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Hard candies of varied flavors in half-pound glass jars are popular, and lozenges flavored with mint and in shapes are sold in large quantities. Small stocks of chocolates and milk chocolate bars are carried by grocers, novelty stores, and refreshment shops. Careful packing is a requirement of the market, and each piece should be wrapped and incased in tin containers or glass jars.

Because of the size of the market, confectionery is imported through jobbers either in England or Portugal. American confectionery has been imported from time to time, both chocolates and hard candies. Their sales have not been developed, however, due to a lack of interest in the market. A mail campaign might be productive of some results if the market is thought worth developing, but the only effective way of entering the market and stimulating the demand would be a visit by salesmen. Such a visit could be made in connection with one to the markets of South Africa, as it would not be worth while sending a representative to this market alone.

BRITISH EAST AFRICA

Vice Consul Oscar Thomason, Nairobi, Kenya Colony

Imports of confectionery into British East Africa—the colonies of Kenya, Uganda, and Tanganyika-in 1923 amounted to 1,726 hundredweight (1 hundredweight equals 112 pounds). The consumption of locally made chocolates has increased considerably in recent years, and the quality compares favorably with imported grades. Imported candies are practically all of British origin, and no candies from the United States are sold on the market.

BRITISH AND FRENCH WEST AFRICA

Consul W. J. Yerby, Dakar, Senegal

Imports of confectionery into these colonies are small. A few of the stores import small quantities at Christmas time for the European population, but the demand for such products is less now than before the war, and the future demand can only be expected to increase very slowly as the natives are not accustomed to confectionery and do not purchase it.

The confectionery imported for Europeans is mostly fancy chocolates in sealed tins and some hard candies.

The best method of promoting sales would be to have representatives canvass the coast and give samples of products to the dealers, Pictures and posters showing persons eating candy might aid in making known certain brands of candy, as was done in connection with the promotion of sales of condensed milk with good results. Cheap hard candies in air-tight jars, in order that the contents might be seen, should find a good market in West Africa.

ANGOLA, PORTUGUESE AFRICA

Vice Consul Francis H. Styles, Loanda Chocolate is the principal confectionery product imported into Angola. Of this, about 90 per cent is imported from England. Other than chocolate, the only kind of confectionery selling on the market is candied fruit. There is no local industry.

The customs duty is 20 per cent ad valorem, and 35 per cent is added by the retailer to delivered costs. Payment against documents is the usual method of sale. Prices should be quoted c. i. f. Angola ports. Due to the present unfavorable rate of exchange this market does not hold good prospects for the sale of American goods. Exclusive agencies should be granted to dealers handling products in Angola.

MADAGASCAR
Consul James G. Carter, Tananarive:

Due to the development of the local industry in Madagascar, importations of confectionery have decreased in recent years. In 1923 importations of chocolate amounted to 35,318 pounds, and imports of sirups, bonbons, and candies to 133,819 pounds. France controls about 90 per cent of the chocolate trade of the island, with small quantities from Switzerland. England supplies the largest share of the bonbons and other confectionery. The increased French customs duties applicable in Madagascar have a tendency to discourage the importation of foreign goods. In addition to the customs duty, the local consumption tax on chocolates and other confectionery is 0.50 franc per kilo (1 kilo equals 2.2 pounds).

It is not believed that sales of American confectionery could be developed in Madagascar, with the free entry of French goods, under present conditions of exchange. Lack of direct sailing from the l'nited States makes it difficult for confectionery to arrive in good condition.

OFFICES OF THE BUREAU OF FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC COMMERCE

DISTRICT OFFICES

New York : 734 Customhouse.
Boston : 1801 Customhouse.
Chicago: Room 830, 76 West Monroe Street.
St. Louis : 1210 Liberty Central Trust Co. Building.
New Orleans : 214 Customhouse.
San Francisco: 510 Customhouse.
Seattle: 515 Lowman Building.
Atlanta : 538 Post Office Building.
Philadelphia: Room 812, 20 South Fifteenth Street.
Detroit: No. 1 Customhouse.

