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temperature obtainable, -10° F. Principal products handled are milk, cream, butter, eggs, and ice cream.

The Cardston Creamery Association, Cardston: Storage used almost entirely for butter. Mechanical refrigeration equipped with pump brine system. Refrigerated space of 6,400 cubic feet-One room, 32 to 40° F., 3,200 feet; another, 10 to 32° F., approximately the same size.

The Union Packing Co. (Ltd.), Calgary: Private abattoir. Storage capacity, 64,000 cubic feet; cooler, 14,000, for meat.

The Calgary Abattoir and Cold Storage Co. (Ltd.), Calgary: Public abattoir. Refrigerated space of 8,700 cubic feet; cooler, 10,000, for meat.

The Calgary Brewing and Malting Co. (Ltd.), Calgary: Cold store of 205,000 cubic feet, at present leased by P. Burns Meat Packing Co., Calgary.

The Central Creameries (Ltd.), Calgary: Creamery and city dairy, with refrigerated space of 11,500 cubic feet, for butter and ice cream.

CAMPBELLTON DISTRICT

Consul G. C. Woodward, Campbellton, June 14 and July 14, 1923

ICE-MAKING PLANTS

There are no ice-making plants in the Campbellton, New Brunswick, district, which comprises the counties of Restigouche and Gloucester, New Brunswick, and the Gaspe Peninsula, Quebec. Natural ice can be harvested and stored at a low cost and at present there are apparently no prospects for the manufacture of artificial ice.

COLD-STORAGE ESTABLISHMENTS

There are no cold-storage plants in Campbellton, New Brunswick, and immediate vicinity, but there are several in outlying districts. These, with the exception of the three small plants for which summaries are given, simply use salt and ice, commonly known as the brine method. As these establishments exist solely for the temporary storage of fresh fish, there does not appear to be a market in this district for the sale of cold-storage machinery. A description of the three plants follows:

Landry & Corbett, Bathurst, New Brunswick : Fish handled; no imported products. Located 100 yards from wharf and 100 feet from railway; no exjensions considered, as present facilities are sufficient for additional business. Lowest temperature, -3° F.; capacity, 15,000 cubic feet.

Monarch Cold Storage Co. (Ltd.), Shippigan, New Brunswick : Fish handled : no imports; plant situated on railway siding and short distance from wharf, connected therewith by endless chain conveyor; no cartage, facilities sufficient for additional business and no extensions under consideration.

Wick Fisheries (Ltd.), Anse a Beaufils, Gaspe, Co., Quebec: Fish handled : no imports ; cartage by motor truck, one-half mile to railway station ; extensions are under consideration which will make it possible to handle 150,000 pounds instead of 120,000 as at present; otherwise facilities are sufficient for additional business. Capacity between 0 and 10° F., 2,000 cubic feet ; lower than 0° F., 4,000; can freeze cod-liver oil.

CORNWALL DISTRICT

Consul Thomas D. Edwards, Cornwall, June 11, 1923 No ice-making or cold-storage plants are reported for the Cornwall, Ontario, district. Market and fruit dealers regard an icemaking plant as one of the city's necessities, but, so far as is known. none is contemplated.

Consul Norton F. Brand, Fernie, June 6, 1923 No ice-making or cold-storage establishments are reported for the Fernie (British Columbia) district. The Alpine nature of this section insures plenty of natural ice, and no interest is manifested in the erection of plants.

FORT WILLIAM AND PORT ARTHUR DISTRICT

Consul Dudley G. Dwyre, Fort William and Port Arthur, June 12 and 14, 1923

ICE-MAKING PLANTS

In the Fort William and Port Arthur (Ontario) district the summers are short, nights cool, and the majority of households have no refrigerators and require no ice, except, perhaps, for infants' or other food which must be kept in the highest state of preservation. The two cities, however, are important railway divisional and shipping points, with heavy vessel shipments during the navigation season, and trains and vessels must be stocked with ice. Hotels, restaurants, dairies, and confectionery and drug stores use it more or less extensively.'

One concern in each of the cities harvests, stores, and supplies all ice requirements. In the past the long and severe winters afforded excellent opportunity for securing an ample supply of natural ice. The two firms, however, state that it is becoming more difficult each year to harvest this ice. Labor conditions are unsettled, and the authorities continually are forcing them to go a greater distance from the shore of Lake Superior, from which all ice is cut.

