Completely Parsed Cicero: The First Oration of Cicero Against Catiline

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Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers, Jan 1, 2004 - 250 páginas
Maclardy's volume is an irreplaceable primary resource for every reader of Cicero's First Oration Against Catiline. At the bottom of each page below the text, each Latin word is completely parsed and includes helpful references to the revised grammars of Allen and Greenough, Bennett, Gildersleeve, and Harkness. The Latin text is accompanied by an interlinear word-for-word translation. A more polished translation is found in the margin next to sections of the Latin text. Maclardy's commentary also delves into word derivations and word frequencies, thus making this volume helpful for the competent reader of Latin as well as the novice. A new introduction by Steven Cerutti of East Carolina University provides guidelines for the use of this resource by high school Latin teachers and educators at all levels.
 

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Contenido

Sección 1
6
Sección 2
8
Sección 3
11
Sección 4
14
Sección 5
15
Sección 6
17
Sección 7
22
Sección 8
26
Sección 13
54
Sección 14
57
Sección 15
85
Sección 16
120
Sección 17
145
Sección 18
150
Sección 19
154
Sección 20
161

Sección 9
29
Sección 10
35
Sección 11
36
Sección 12
38
Sección 21
182
Sección 22
215
Sección 23
234
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Born in Arpinum on January 3, 106 B.C., Marcus Tullius Cicero was a Roman orator, writer, and politician. In Rome, Cicero studied law, oratory, philosophy, and literature, before embarking on a political career. Banished from Rome in 59 B.C. for the execution of some members of the Catiline group, Cicero devoted himself to literature. Cicero was pardoned by Julius Caesar in 47 B.C., and returned to Rome to deliver his famous speeches, known as the "Philippics," urging the senate to declare war on Marc Antony. Cicero's chief works, written between 46 and 44 B.C., can be classified in the categories of philosophical works, letters, and speeches. The letters, edited by his secretary Tiro, showcase a unique writing style and charm. The most popular work of the period was De Officiis, a manual of ethics, in which Cicero espoused fundamental Christian values half a century before Christ. Cicero was murdered in Formiae, Italy, on December 4, 43 B.C., by Antony's soldiers after the triumvirate of Antony, Lepidus, and Octavius was formed.

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