History of Europe from the Commencement of the French Revolution to the Restoration of the Bourbons in 1815, Volumen6

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Napoleons reply to Truguet
9
A coup détat is resolved on against the Jacobins
10
Napoleons reason for transporting the Jacobins though innocent
11
It is afterwards discovered that the Chouans were the really guilty parties
12
Napoleon creates the Duke of Parma King of Etruria
13
Parallel published by authority between Cæsar Cromwell and Napoleon
14
Debate on the lists of eligibility in the council of state
15
Admirable views of Napoleon on the subject
16
Decision on it by the legislature
17
Legion of Honour Napoleons arguments in favour of it in the council
18
of state 19 Military supremacy secured by civil qualifications 20 His argument for the extension of the honour to civilians
20
Arguments against the institution by Thibaudeau
21
Alleged tendency of the institution to originate a patrician class
22
And its tendency toward the reestablishment of a monarchy
23
Napoleons reply
24
Existence of honorary rewards in the ancient republics and necessity of them to the formation of the soldier 26 Necessity of such institutions to the m...
25
The vesting of the forfeited estates in absentees
28
Napoleon is created First Consul for ten years additional Grounds set forth in the senatusconsultum on the occasion
29
State of religion in France at this period
30
VOL VI
33
Ceremony on the occasion in Notre Dame
36
Splendid pageant on the field of Marengo
37
Subsequent opinions of Napoleon on the subject
42
Composition and direction of these forces
43
Ruinous effects of this violence
48
Movements of the French troops to surround the Austrians
49
Speech of Napoleon on the government of the colonies
54
Bloody combat at Hasslach
55
Cordial union of France and Prussia in this matter
57
His system to remedy the evils
60
Retreat of the Archduke Ferdinand with great loss
61
Conferences at Ratisbon
63
Strong opposition of Josephine to these attempts
66
The army of Mack defiles before Napoleon
67
Disastrous moral effects of this general spoliation of the ecclesiastical princes 152
69
Position of the French at Verona
73
The usages of the English representative system inapplicable to France
75
Gallant conduct of the Austrian rearguard
79
The two fleets separate without decisive success
80
Infamous proposals of Lucien rejected by Josephine
81
Defensive measures of the Austrians
82
Napoleon orders the combined fleet again to put to sea but it makes
86
Reflections on the difficulty of this subject
87
636
88
The Austrians cross the Inn Forces on both sides
92
Prodigious effects of this law in subdividing land in France
93
Restoration of the Gregorian Calendar
98
Great public works set on foot in France
99
The French are at length successful
100
Danger to him from war and his assertion of desire to conciliate 190
101
Dispositions on both sides
104
Napoleon passes through Vienna and establishes headquarters
106
Arrest of all the British travellers in France
107
The arrival of the commissioners augments the discord
108
Storming and massacre of Cape Town
109
The universal freedom of the blacks is proclaimed
110
The English obtain a footing on the island but are soon expelled
111
Furious civil wars between the negroes and mulattoes 1b 19 Napoleon confirms Toussaint in his command
112
Vigorous measures of the negro chief in the administration 21 His agricultural policy He is appointed president for life of the island
113
Napoleon instantly resolves to subdue the island
114
Increasing prosperity of the island under Toussaints administration ib 24 Preparations of Napoleon for its subjugation
116
Immense naval and military forces assembled
117
The British government makes no opposition ib 27 The expedition sails and arrives off St Domingo
118
First irresolution but final firmness of Toussaint
119
The French land and Cape Town is burnt by the blacks ib 30 But the French generally prevail in the field
120
Description of the mountainous interior to which the negroes retire
121
Fruitless attempt to induce Toussaint to submit
122
General and successful attack on his position
123
Desperate defence at CrêteàPierrot
124
The war assumes a guerilla character
125
