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between the East and the West will depend largely on the attitude of the western nations themselves.

“It has seemed to many of our citizens who have become familiar with the questions raised by this more intimate and ever increasing contact with the Orient that the United States might well adopt a more adequate Oriental policy. Therefore, be it

RESOLVED, That the Commission on Relations with Japan appointed by the Federal Council of the Churches of Christ in America urge upon Congress and upon the people of the United States the importance of adopting an Oriental policy based upon a just and equitable regard for the interests of all the nations concerned, and to this end suggests that the entire immigration problem be taken up at an early date, providing for comprehensive legislation covering all phases of the question (such as the limitation of immigration and the registration, distribution, employment, education, and naturalization of immigrants) in such a way as to conserve American institutions, to protect American labor from dangerous economic competition, and to promote an intelligent and enduring friendliness among the people of all nations."

In authorizing the publication of this report of Professor Millis the Commission does so for the purpose of placing this information before the churches and the people of the United States for such help as it may render in forming an intelligent opinion. Neither the Commission nor the Federal Council is committed to its matters of detail, but they are convinced of its general value and they believe that it should be available for our people. It is hoped that this report and the report of the Federal Council commissioners to Japan may contribute to an understanding that shall bring the East and the West into a spirit of sympathy and unity in the universal Kingdom of God and assist in placing our international relations upon a just, secure, and abiding moral foundation.

HAMILTON Holt, Chairman.
CHARLES R. BROWN,
WILLIAM I. HAVEN,
CHARLES R. HENDERSON,
E. R. HENDRIX,
JEREMIAH W. JENKS,
ALBERT G. LAWSON,
FREDERICK LYNCH,
FRANCIS J. McCONNELL,
John R. MOTT,
FRANK MASON NORTH,
DOREMUS SCUDDER,
ROBERT E. SPEER,
GEORGE E. VINCENT,
Amos P. WILDER,

Commission on Relations with Japan.

SIDNEY L. GULICK,
Representative of the Commission on

Relations with Japan.

CHARLES S. MACFARLAND, Secretary.

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PREFACE

ALTHOUGH for more than six years there has been effective restriction of the immigration of Japanese laborers into the United States, various measures have been under consideration to replace the agreement through which this restriction has been effected. Some of the measures would be more, others less, restrictive than the existing agreement. Their consideration shows that the immigration question has not been settled in a manner satisfactory to all. At the same time, much discriminatory legislation bearing upon the life and activities of the Japanese, and possibly other Asiatics, in this country has been proposed and some of it enacted into law. The most important measure thus far enacted is the alien land law of California. Still other discriminatory measures are now being urged, while outside of the legislative field there has been and still is much in the relations between the races that is unsatisfactory.

The Japanese Problem, it is evident, involves two questions, one relating to the admission of immigrants, the other to the treatment accorded those who are here. In the chapters which follow the writer has attempted to present in a frank and conscientious way the more important things bearing upon both of these questions. It has been his plan to bring together historic and present-day facts so that all essential to drawing conclusions with reference to proper policy shall receive due recognition.

In order that this survey of the situation in the West might be written, several weeks were spent in making personal investigations. Most of the time available for the investigation was spent in California, which has been the storm center in matters connected with Asiatic immigration, but some days were spent in each of the other Coast states and in Utah and Colorado. I observed as much as possible, conferred with numerous representative men of different classes, and obtained as much statistical and other data as I could. I was fortunate in the fact that I was acquainted with many repre ntative men and had first-hand knowledge of immigration and industries in the West by reason of my employment as agent in charge of the investigations made five years ago by the Immigration Commission in the Rocky Mountain and Pacific Coast states. My task was less difficult than it would have been because it involved chiefly bringing the things investigated and reported on to the government down to date. Inasmuch as my knowledge of the earlier situation was incorporated in three volumes of the reports published by the Immigration Commission, these volumes have been extensively quoted in these chapters.

I know that there is still much for me to learn about different phases of the Japanese problem here discussed. I know, also, that in spite of the pains I have taken to avoid it, I cannot hope to have escaped falling into error here and there. If only I have succeeded in making a slight contribution to the knowledge of fact required for the solution of the problem, I shall regard my time as having been well spent.

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