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The original records and books of the batteries and companies now in service will be continued, the change of designation being noted thereon. New record bouks will be supplied to additional batteries and companies when organized.

III. An additional artillery band will be organized, composed as heretofore authorized by law, for artillery regiments, by the commanding officer, Fort Columbus, New York Harbor, to be designated the Eighth Band, Artillery Corps, and will be stationed for the present at that post. By command of Lieutenant-General Miles:

H. C. CORBIN,

Adjutant-Genera..

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GENERAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,

ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE,
No. 26.

Washington, March 8, 1901.
The following act of Congress is published for the information and government of
all concerned:
AN ACT making appropriation for the support of the Army for the fiscal year ending June thirtieth,

nineteen hundred and two. * Provided further, That in fulfillment of the declaration contained in the joint resolution approved April twentieth, eighteen hundred and ninety-eight, entitled, “For the recognition of the independence of the people of Cuba, demanding that the Government of Spain relinquish its authority and government in the island of Cuba, and to withdraw its land and naval forces from Cuba and Cuban waters, directing the President of the United States to use the land and naval forces of the United States to carry these resolutions into effect," the President is hereby authorized to "leave the government and control of the island of Cuba to its people” so soon as a government shall have been established in said island under a constitution which, either as a part thereof or in an ordinance appended thereto, shall define the future relations of the United States with Cuba, substantially as follows:

1. That the government of Cuba shall never enter into any treaty or other compact with any foreign power or powers which will impair or tend to impair the independence of Cuba, nor in any manner authorize or permit any foreign power or powers to obtain by colonization or for military or naval purposes or otherwise, lodgment in or control over any portion of said island.

II. That said government shall not assume or contract any public debt, to pay the interest upon which, and to make reasonable sinking fund provision for the ultimate discharge of which, the ordinary revenues of the island, after defraying the current expenses of government shall be inadequate.

III. That the government of Cuba consents that the United States may exercise the right to intervene for the preservation of Cuban independence, the maintenance of a government adequate for the protection of life, property, and individual liberty, and for discharging the obligations with respect to Cuba imposed by the treaty of Paris on the United States, now to be assumed and undertaken by the government of Cuba.

IV. That all acts of the United States in Cuba during its military occupancy thereof are ratified and validated, and all lawful rights acquired thereunder shall be maintained and protected.

V. That the government of Cuba will execute, and as far as necessary extend, the plans already devised or other plans to be mutually agreed upon, for the sanitation of the cities of the island, to the end that a recurrence of epidemic and infectious diseases may be prevented, thereby assuring protection to the people and commerce of Cuba, as well as to the commerce of the southern ports of the United States and the people residing therein.

VÍ. That the Isle of Pines shall be omitted from the proposed constitutional boundaries of Cuba, the title thereto being left to future adjustment by treaty.

VII. That to enable the United States to maintain the independence of Cuba, and to protect the people thereof, as well as for its own defense, the government of Cuba will sell or lease to the United States lands necessary for coaling or naval stations at certain specified points, to be agreed upon with the President of the United States.

VIII. That by way of further assurance the government of Cuba will embody the foregoing provisions in a permanent treaty with the United States.

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Provided, That appointments to fill original vacancies in the lowest grade in the Adjutant-General's Department, the Inspector-General's Department, and Judge

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Advocate-General's Department, and in the grade of captain in the Quartermaster's Department, Subsistence Department, and Pay Department may be made from officers of volunteers commissioned since April twenty-first, eighteen hundred and ninetyeight, and the age limit prescribed as to chaplains shall not apply to persons who served as chaplains of volunteers after said date who were under forty-two years of age when originally appointed.

For additional ten per centum increase on pay of officers serving at foreign stations, five hundred thousand dollars: Prorided, That hereafter the pay proper of all officers and enlisted men serving beyond the limits of the States comprising the Union, and the Territories of the United States contiguous thereto, shall be increased ten per centum for officers and twenty per centum for enlisted men over and above the rates of pay proper as fixed by law for time of peace, and the time of such service shall be counted from the date of departure from said States to the date of return thereto. Provided further, That the officers and enlisted men who have served in China at any time since the twenty-sixth day of May, nineteen hundred, shall be allowed and paid for such service the same increase of pay proper as is herein provided for: Prorided further, That enlisted men receiving or entitled to the twenty per centum increased pay herein authorized shall not be entitled to or receive any additional increased compensation for what is known as extra or special duty.

