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EGL. FEAR NOT: THE FOREST IS NOT THREE LEAGUES OFF.

Act v Sc.2.

London Published by FC&J Rivington and Partners Feb 1823

I'll use thee kindly for thy mistress' sake,
That us'd me so; or else, by Jove I vow,

I should have scratch'd out your unseeing eyes,
To make my master out of love with thee.

[Exit.

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Egl. The sun begins to gild the western sky;
And now, it is about the very hour

That Silvia, at Patrick's+ cell, should meet me.
She will not fail; for lovers break not hours,
Unless it be to come before their time;
So much they spur their expedition.

Enter SILVIA.

See, where she comes: Lady, a happy evening!
Sil. Amen, amen! go on, good Eglamour,
Out at the postern by the abbey-wall;

I fear, I am attended by some spies.

Elg. Fear not the forest is not three leagues off: If we recover that, we are sure enough.7

[Exeunt.

The same.

SCENE II.

An Apartment in the Duke's Palace.

Enter THURIO, PROTEUS, and JULIA.

Thu. Sir Proteus, what says Silvia to my suit?

+"friar Patrick's” — MALONE.

7

sure enough.] Sure, is safe, out of danger.

Pro. O, sir, I find her milder than she was; And yet she takes exceptions at your person. Thu. What, that my leg is too long?

Pro. No; that it is too little.

Thu. I'll wear a boot, to make it somewhat rounder. Pro. But love will not be spurr'd to what it loaths. Thu. What says she to my face?

Pro. She says, it is a fair one.

Thu. Nay, then the wanton lies; my face is black. Pro. But pearls are fair; and the old saying is, Black men are pearls in beauteous ladies' eyes.8 Jul. 'Tis true, such pearls as put out ladies' eyes; For I had rather wink than look on them.

Thu. How likes she my discourse?

Pro. Ill, when you talk of war.

[Aside.

Thu. But well, when I discourse of love, and peace? Jul. But better, indeed, when you hold your peace.

[Aside.

Thu. What says she to my valour?

Pro. O, sir, she makes no doubt of that.

Jul. She needs not, when she knows it cowardice.

[Aside.

Thu. What says she to my birth?

Pro. That you are well deriv'd.

Jul. True; from a gentleman to a fool.

[Aside.

Thu. Considers she my possessions?

Pro. O, ay; and pities them.

Thu. Wherefore?

Jul. That such an ass should owe them.

[Aside.

Pro. That they are out by lease."

Jul. Here comes the duke.

• Black men are pearls, &c.] "A black man is a jewel in a fair woman's eye," is one of Ray's proverbial sentences.

9 That they are out by lease.] Because Thurio's folly has let them on disadvantageous terms; or, because they are let to others, and are not in his own dear hands; or, by Thurio's possessions, he himself understands his lands and estate. But Proteus chooses to take the word likewise in a figurative sense, as signifying his mental endow

Enter Duke.

Duke. How now, sir Proteus? how now, Thurio? Which of you saw sir Eglamour of late?

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Duke. Why, then she's fled unto that peasant Va

lentine;

And Eglamour is in her company.

'Tis true; for friar Laurence met them both,
As he in penance wander'd through the forest:
Him he knew well, and guess'd that it was she;
But, being mask'd, he was not sure of it:
Besides, she did intend confession

At Patrick's cell this even; and there she was not:
These likelihoods confirm her flight from hence.
Therefore, I pray you, stand not to discourse,
But mount you presently; and meet with me
Upon the rising of the mountain-foot

That leads towards Mantua, whither they are fled.
Dispatch, sweet gentlemen, and follow me.

Thu. Why, this it is to be a peevish girl,1
That flies her fortune when it follows her:

[Exit.

I'll after; more to be reveng'd on Eglamour,
Than for the love of reckless Silvia.2

[Exit.

Pro. And I will follow, more for Silvia's love,

Than hate of Eglamour that goes with her.

[Exit.

Jul. And I will follow, more to cross that love,

Than hate for Silvia, that is gone for love.

[Exit.

ments: and when he says they are out by lease, he means they are no longer enjoyed by their master, (who is a fool,) but are leased out to another.

1 —a peevish girl,] i. e. in ancient language, foolish.

- reckless Silvia.] i. e. careless, heedless.

SCENE III.

Frontiers of Mantua. The Forest.

Enter SILVIA, and Out-laws.

Out. Come, come;

Be patient, we must bring you to our captain.
Sil. A thousand more mischances than this one
Have learn'd me how to brook this patiently.
2 Out. Come, bring her away.

1 Out. Where is the gentleman that was with her? 3 Out. Being nimble-footed, he hath out-run us, But Moyses, and Valerius, follow him.

Go thou with her to the west end of the wood,
There is our captain: we'll follow him that's fled;
The thicket is beset, he cannot 'scape.

1 Out. Come, I must bring you to our captain's cave; Fear not; he bears an honourable mind,

And will not use a woman lawlessly.

Sil. O Valentine, this I endure for thee. [Exeunt.

SCENE IV.

Another Part of the Forest.

Enter VALENtine.

Val. How use doth breed a habit in a man!
This shadowy desert, unfrequented woods,
I better brook than flourishing peopled towns :
Here can I sit alone, unseen of any,

And, to the nightingale's complaining notes,
Tune my distresses, and record my woes.3

3

record my woes.] To record anciently signified to sing. To record is a term still used by bird-fanciers, to express the first essays of

a bird in singing.

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