The Proceedings of the First Annual Convention of the American Federation of Arts: Held at Washington, D.C., May 17, 18, 19, 1910

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Página 77 - Beauty must come back to the useful arts, and the distinction between the fine and the useful arts be forgotten. If history were truly told, if life were nobly spent, it would be no longer easy or possible to distinguish the one from the other. In nature, all is useful, all is beautiful.
Página 38 - That, in proportion as suitable arrangements can be made for their reception, all objects of art and of foreign and curious research, and all objects of natural history, plants, and geological and mineralogical specimens, belonging, or hereafter to belong, to the United States, which may be in the city of Washington...
Página 98 - Than that most noble attribute of man, Though yet untutored and inordinate, That wish for something loftier, more adorned, Than is the common aspect, daily garb, Of human life.
Página 77 - All true Work is sacred ; in all true Work, were it but true hand-labor, there is something of divineness. Labor, wide as the Earth, has its summit in Heaven. Sweat of the brow ; and up from that to sweat of the brain, sweat of the heart ; which includes all Kepler calculations, Newton meditations, all Sciences, all spoken Epics, all acted Heroisms, Martyrdoms, — up to that "Agony of bloody sweat...
Página 77 - Beauty will not come at the call of a legislature, nor will it repeat in England or America its history in Greece. It will come, as always, unannounced, and spring up between the feet of brave and earnest men. It is in vain that we look for genius to reiterate its miracles in the old arts; it is its instinct to find beauty and holiness in new and necessary facts, in the field and road-side, in the shop and mill. Proceeding...
Página 23 - Saxon city has turned over the provision for public recreation to the most evilminded and the most unscrupulous members of the community. We see thousands of girls walking up and down the streets on a pleasant evening with no chance to catch a sight of pleasure even through a lighted window, save as these lurid places provide it. Apparently the modern city sees in these...
Página 77 - Art makes the same effort which a sensual prosperity makes, namely, to detach the beautiful from the useful, to do up the work as unavoidable, and hating it, pass on to enjoyment. These solaces and compensations, this division of beauty from use, the laws of nature do not permit. As soon as beauty is sought not from religion and love, but for pleasure, it degrades the seeker.
Página 39 - I have every reason to believe that you will like my selections, but should any of the examples not hold well, others can be substituted, as it is my desire to have every artist represented at his best. As already intimated, I intend that the present gift may not be considered as final. Additions may be made from time to time as opportunities occur to secure exceptional works.
Página 38 - July 18, 1906, the collections were delivered to the Smithsonian Institution on August 3, 1906, the court deciding that there had been established by the United States of America in the city of Washington a national art gallery within the meaning of Harriet Lane Johnston's will. In 1904, Mr. Charles L. Freer, of Detroit, offered his art collection to the Smithsonian Institution, under certain specified conditions, and also offered to furnish the means for erecting, after his death, a suitable building...
Página 23 - Since the soldiers of Cromwell shut up the people's playhouses and destroyed their pleasure fields, the AngloSaxon city has turned over the provision for public recreation to the most evil-minded and the most unscrupulous members of the community. We see thousands of girls walking up and down the streets on a pleasant evening...

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