* All military, civil, and judicial powers necessary to govern the Philippine Islands, acquired from Spain by the treaties concluded at Paris on the tenth day of December, eighteen hundred and ninety-eight, and at Washington on the seventh day of November, nineteen hundred, shall, until otherwise provided by Congress, be vested in such person and persons and shall be cxercised in such manner as the President of the United States shall direct, for the establishment of civil government and for maintaining and protecting the inhabitants of said islands in the free enjoyment of their liberty, property, and religion: Provided, That all franchises granted under the authority hereof shall contain a reservation of the right to alter, amend, or repeal the same.

Until a permanent government shall have been established in said archipelago full reports shall be made to Congress on or before the first day of each regular session of all legislative acts and proceedings of the temporary government instituted under the provisions hereof; and full reports of the acts and doings of said government, and as to the condition of the archipelago and of its people, shall be made to the President, including all information which may be useful to the Congress in providing for a more permanent government: Provided, That no sale or lease or other disposition of public lands or the timber thereon or the mining rights therein shall be made: And provided further, That no franchise shall be granted which is not approved by the President of the United States, and is not in his judgment clearly necessary for the immediate government of the islands and indispensable for the interest of the people thereof, and which can not, without great public mischief, be postponed until the establishment of permanent civil government; and all such franchises shall terminate one year after the establishment of such permanent civil government.

Al laws or parts of laws inconsistent with the provisions of this act are hereby repealed.

Approved, March 2, 1901.
By command of Lieutenant-General Miles:

H. C. CORBIN,

Adjutant-General.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,

ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE,
No. 30.

Washington, March 12, 1901. I. By direction of the Secretary of War, the First Battalion, Thirtieth United States Infantry, will, under the direction of the commanding general, Department of California, be immediately organized at the Presidio of San Francisco from the infantry recruits now available at that post and prepared for early service in the Division of the Philippines.

II. By direction of the Secretary of War, the following-named troops heretofore designated for service in the Division of the Philippines will proceed from San Francisco, Cal., to Manila, Philippine Islands, as follows:

Company D, Tenth United States Infantry, in addition to First Battalion, Twentyeighth United States Infantry, already ordered, on transport Indiana, sailing about the 15th instant.

Headquarters, band, and First and Third squadrons, Fifth United States Cavalry, and Troops A and B, Fifteenth United States Cavalry, on transport Meade, sailing about the 16th instant.

First and Third battalions (seven companies), Tenth United States Infantry, on transport Pennsylvania, sailing about the 18th instant.

The commanding general, Department of California, will arrange the details of the movements and report by telegraph to the Adjutant-General of the Ar the hours of departures and strength of organizations.

The Quartermaster's Department will furnish the necessary transportation, the Subsistence Department suitable subsistence, and the Medical Department proper medical attendance and supplies. By command of Lieutenant-General Miles:

H. C. CORBIN, Adjutant-General, Major-General, United States Army.

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GENERAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,

ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE,
No. 31.

Washington, March 13, 1901. I. By direction of the Secretary of War, the headquarters of the Division of the Philippines will be designated by a standard of khaki-colored silk or bunting, measuring 3 feet on the staff and 4 feet 6 inches fly, cut swallow-tailed 12 inches to the fork, bearing in the center two circles overlapping each other, one-third radius, resembling the figure 8, 1 foot 6 inches high and of corresponding width. The symbol to be in red,

bordered in white 14 inches and edged in blue inch, surmounted by a red scroll bearing the device "Division of the Philippines” embroidered in blue letters.

Total length of lance to be 9 feet, including spearhead and ferrule.

