Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

I think the estimate is too small by about 124 per cent. Should you want any information further please let me know and I will do the best I can for you. Yours, respectfully,

NICHOLAS BALL. Lieut. Col. GEO H. ELLIOT, U. S. A.

P. S.—The mackerel fleet of 200 sail, which is spoken of in the report, I should say would average the past six years 100 sail that came into the outer bay for a harbor, the crews coming on shore in their boats to obtain water and supplies. Several years ago the fleet fished in these waters for two months and harbored around the island, one side or the other, nearly every night.

N. B.

STATISTICS OF THE USE BY VESSELS OF THE INNER HARBOR AT BLOCK ISLAND,

RHODE ISLAND,

Names of home vessels engaged in the fishing and freighting business. -Steamers: Geo. W. Danielson and Ocean View. Schooners: N. F. Dixon, Rose Brothers, Hattie Rebecca, Annie Godfrey, Laura Louise, Mystery, Laura E. Garnage, and about fifty others, including sloops, &c.

Vessels from New London, Connecticut.- Schooners : Emma, Chapel Brothers, Maria, White Cloud, Hattie Douglass, Robert Gray, Nelson, Woolsey, Alnoma, C. M. Harris, Laurel, Conquest, Horizon, James Woolsey, Kate Church, Belle of the Bay, Scotia; Sloops: Thorn, S. R. Packer, Favorite, Nettie Foote, Superior, Fashion, J. G. Freeman, Sharon, and about fifteen or twenty others whose names are not at hand.

Vessels from Noank, Connecticut.-Schooners: Mary Hoxie, Emma, Jas. Potter, Mary Potter, Redwing, Phebe, Annie Fowler, Ada, Belle, Ira and Abby, Willey; steamer Eva; Sloops : S. B. Miller, Wildwood, Eagle, Millie, Isabella, Ella May, Tiny B., and about ten or fifteen others whose names are not at hand.

Vessels from New Bedford, Massachusetts. Schooners : Quilip, Gracie Phillips, Bella, Emma Clifton, Wasp, J. W. Flanders, Maria, Black Swan, Spy, Yankee Bride, Village Belle, Penekese. Sloops : Transit, Frank Clarke, Carrie, Ida, Wm. Young, and about ten or fifteen others whose names are not at hand.

In addition to the above there are about 225 mackerel and other fishing vessels from Cape Cod and the east; 50 menbaden steamers from different places, about 20 vessels from Newport, R. I., during the winter, quite a number from New York, and there are annually probably thirty cargoes from larger vessels, with coal, wood, lumber, bricks, &c., besides the numerous yachts and other craft which frequent here in the summer months, Government vessels with supplies, &c. The greater part of them are compelled to anchor in the outer harbor in consequence of the overcrowded basin. Vessels with cargoes are greatly inconvenienced, and often are compelled to wait for vacancies, and even then collisions are imminent, to the great disadvantage of all concerned.

IMPROVEMENT OF LITTLE NARRAGANSETT BAY, RHODE ISLAND

AND CONNECTICUT.

Little Narragansett Bay lies on the north side of the eastern entrance from the ocean into Long Island Sound, and is inclosed on the southern and eastern sides by a long and narrow tongue of land, extending from the mainland at Watch Hill, first westerly and then northerly to the entrance to the bay, which is from the outer harbor of Stonington. Pawcatuck River, upon which is situated the flourishing commercial and manufacturing town of Westerly, R. I., empties into the eastern side of the bay, and has been improved by the United States. The mean rise and fall of the tide is 2.63 feet.

ORIGINAL CONDITION

The navigable draught of water through the bay before improvement was about 41 feet at mean low water, and this depth limited the navigation of Pawcatuck River.

PLAN OF IMPROVEMENT.

The project of 1878 for the improvement of the bay provided for a channel 200 feet wide and 71 feet deep at mean low water, extending from the entrance to the bay to the mouth of the Pawcatuck, and the removal of the bowlders which then obstructed navigation, and any others which the excavation of the channel might develop. Subsequently it was determined to clear away some large bowlders which interfered with steamboat navigation between this channel and Watch Hill, an important place of summer resort. The estimated cost of the improvement was $51,000.

A plat of Little Narragansett Bay, showing the improved channel, was published in the Apnual Report of the Chief of Engineers for 1879, page 314.

AMOUNT EXPENDED AND RESULTS.

The project was completed in the fiscal year 1883–'84. The main channel as projected was excavated to its full width and depth, and the channel to Watch Hill was increased from 90 to 165 feet in width by the removal of bowlders. Vessels drawing ten feet of water can now reach the mouth of the Pawcatuck River at bigh water, but the full benefit of the improvement cannot be utilized until further deepening of that river to enable vessels of the same draught to reach the important manufacturing town of Westerly. A report on this subject was submitted September 19, 1884, in compliance with the river and harbor act of Congress of July 5, 1884, which was printed as House Ex. Doc. No. 183, Forty-eighth Congress, second session, a copy of which will be found in Appendix C 13.

The remainder of the last appropriation for this work is reserved for comparative surveys of Sandy Point, at the entrance to the bay, which seems to be affected by the construction of the breakwater in Stonington Harbor, and for range. marks on Pawcatuck Point to guide through the new channel. The total cost of the completed improvement was $35,856.96.

Little Narragansett Bay is in the collection district of Providence and Stonington, the dividing line passing through the bay. Providence and Stonington are the nearest ports of entry. The revenue collected in the last fiscal year was: Providence, $201,977.87; Stonington, $1,511.76. The nearest light-houses are the Stopington and Watch Hill lights. The nearest fortification is Fort Trum bull, New London, Conn.

MONEY STATEMENT.

July 1, 1884, amount available..
July 1, 1885, amount available...

$143 04 143 04

[merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]

E. L. FREEMAN & SON, PRINTERS TO THE STATE.

« AnteriorContinuar »