching of English, there is a suspicion in many quarters that the results are not commensurate with the effort. I do not refer now to the recent article of Mr. Edward Bok,

Presidential address delivered before the National Council of Teachers of English at the annual meeting in Chicago, November 28, 1913.

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