II. By direction of the Secretary of War, paragraphs 928 and 937 of the Regulations are am ed to read as follows:

928. Commanding officers will before forwarding charges personally investigate them and by indorsement on the charges will certify that they have made such investigation, and whether in their opinion the charges can be sustained. Before referring charges for which the maximum limit of punishment that may be awarded is greater than one month's forfeiture and confinement to inferior courts for trial, commanding officers will cause the accused to sign a statement on the original charges as to whether or not he consents to trial by summary court. A note of this statement in each case will also be entered on the record of the summary court and on the monthly report of trials by such court.

937. Whenever under the summary court act or the 83d Article of War it becomes necessary to convene a garrison or regimental court the order appointing it will state the facts which bring the cases to be tried within the exceptions of those laws. By command of Lieutenant-General Miles:

H. C. CORBIN, Adjutant-General, Major-General, United States Army.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,

ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE,
No. 37.

Washington, March 20, 1901. By direction of the Secretary of War, the telegraphic instructions to department commanders of the 18th instant, transferring the following-named troops to the Division of the Philippines and directing they be sent to San Francisco, Cal., in ample time to sail from there on the dates specified in each case, are confirmed:

First Infantry.—Third Battalion, from the Department of the Missouri; Companies K and L to sail on the transport Kilpatrick April 5, 1901; Companies I and M on the transport Logan April 15, 1901.

Fifth Infantry. - The lieutenant-colonel and second battalion, from the Department of the Lakes, to sail on the transport Buford April 1, 1901. This battalion will be filled, as nearly as practicable, to the maximum by assignment of recruits and by voluntary transfers from the Twenty-ninth United States Infantry.

Seventh Infantry.Companies C and M, from the Department of the Columbia; Company D, from the Department of the Colorado; and Company H, from the Department of California, to sail on the transport Hancock March 25, 1901.

Eleventh Infantry.--Headquarters, field, staff, band, and first and third battalions from the Department of the East; headquarters, field, staff

, band, and third battalion to sail on the transport Kilpatrick April 5, 1901; the first battalion on the transport Logom April 15, 1901.

Sixth Cavalry. - Second squadron, Troops E and H, from the Department of the Columbia, and Troops F and G, from the Department of California, to sail on the transport Hancock March 25, 1901.

Ninth Cavalry. Third squadron, from the Department of the Colorado, to sail on the transport Logan April 15, 1901.

Tenth Cavalry: --Second squadron, from the Department of Texas, to sail on the transport Logan April 15, 1901.

Fifteenth Cavalry. -- Troops C and D, from the Department of California, to sail on the transport Buford April 1, 1901.

Troops and companies will, as far as practicable, be filled to the maximum by assignment of recruits or transfers. Officers and men unfit for active service, and enlisted men who have three months or less to serve and who have not signified their intention to reenlist, will be left at stations; noncommissioned officers left behind will not be reduced in consequence thereof.

Department commanders will by concert of action arrange details of movements, provide troops temporarily for posts which would be left without sufficient garrisons, and report hours of departure and arrival and strength of commands by telegraph to the Adjutant-General of the Army.

Company commanders will make every proper effort to induce enlisted men going to the Philippine Islands who have relatives dependent upon them to make allotments of pay, as provided for in General Orders, No. 149, August 17, 1899, from this office, reporting their names to the Adjutant-General of the Army.

Property left behind by the troops will be securely packed, marked, and listed in duplicate.

The Quartermaster's Department will furnish the necessary transportation, the Subsistence Department suitable subsistence, and the Medical Department proper medical attendance and supplies. By command of Lieutenant-General Miles:

H. C. CORBIN, Adjutant-General, Major-General, United States Army.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,

ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE,
No. 50.

Washington, April 9, 1901. By direction of the Secretary of War, the following order from the War Department is published to the Army for the information and guidance of all concerned:

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, April 9, 1901. Pursuant to section 6 of the act of February 2, 1901, entitled "An act to increase the efficiency of the permanent military establishment of the United States," the duties of the chief of artillery are hereby prescribed:

1. He shall keep the Commanding General of the Army, and through him the Secretary of War, advised at all times of the efficiency of the personnel and materiel of the artillery, and make such recommendations in reference thereto as shall in his judgment tend to promote efficiency.