The principal ice-cream manufacturer in the district, F. Scollie (Canadian), proprietor, 600 Catherine Street, Fort William, Ontario, has recently installed an ice-making plant and is using the product of his manufacture for making and packing ice cream. Clear ice is not required. Raw-water system and compression are employed. Ice blocks measure 28 by 15 by 7 inches and weight 100 pounds. Equipment was manufactured by Linde Canadian Refrigeration Co. (Ltd.), Montreal. Capacity of plant, 7 tons per 24 hours.

COLD-STORAGE ESTABLISHMENTS

At the present time there are only five cold-storage establishments in the Fort William and Port Arthur district, four of which are located in Fort William and one in Port Arthur. It is not expected that additional warehouses will be erected. Important details for the five plants are given in the following summary:

Swift Canadian Co. (Ltd.), 441 Hardisty Street, Fort William : Canadian subsidiary of the American firm ; handles only Canadian packing-house products and produce; motor trucks used for cartage one-half mile from wharf, over paved street; facilities sufficient for additional business and no extensions contemplated; equipment made by Linde Canadian Refrigeration Co. (Ltd.), Montreal. Capacity, 40° F., or above, 15,000 cubic feet; between 32 and 40° F.,

1 In the question paires consular officers were instructed to state capacities in tons of 2,000 pounds.

37,400; 10 and 32° F., 3,800 ; 0 and 10° F., and lower than 0° F., 17,000; lowest temperature obtainable, -10° F., 17,000.

Gordon Ironsides & Fares Packers (Ltd.), 142 Hardisty Street, Fort William: A Canadian company; Canadian fresh meats, provisions, and produce handled; direct connection with railroad; facilities sufficient for additional business and new extensions contemplated ; equipment from Linde Canadian Refrigeration Co. (Ltd.), Montreal. Capacity between 32 and 40° F., 36,730 cubic feet; 10 and 32° F., 43,468 ; lowest temperature obtainable, 10° F., 43,468.

Gallagher Holman (Ltd.), 208 Simpson Street, Fort William: A Canadian corporation; beef and port products, butter, eggs, and cheese chiefly handled; only imports eggs from the United States in the early spring ; cartage over dirt road by motor truck and horse dray; facilities not sufficient for additional business and extensions are under consideration ; equipment made in the United States. Capacity between 32 and 40° F., 11,700 ; 10 and 32° F., 4,440 ; lowest temperature obtainable, 0° F., 16,140.

Canadian Packing Co., 610 Simpson Street, Fort William: A Canadian firm; principally Canadian products-fresh and frozen beef, pork, lambs, mutton, smoked and cured meats, and produce handled ; direct connection with railroad, with switch at door ; cartage one-quarter mile from wharf over concrete road; facilities for additional business and no extensions under consideration; equipment from Linde Canadian Refrigeration Co. (Ltd.), Montreal. Capacity between 32 and 40° F., 7,920 cubic feet; 10 and 32° F., 7,518; 0 and 10° F., 1,280 ; lowest temperature obtainable, 5° F., 1,280.

Crescent Creamery Co. (Ltd.), Port Arthur: A Canadian firm ; only Canadian products-principally butter, eggs, cheese, poultry, ice cream, milk, and cream-handled; direct connection with railroad, switch at door ; facili. ties sufficient for additional business and no extensions under consideration; equipment from Linde Canadian Refrigeration Co. (Ltd.), Montreal. Ca pacity 40° F. or above, 13,440 cubic feet; between 32 and 40° F., 6,720 : 10 and 32° F., 20,160 ; 0 and 10° F., 6,720; lowest temperature obtainable, 0° F., 6,720.

FREDERICTON DISTRICT Vice Consul Frederick C. Johnson, Fredericton, June 11 and 23, 1923 The Fredericton (New Brunswick) district offers practically no prospect for the erection of an ice-making plant. From the first part of December until early in May the St. Lawrence and its tributaries are frozen to a depth of 3 to 4 feet, and the cutting and storing of ice is one of the principal industries of the winter months.

The district, on the other hand, needs a cold-storage establishment, according to Fredericton dealers in perishable goods. The only cold store in the city was discontinued, and provision firms in this section are obliged to handle food in small quantities and to store perishables in small ice boxes on their premises.