Negotiations for the termination of hostilities Dignified conduct of Tous saint
126
General pacification
127
Treacherous views of Napoleon
128
Perfidious arrest of Toussaint by the French authorities ib 40 Subsequent treatment and death of Toussaint
129
Dreadful atrocities on both sides in Guadaloupe
130
General revolt in St Domingo Death of Le Clerc
131
Continued successes of the negroes
132
The rupture of the peace of Amiens causes the total destruction of the French
133
Victory also declares for the French on their left
134
Reflections on the expedition ib 46 Degraded state of St Domingo ever since that time
135
Inferiority of the negro to the European
136
Ambitious designs of Napoleon in Europe
137
Interview of the Emperor Francis with Napoleon
138
Holland is again revolutionised ib 50 And the Cisalpine republic again remodelled
139
Entry of Napoleon into Lyons Senatusconsultum there settling the Cisalpine government
140
Dissimulation of Prussia and accommodation with that power
141
Nature of the new constitution
142
Annexation of Piedmont to France ib 54 Construction of the road over Mont Cenis and the Simplon
143
83
144
Progress of the negotiation regarding the German indemnities
145
And of the north of Germany
146
Peace of Pressburg
147
Secret articles of the treaty
148
Objects of Napoleon in this treaty
149
Sentence of dethronement of the King of Naples
150
Reflections on this step
151
Secret views of Napoleon in this step
152
Napoleons return to Vienna Munich the Rhine and Paris
153
Reflections on the campaign
154
Importance of the valley of the Danube as the theatre of contest be tween France and Austria
155
Dangers of Napoleons position before the battle of Austerlitz
156
Vast growth of the military power of France during the peace
157
Similar growth during peace characterised all the reign of Napoleon
158
Justification which this affords of the British policy during the war
159
Great abilities displayed by Napoleon in the arrangements for this campaign
160
Errors of the Allies in the plan of the campaign
161
And their great imprudence
162
Ruinous effects of tbe indecision of Prussia
163
The French troops are withdrawn and the independence of the Valais
164
Progressive and steady growth of his fame
173
Erroneous views of foreign writers on bis designs
174
His errors
175
Equitable measures for the government of the country
176
His private character Funeral honours paid to him
177
Causes of irritation which gradually arose with France
183
note
185
Violent explosion of Napoleon in conversation with Lord Whitworth
189
CHAPTER XXXVII
219
APPENDIX
239
Napoleon gains over Prussia by hinting at its getting Hanover
256
Talleyrands answer
264
The accession of Hardenberg to power produces no external change
270
its inequality
275
Anecdotes of Napoleon at this period
279
Disgraceful adulation with which he was surrounded
281
Vast designs of the emperor at Mayence for the Confederation of the Rhine
282
Origin of the differences between England and Spain
283
Which at once brings on a war
288
Arguments in parliament against the conduct of government
289
On its conduct with regard to the treasureships
291
Defence of the government by Mr Pitt
292
On the successive provocations given by the Spanish government
293
Defence of the capture of the frigates
294
The government is supported by parliament
295
Reflections on the subject ib 71 And particulars in wbich England appears to have been wrong
296
CHAPTER XXXVIII
298
Discontent of the republican officers of the army
299
Pichegru in London and royalist movements in France
300
Which is taken advantage of by Great Britain
301
The royalist leaders are landed on the French coast
302
Fouché reveals the plot to Napoleon and is restored to power Arrest of the conspirators
304
Consternation which the announcement of the plot excites in Paris
305
Arrest of Pichegru
307
History and character of the Duc dEnghien
308
Generous conduct of his grandfather on a proposal to assassinate Napo leon note
309
Occupation of the prince at that time
311
He is seized and conducted to Strassburg Vain intercession of Josephine
312
He had been vainly warned of his danger and is removed to Vincennes ib 15 Where he is delivered over to a military commission by Napoleons orde...
