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my cause with all the eloquence I | And at length" the rosy-fingered was master of, and expatiating Aurora" had appeared, before largely on my misfortunes, I was Morpheus shed his influence adismissed with a severe reprimand, round my head. Harassed almost to and a notice that such circum- distraction, I arose, foolishly, yet stances would not be so easily fondly, hoping that even at that earoverlooked another time. I be-ly hour, I might behold the beautilieve the truth was, they thought ous fair one, on whom alone my I had somehow or another got a drop too much, for the violence of my passion had in some degree turned my brain, and made me forget myself.

heart was fixed; but indeed thinking, whatever might he the issue in this respect, a walk into the country at that calm hour of morn, might tend to sooth my troubled After this delay, I thought. it spirits. Vain hope! my fondest would be useless to proceed far-expectations were again frustrather, as the object of my pursuit ted, and I have continued through was by this time probably safe the whole day in the same unhaphoused, or at least too far to be py situation; totally unfit for stuovertaken, and was determining dy to which I ought to have devowith myself what course I should ted myself. However as Tom pursue, when luckily I was join- Squib is constantly on the look out ed by my old friend Tom Squib, for me, I still cherish the hope of who, having heard the dangers removing my grievances, and ere and difficulties I had already en-long making my affections known countered, kindly offered to con- to the lovely object, to whom and to duct me home to my College. Af-whom alone they are directed. In ter much persuasion, I at last reluctantly consented; but what words can describe to you the horrors of my situation 'till the dawn of day; agitated in mind by a thousand cruel reflections, and by no means at ease in my bodily parts! One moment I upbraided myself for giving way to such a hopeless passion; the next I pictured to myself dreams of happiness, which I might enjoy, could I ever obtain the object of my wishes; but still the cruel doubt remained, how that so much de

my future adventures should any thing worthy of notice occur, I shall have great pleasure in forwarding it to you: but let me assure you that my only object in begging your insertion of this is to warn other young men of my sanguine disposition from falling into the like misfortune; and by so doing you will greatly oblige,

Your's truly,

JASPER.

Dr. Franklin found that Ants

sired object was to be obtained, had some means of communicating

their thoughts, or desires, to one | Brave PICTON, son of victory!

another. In a summer-house at the end of his garden, there happened to be a small earthen pot half full of treacle. This he found swarming with Ants, which were quietly feasting on it. These he shook out except a single Ant, and then suspended the pot by means of a string from the ceiling. The captive Ant endeavoured to escape, and at last found out the way, by climbing up the string to the ceiling, and from thence down the wall to the ground, and

His life-blood shed his realms to

save;

The arm, that set all Europe free,
Lies nerveless in the clay-cold grave.

He left the world a legacy,

Peace profound, and prospects bright;

His work achieved, his soul burst free, And wing'd her way to realms of light.

Who can recount each daring deed,

The feats of valour he perform'd; The hosts he chas'd with eagle-speed, The battles gain'd, the forts he storm'd?

into the garden. About half an His deeds shall swell the trump of

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Vain was the man, and false as vain Who said "were he ordained to

run

"His long career of life again "He would do all that he had done!'

Ah! 'tis not thus the voice that dwells In sober birth-days speaks to me, Far otherwise-of time it tells

Lavish'd unwisely, carelessly

Of counsels mock'd, of talents made
Haply for high and pure designs,
But oft, like Israel's incense, laid
Upon unholy, earthly shrines—
Of nursing many a wrong desire—
Of wandering after love too far,
And taking every meteor fire,

That cross'd my path-way, for his
star;

All this it tells, and could I trace

Th' imperfect picture o'er again, With power to add, retouch, efface,

The lights and shades, the joy and pains;

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How little of the past would stay; How quickly all would melt awayAll but that freedom of the mind Which hath been more than wealth

to me; Those friendships in my boyhood twin'd

And kept till now unchangingly; And that dear home, that saving ark, Where love's true light at length I've found,

Cheering within, when all grows dark, And comfortless and stormy round. J. D. Fontenelle. "Si je recommençois ma carriere, je ferai tout ce que j'ai fait."

A FRAGMENT.

By Lord Byron.

When, to their airy halls my father's voice,

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EPITOME OF MAN'S LIFE.

Childhood in toys delights;
And youth in sports as vain;

Shall call my spirit, joyful in their Mid age has many cares and frights;

choice;

Old age is full of pain.

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As to take him before and leave me writing, and shall be glad to hear

behind?

No. 3, Vol. I.---June 23, 1824.

from them on other subjects.

[Printed and Published by F. Trash, Oxford.

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death of his mother, to visit the continent. In 1638 he went to Paris, where he was introduced to the celebrated Grotius; and after he had prosecuted his journey as far as Italy, he returned to his native country, after an absence of fifteen months. England was then embroiled in civil discord, and Milton, being hostile to monarchial principles, wrote boldly and ably in support of the republican party.

JOHN MILTON, the justly celebrated author of some of the finest compositions that ever appeared before the public, was born Dec. 9th, 1608, in Bread Street, He married Mary, daughter of London. His Grandfather was so Richard Powell, of Forest Hill, rigid a papist, that he, in conse- Oxfordshire; the principles of quence of difference of religious this gentleman were diametrically opinions, disinherited this son opposite to his own, and their (the father of the Poet) who was marriage is more remarkable than compelled to follow the profession their separation, which took place of a Scrivener. His eldest son, about a month after their union. John, (the poet) was the favourite After some time had elapsed, of his father's hopes; he received when he was on a visit to a friend, his first instructions from Mr. T. his wife fell prostrate before him, Young, whose care and capacity imploring forgiveness and a rehis pupil has gratefully celebrated conciliation. At the intercession in an excellent Latin poem: on of the friends who were present, leaving this gentleman he went to St. Paul's School; from whence he was removed to Christ's College, Cambridge, where he distinguished himself in all kinds of academical studies. After he had obtained his Master's Degree, he returned to his father, who was then living at Horton, in Bucking-he from retaining any unkind hamshire, where he pursued his studies with unabated ardour, and unparallelled success.

After some years spent in this studious retirement, he obtained his father's consent, upon the

after a short reluctance, he generously sacrificed all his resentment to her tears:

-Soon his heart relented Towards her, his life so late, and dear Now at his feet submissive in disdelight, tress.||

After this re-union, so far was

memory of the provocations which he had received from her ill conduct, that when the king's cause was entirely suppressed, and her

Paradise Lost, Book X.
G

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