HALIFAX DISTRICT (SEE ALSO SYDNEY)

Consul General Edwin N. Gausaulus, Halifax, June 14 and 23, 1923

ICE-MAKING PLANTS Several natural-ice companies supply ice to Halifax, Nova Scotia, and the surrounding country. There is no interest in the establishment of a plant for the manufacture of artificial ice.

COLD-STORAGE ESTABLISHMENTS

Several of the fish and meat dealers in the City of Halifax have their own refrigerating systems. Outside of these small plants, installed for purely individual purposes, there is only one coldstorage establishment in the district-the North Atlantic Fisheries,

41 Lower Water Street, Halifax. It is a Canadian concern, managed by a Canadian, G. R. Publicover. The principal products handled are Canadian fish and meat of all kinds in about equal proportions. Two wharves have direct connection with the plant. Motor trucks are used for receiving products from the railroad freight station, approximately one-quarter mile from the plant; both motor and horse-drawn trucks transfer them to and from the plant through the city streets. No extensions are contemplated. Machinery was purchased from the Linde British Refrigeration Co. (Ltd.), Toronto. The plant has only two compartments. One has a storage capacity of 77,000 cubic feet, at 10 to 15° F. A part of this space has the brine system, while another section employs air. The other compartment, equipped with air system, is a freezing room of 8.000 cubic-foot capacity, at -8° F.

HAMILTON DISTRICT

Consul Jose de Olivares, Hamilton, July 30 and August 7, 1923

ICE-MAKING PLANTS

The 11 ice-making plants in the Hamilton (Ontario) district, supplemented by local natural ice resources, meet the requirements of this section. Only one extension is planned. No new plants are likely to be built in the near future. A summary of the 11 establishments follows:

The Abso Pure Ice Co. (Ltd.), 15 Bristol Street, Hamilton: A Canadian company; raw-water system, 456 cans, with air agitation, and compression ; size of blocks 50 by 22 by 11 inches, weight 400 pounds; American equipment; extensions planned ; capacity, 50 tons per 24 hours.

Canada Ice & Coal Co. (Ltd.), Bay and Strachan Streets, Hamilton: A Canadian firm, raw water, 324 cans, with air agitation, and compression; size of blocks 54 by 22 by 11 inches, weight 440 pounds; equipment manufactured by an American concern; capacity, 40 tons per 24 hours.

Burke Bros., Mulberry and Railway Streets, Hamilton : Canadian firm ; raw water, 348 cans, without air agitation, and compression; size of blocks 37 by 22 by 10.5 inches, weight 300 pounds; American equipment: capacity, 40 tons per 24 hours.

Fowler's Canadian Co. (Ltd.), Rosemary Street, Hamilton: Canadian; raw water, 360 cans, with air agitation, and compression ; size of blocks 37 by 22 by 10.5 inches, weight 300 pounds; American equipment; capacity, 25 tons per 24 hours.

Cloverdale Creamery (Ltd.), 8 Adams Street, Hamilton: Canadian; raw water, 139 cans, with air agitation, and compression; size of blocks 47 by 12 by 8 inches, weight 200 pounds; American equipment; capacity, 10 tons per 24 hours.

General Hospital, 239 to 279 Barton Street, Hamilton: Raw water, 28 cans, with air agitation, and compression; size of blocks 36 by 8 by 8 inches; weight 50 pounds; American equipment; perpendicular ice machine; capacity, 12 tons per 24 hours.

John T. Mahony Co., 10 Brock Street, Hamilton: Canadian; raw water, 80 cans, with air agitation, and compression; size of blocks 58 by 22.5 by 11.5 inches, weight 400 pounds; American equipment, also Linde British Refrigeration Co. (Ltd.), London, England; capacity, 8 tons per 24 hours.

Mount Hamilton Hospital, Mount Hamilton : Raw water, 20 cans, with air agitation, and compression; size of blocks 36 by 8 by 8 inches, weight 50 pounds; American equipment; perpendicular machine; capacity, 4 tons per 24 hours.

Royal Connaught Hotel, 100 to 114 King Street, Hamilton: American distilled water, 54 cans, and compression; size of blocks 30 by 15 by 7 inches,

weight 100 pounds; equipment from Canadian Ice Machine Co., Toronto; capacity, 20 tons per 24 hours.