314
Gross iniquity committed towards him
315
He is convicted upon his declaration only without any evidence
316
His noble demeanour before the judges
317
His sentence and execution
318
His innocence is completely established after his death
319
Napoleons vindication of himself at St Helena
320
642
323
He is declared Emperor of the French General concurrence of the nation
346
Result of the appeal to the people on the subject of the hereditary suc
352
Which was all owing to the violence and injustice of the French convul
358
CHAPTER XL
362
220
367
And assumption of the iron crown of Lombardy by the French Emperor
392
A convention is agreed to by the Hanoverian generals
398
Eugene appointed Viceroy of Italy and great improvements in his kingdom
400
Increasing jealousy of Austria and change in its ministry
406
Napoleon repairs to Boulogne to superintend the English expedition
413
Rapid improvement in the character and habits of the army
419
Operations of the combined fleets of France and Spain to second
426
Combined fleet had returned to Europe Its secret orders
434
Declarations against English commerce
435
CAMPAIGN OF AUSTERLITZ
439
Immense preparations on the shores of the Channel for the invasion of Britain
474
179
476
469
486
Steady progress of the Austrian empire
489
Union of different races and nations which compose the monarchy
490
Remarkable manner in which the Austrians have held together their empire
491
Great national reverses which this united spirit has enabled Austria to withstand
492
Which were all overcome by the steady attachinent of the provinces
493
Reflections on the opposite state of the British empire ab 7 Superficial extent population and revenue of the Austrian empire
494
Situation of Austria Statistical details regarding that monarchy
495
Diversity of surface and natural productions in its provinces
496
General aspect of Bohemia Moravia Galicia and Hungary
497
Variety of races in Austria
499
Military resources of the empire
500
Composition and strength of the Austrian army
501
Inference in political science to which this leads
502
Mode of obtaining men for the army and officers
503
The great breeding stations for the cavalry
505
2
506
Foreign and internal commerce
507
General prosperity of the Austrian people
508
Their habits and character
509
Causes of this remarkable wellbeing of the Austrian peasantry
510
Prorision for the poor in Austria
511
Austrian system of education
512
And in the other harbours in the Channel
513
Religious institutions of the empire
514
General principle of the Austrian government
515
95
516
Austria is in fact a confederation of monarchies
517
Civil government in the Imperial dominions
518
Public debt of Austria
519
Depreciation of the Austrian paper during the war and present sinkingfund
521
Her government and policy ib 32 Her jealousy of Prussia and reliance on England
522
Leading persons of its cabinet at this period
523
Statistics of the Empire
524
And state of the army
525
420
554
98
555
387
577
Its progress and horrors
587
694
595
Extension of French power in Italy
596
644
644
i
651
654
654
i
665

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Página 460 - my plan of attack, as far as a man dare venture to guess at the very uncertain position the enemy may be found in: but it is to place you perfectly at ease respecting my intentions, and to give full scope to your judgment for carrying them into effect. We can, my dear Coll, have no little jealousies. We have only one great object in view, that of annihilating our enemies, and getting a glorious peace for our country. No man has more confidence in another than I have in you; and no man will render...
Página 389 - I say these have no right to be tolerated by the magistrate; as neither those that will not own and teach the duty of tolerating all men in matters of mere religion. For what do all these and the like doctrines signify, but that they may, and are ready upon any occasion to seize the government, and possess themselves of the estates and fortunes of their fellowsubjects; and that they only ask leave to be tolerated by the magistrates so long, until they find themselves strong enough to effect it?
Página 458 - May the great God, whom I adore, enable me to fulfil the expectations of my country ; and if it is his good pleasure that I should return, my thanks will never cease being offered up to the throne of his mercy. If it is his good providence to cut short my days upon earth, I bow with the greatest submission, relying that he will protect those so dear to me whom I may leave behind. His will be done. Amen! Amen! Amen!
Página 469 - as that officer, though often sent for, could not leave the deck, Nelson feared that some fatal cause prevented him, and repeatedly cried : " Will no one bring Hardy to me ? He must be killed ! He is surely dead!
Página 477 - Nelson — so the gunner of the Victory called them ; and when, at his interment, his flag was about to be lowered into the grave, the sailors who assisted at the ceremony with one accord rent it in pieces, that each might preserve a fragment while he lived.
Página 467 - Hardy, the chaplain, and the medical attendants. He himself being certain, from the sensation in his back, and the gush of blood...
Página 461 - May the Great God whom I worship, grant to my Country, and for the benefit of Europe in general, a great and glorious Victory; and may no misconduct in anyone tarnish it; and may humanity after Victory be the predominant feature in the British Fleet. For myself individually, I commit my life to Him who made me, and may His blessing light upon my endeavours for serving my Country faithfully.
Página 470 - ten ships have struck, but five of the van have tacked, and show an intention to bear down upon the Victory. I have called two or three of our fresh ships round, and have no doubt of giving them a drubbing." "I hope," said Nelson, "none of our ships have struck?" Hardy answered, "There was no fear of that.
Página 637 - No, no ! The dynasty of Naples has ceased to reign. Its existence is incompatible with the repose of Europe and the honour of my crown.
Página 477 - There was reason to suppose from the appearances upon opening the body, that in the course of nature he might have attained, like his father, to a good old age. Yet he cannot be said to have fallen prematurely whose work was done ; nor ought he to be lamented, who died so full of honours, and at the height of human fame.

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