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Canned fruits, of which pears, peaches, pineapples, and apricots are the leading items, make up the largest group in the exports of canned food. Shipments of canned fruit as a whole were much larger in 1924 than in the two preceding years.

Exports of canned milk are increasing steadily. Evaporated milk leads and amounted to 142,254,000 pounds valued at $12,885,000 in 1924. Condensed milk, a certain percentage of which is shipped in bulk to the bakery trade, amounted in the same year to 64,025,000 pounds valued at $9,250,000.

The increase in the exports of canned sardines is the feature of the trade in canned fish. Canned salmon has been for many years an important export commodity, but only within recent years have sardines attained prominence in this trade. In 1922, the first year for which separate statistics were compiled, exports of canned sardines amounted to 20,060,000 pounds valued at $1,781,000, as compared with 51,261,000 pounds valued at $4,279,000 in 1924.

Canned asparagus and vegetable soups are the only items among canned vegetables of which exports exceed a million dollars a year. Canned vegetables, in general, however, show a tendency to increase.

With the exception of sausage, exports of canned meat show : tendency to decrease. Exports of canned sausage amounted to 3,532,000 pounds valued at $950,000 in 1924.

FRESH FRUITS

Next to cereals and canned foods, fresh fruits show the largest lative gain in the foodstuffs trade of the United States. In the re-war years 1910–1914 fresh fruit made up about 2.4 per cent

the total exports of foodstuffs, whereas in 1924 the proportion as 4.4 per cent. Exports of the principal fresh fruits are shown the table below:

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Apples are the most important of the fruit exports and show the rgest increase. In 1924 exports of this fruit reached the record gure of $24,287,000, as compared with $14,089,000 in 1920 and 5,670,000 for the pre-war average. Boxed apples, for which statistics ave been compiled separately only since 1922, show a particularly pid growth. Boxed apples are exported principally from the Pacific orthwest of the United States, whereas barreled apples come from he Eastern States.

The exports of the other principal fresh fruits-oranges, pears, and erries—also have shown noteworthy increases during the past two ears.

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DRIED FRUIT

The notable features of the export trade in dried fruits have been
the increased shipments of raisins and the enormous exports of dried
prunes in 1924.

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Exports of prunes from the United States in 1924 reached the record
figure of 220,912,000 pounds, valued at $13,218,000. One of the
factors contributing to the unusually high exports was the failure of
the prune crops in France and Bosnia last year. A further factor
was probably the lower export price of prunes. In 1924 the export
price per pound was 6 cents as compared with 8.8 cents in 1923.
the high of 15.6 cents in 1920, and the pre-war average price of 5.5
cents.

Of the various items of trade in dried fruit raisins show the largest
increase in exports as compared with the pre-war trade. The highest
figure was reached in 1922 when 93,891,000 pounds were exported

.
In 1924 the exports amounted to 92,140,000 pounds valued at
$7,027,000. Development of new markets, particularly in the Orient
and increased attention to the export trade in general, account for
the larger shipments of raisins.

Exports of dried apricots have averaged somewhat less since the
war (1920–1924) than during 1910–1914. Dried apples have also
been exported to a lesser extent since the war, whereas exports of
dried peaches have been about the same with the exception of 1924.
when shipments were about twice as large as in previous years.

FEEDS AND FODDERS

Exports of feeds and fodders, of which cottonseed and linseed
cake and meal are the principal items, show a decreasing relatire
importance in the foodstuffs trade. During 1910–1914 these prod-
ucts made up 6.5 per cent of the total foodstuffs exports as compared
with only 3 per cent in 1924.

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The total exports of cottonseed cake and meal averaged 933,288,000
pounds during 1910–1914 as compared with 621,766,000 pounds in
1924. Linseed cake and meal made a somewhat better showing,
with a pre-war average of 661,819,000 pounds and 653,555,000
pounds in 1924. The exports of 1924 were the largest since pre-war
days. Most of the cottonseed and linseed cake and meal goes to
western Europe. A peculiar feature of this trade is the preference
shown by the leading importing nations for one or the other of these
products. The Netherlands, for example, is the leading market for
linseed cake and meal but takes very little cottonseed cake and meal.
Denmark is the leading market for the latter products but takes
practically none of the former. Germany prefers cottonseed cake
and meal, while the United Kingdom favors the linseed products.

The exports of other feedstuffs have been much smaller since the
war than before. The average pre-war exports of bran and mid-
dlings amounted to 54,898 tons valued at $1,577,000, as compared
with 2,644 tons valued at $88,000 in 1924. The United States now
imports more of these products than it exports. Canada is the
source of supply. Exports of dried grains and malt sprouts, which
are by-products of brewing and distilling, averaged 70,975 tons
valued at $1,797,000, as compared with 207 tons in 1922 and no
exports whatever in 1923 and 1924.

VEGETABLES
Vegetables constitute only about 1.5 per cent of the total food-
stuffs exports, but they amount, in the aggregate, to almost $14,000,-
000 a year.

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The principal items of the export trade in vegetables are potatoes, onions, and dried beans and peas. Exports of all these products have been larger since the war than in 1910–1914. Near-by countries --Cuba, Canada, and Mexico-take most of these shipments.

Fresh vegetables other than those shown in the table were exported in 1924 to the amount of 92,074,000 pounds, valued at $3,307,538. Certain vegetable preparations are also included in this class. The exports of yeast, which is the principal vegetable preparation, amounted to 2,699,000 pounds, valued at $701,000, in 1924. In the same year exports of vinegar were valued at $111,000.

DAIRY PRODUCTS

The principal dairy products (with the exception of canned milk, which was considered under canned foods) exported from the United States are butter and cheese. Eggs are also included in this class.

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Eggs show the largest gain over the pre-war trade. Exports of butter have been considerably larger in postwar years. The postwar exports of cheese, with the exception of those of 1924, have also been larger than during 1910–1914.

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