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CORRECTED, AND AUGMENTED WITH A CONSIDERABLE
NUMBER OF NEW ARTICLES,

IN TWO VOLUMES.

VOL. II.

Parva sunt hæc; fed parva ista non contemnendo, majores nostri
maximam hanc rempublicam fecere.

Cicero.

lotrtott:

PRINTED FOR THE EDITOR,

AND SOLD BY KERBY AND CO. STAFFORD-STREET, OLD BOND-STREET;

AND AT THE LITERARY REPOSITORY, WIMPOLE AND

WIGMORE-STREET, CAVENDISH-SQUARE.

1796.

Price, Fourteen Shillings the Two Volumes, in Boards.

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LAUDER, WILLIAM, author of a violent attack on the originality and literary reputation of Milton, whose imitation of the moderns, he endeavoured to establish, by producing a variety of extracts from Paradise Lost, with analogous passages from preceding writers. His book excited a considerable degree of public attention, and the writer of it was for a short time, encouraged by Dr. Johnson, because he thought him too frantic to be fraudulent; a sentence more remarkable for alliteration than argument, as it is a common art of selsish design, to affect the cant, and use the language, of warm zeal, and strong conviction.

Lauder was a man of respectable literary attainments, with a good share of the characteristic acutenefs of his countrymen, but soured in his temper by early misfortune, and repeated disappointments. Jn consequence of a blow from the golfer players, on Bruntssield Links, he had been under the necessity of submitting to an amputation of his leg; in two attempts to succeed to

Vol. II. B

a professor's chair, and afterwards to the ossice of library keeper to the universiry of Edinburgh, he failed. Lastly he was tempted to publish a splendid and expensive edition of the Ppetarum Scotorurst Musae Sacrp, in two. volumes, a work, which promising both fame and prosit, droppedftill-born from the press, and served only to exhaust the little money he had saved.

Thus driven by necessity to London, eager to attract notice, anxious to procure emolument, and not very scrupulous in the means he employed; it struck him, that Milton had laid himself open to the charge of plagiarism, and he thought the opportunity a good one, for building his own fame, at the expence of a poet, whose eminence, the greater it was, would in the fame proportion, elevate the man, who could make good his charges against him. But conscious of the general partiality in his favor, he commenced with a declaration, in which a malignant insinuation was artfully wrapped, in a mixture of circuitous candor, and contradictory panegyric, while his praise,

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