The Huether Brewery (Ltd.), Kitchener: Canadian; raw water, 432 cans, with air agitation, and compression; size of blocks 37 by 22 by 10 inches, weight 300 pounds; equipment from Linde Canadian Refrigeration Co. (Ltd.), Montreal; capacity, 30 tons per 24 hours.

Growers' Cold Storage & Ice Co., Grimsby: Canadian; raw water, can system, and compression; size of blocks 44 by 22 by 11 inches, weight approximately 350 pounds; American equipment; capacity, 30 tons per 24 hours.

COLD-STORAGE ESTABLISHMENTS

Seven cold-storage plants are operated in the Hamilton district. Details for each concern follow :

Fowler's Canadian Co. (Ltd.), Rosemary Street, Hamilton: American owner. ship; meats, poultry, fish, butter, and eggs principally handled ; only imports from the United States; siding runs from main railroad line to loading platforms at the plant; facilities for additional business and no extensions under consideration; American equipment. Capacity, 40° F. or above, 50,000 cubic feet; between 32 and 40° F., 48,255 ; 10 and 32° F., 6,173 ; 0 and 10° F., 2,823; lower than 0°, 3,350; lowest temperature obtainable, -14° F., 3,350.

F. W. Fearman & Co. (Ltd.), 226 to 234 Rebecca Street, Hamilton : Canadian; principal products are meats, poultry, fruits, fish, butter, and eggs; only im. ports from the United States ; spur track runs from main railroad track to loading platforms at plant; no extensions planned; part of equipment purchased from an American firm and part from J. McLaughlin, Toronto. Capacity 40° F., or above, 50,000 cubic feet; between 32 and 40° F., 25,000; 10 and 32° F., 5,000; lowest temperature obtainable, -10° F., 1,500.

The Brantford Produce Co. (Ltd.), Brantford: Canadian; only domestic products-meats, fruits, cheese, butter, and eggs-handled; private siding from main railroad line to loading platform at plant; its facilities are not sufficient to handle additional business, and extensions are under consideration. Capacity 40° F. or above, 40,000 cubic feet; between 32 and 40° F., 16,000; 10 and 32° F., 16,000; 0 and 10° F., 32,000; lowest temperature obtainable, 0° F., 32,000.

Growers' Cold Storage & Ice Co., Grimsby: Canadian ; domestic fruits and vegetables handled ; direct switch connections from two railroads to warehouse ; facilities sufficient for additional business and no extensions under consideration. Capacity 40° F. or above, no cubic capacity; between 32 and 40° F., 100,000; 10 and 32° F., 40,000; 0 and 10° F., 10,000; none lower than 0° F.

J. M. Schneider & Sons (Ltd.), Kitchener : Canadian; pork and beef principally handled ; only imports are spices for the preservation of meats; rail. road siding at firm's abattoir, which is within four blocks by paved street of the packing house and cold-storage plant; present establishment is worked to capacity and a new plant is planned ; American equipment. Capacity 40° F. or above, 27,720 cubic feet; between 32 and 40° F., 71,101; 10 and 32° F.. 3,240; 0 and 10° F., none; lowest temperature obtainable, 0° F., 3,240.

The Dumart Packing Co. (Ltd.), Kitchener : Canadian; domestic pork and pork products and provisions principally handled; entire space used for storing company's packing-house products; facilities for a limited amount of additional business and no extensions planned; equipment from Linde Canadian Refrigeration Co. (Ltd.), Montreal. Capacity 40° F. or above, 20,480 cubic feet: between 32 and 40° F., 36,864; 10 and 32° F., 5,120; lowest temperature obtainable, 10° F., 5,120.

Armstrong & Sternaman, Selkirk: Canadian; Butter and eggs principally stored; no imports; Selkirk is located 7 miles from the nearest railroad at Nelles Corners, and therefore the plant depends entirely upon its own cartage facilities—two American trucks to cover the 40 miles of cement road between Selkirk and Hamilton ; additional business can be handled, and no extensions are planned ; equipment from W. A. Freeman & Co. (Ltd.), Hamilton. Capacity, none of 32° F. or above; between 10 and 32° F., 9,024 cubic feet; lowest temperature obtainable, 10° F., 1,275.

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