COOPERATIVE OFFICES

Akron, Ohio: Chamber of Commerce.
Balt: more, MD.: Association of Commerce.
Birmingham, Ala. : Chamber of Commerce.
Bridgeport, Conn.: Manufacturers' Association.
Charleston, S. C.: Chamber of Commerce.
Chattanooga, Tenn.: 1301 Market Street.
Cincinnati, Ohio: Chamber of Commerce.
Cleveland, Ohio: Chamber of Commerce.
Columbus, Ohio: Chamber of Commerce.
Dallas, Tex. : Chamber of Commerce.
Dayton, Ohio: Chamber of Commerce.
El Paso, Tex. : Chamber of Commerce.
Erie, Pa.: Chamber of Commerce.
Fort Worth, Tex.: Chamber of Commerce.
Indianapolis, Ind. : Chamber of Commerce.
Jacksonville, Fla. : Chamber of Commerce.
Los Angeles, Calif,: Chamber of Commerce.
Milwaukee, Wis. : Assoc'ation of Commerce.
Mobile, Ala. : Chamber of Commerce.
Muncie, Ind.: Chamber of Commerce.
Newark, N. J.: Chamber of Commerce.
Norfolk, Va.: Hampton Roads Maritime Exchange.
Orange, Tex.: Chamber of Commerce.
Pensacola, Fla. : Chamber of Commerce.
Pittsburgh, Pa.: Chamber of Commerce.
Portland, Oreg.: Chamber of Commerce.
Providence, R. I. : Chamber of Commerce.
Richmond, Va.: Chamber of Commerce.
Rochester, N. Y.: Chamber of Commerce.
San Diego, Calif.: Chamber of Commerce.
Syracuse, N. Y.: Chamber of Commerce.
Toledo, Ohio: Chamber of Commerce.
Trenton, N. J.: Chamber of Commerce.
Worcester, Mass. : Chamber of Commerce.

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CARIBBEAN MARKETS FOR AMERICAN

GOODS

I. CENTRAL AMERICA

By

HECTOR LAZO CHIEF, CARIBBEAN SECTION, LATIN

AMERICAN DIVISION

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

BUREAU OF FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC COMMERCE

Trade Information Bulletin-No. 329

Supplement to Commerce Reports

Price, 10 cents

INTRODUCTION

The Caribbean region, comprising the West Indies, Central America, Venezuela, and the Caribbean section of Colombia, is as much a distinctive trade area for the American manufacturer as Canada or Australia. This region or group of countries, while contiguous to the other countries of Latin America, has very little direct contact with them because of the fact that most of the established lines of water transport treat the Caribbean area as a separate unit. Steamers bound for Brazil and the River Plate do not enter the Caribbean ports, and steamers routed to the Caribbean rarely go farther south than the Venezuelan ports before returning to the United States or Europe. A traveling salesman covering Latin America will, of course, visit the Caribbean territory as well as the rest of South America, but it will mean a break in his journey and a transfer from one transportation system or group of steamship lines to another. Freight shipments from eastern and southern United States to this territory in practically every instance are made by steamers routed only to Caribbean ports. The growing trade of the Caribbean area with the Pacific ports of the United States is by the way of Colon in the Canal Zone as a port of transshipment, no direct routes from the west coast to the Caribbean Sea having yet been established.

The importance of the Caribbean countries is shown by our trade with them during 1924, which amounted to $875,958,041, of which $510,212,009 represented imports from and $365,746,032 exports to them. In order of importance, Cuba ranks first, Porto Rico second, Colombia third, and the Central American group fourth.

This pamphlet, the first of a series covering Caribbean markets, is an analysis of Central America as a purchaser of American goods. For the convenience of the exporter planning a trip for himself or his representative a suggested salesman's route through Central America has been included. Further information on any specific points may be had by applying to the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce at Washington or to any of its district and cooperative offices throughout the country.

JULIUS KLEIN, Director. APRIL, 1925.

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