2. He shall annually, and as frequently as circumstances shall require, inspect the coast and field artillery, and he shall from time to time, and as frequently as once in each year, report to the Commanding General, and through him to the Secretary of War, as to each coast-defense fortification, whether the same is in all respects ready for use in case of attack, and if not, in what respects the preparations are defective.

3. He shall from time to time, and as frequently as conditions require, confer directly with the Chief of Ordnance, and advise him of all matters relating to the character and preparation of artillery materiel which the experience and observation of the artillery arm of the service show to be of practical importance.

4. He shall have general supervision of the instruction of artillery officers and men and of examinations for promotion and for appointments and transfers of offcers to the artillery arm, and shall recommend such examinations and such courses and methods of instruction in the artillery schools and otherwise as he shall deem requisite to secure a thoroughly trained and educated force.

5. He shall recommend officers for duty in coast or field artillery according to special aptitude and fitness, and is charged generallv with the recommendation of officers of artillery for special duty.

6. Before any money is expended or any land is acquired for any seacoast fortification hereafter he shall advise the Secretary of War, through the Commanding General, whether the project under which the expenditure is to be made includes adequate provision for all the different elements of a complete coast-defense establishment, including fortification, armament, and accommodations for the use of troops; whether the land which it is proposed to acquire will be sufficient for all the purposes mentioned, and how far the appropriations available provide for the entire work. For that purpose all projects and plans for coast-defense fortifications shall upon coming into the office of the Secretary of War be referred as of course in the first instance to the Chief of Artillery for his report thereon.

7. He shall be a member of the Board of Ordnance and Fortification. 8. The records pertaining to the performance of the duties of the Chief of Artillery will be kept in the office of the Adjutant-General of the Army, through whom all communications relating to personnel, discipline, efficiency, transfers, and assignments should be made, in accordance with existing regulations.

9. Nothing in these regulations shall be deemed to relieve the commanders of the several military departments of the duties of inspection and command, or of responsibility for the condition and efficiency of the materiel and personnel of the artillery in their several departments, as now provided by regulations.

Elihu Root,

Secretary of War By command of Lieutenant-General Miles:

H. C. CORBIN, Adjutant-General, Major-General, United States Army.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,

ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE,
No. 52.

Washington, April 17, 1901.
I. By direction of the Secretary of War, the following paragraphs are added to the
Regulations:

TRAVEL ALLOWANCES.

1321}. Actual expenses only will be paid to officers for sea travel whea traveling to, from, or between our island possessions. An itemized statement of such expenses will be filed with each voucher for payment as follows:

1. Fares upon commercial steamers, steamship lines, or other usual modes of conveyance by sea.

2. Cost of customary stateroom accommodations on commercial steamers when the same is not included in the travel fare.

3. Hire of special water transportation when there are no regular means of conveyance.

4. Actual cost of meals, not to exceed $4.50 per day, for the time actually and unavoidably consumed in the voyage when the same is not included in the travel fare. Actual cost of meals on Government transports. A reasonable fee to cabin and stateroom stewards will be allowed on commercial lines of steamers; the payment of such fees on Government transports is not authorized. Subvouchers, properly receipted, will be required for the above items when the total cost exceeds $1. When not practicable to obtain such subvouchers the officer will so certify.

CONTRACT DENTAL SURGEONS.

13954. Candidates for appointment as dental surgeons must be not less than twentyfour nor more than forty years of age. They must be graduates of standard medical colleges, trained in the several branches of dentistry, of good moral and professional character, and prior to appointment will be required to pass a satisfactory professional examination before a board of dental surgeons convened for that purpose by the Secretary of War.

Contracts with dental surgeons will be made for three years, but may be annulled at any time by the commanding general of a military department, after official investigation, for conduct to the prejudice of good order and military discipline, or by the Surgeon-General when in his opinion a termination of the contract would be in the interests of the service.

Dental surgeons are attached to the medical department and will be assigned to duty in accordance with the recommendations of the Surgeon-General of the Army or the chief surgeon of a military department.

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