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4. Volunteer soldiers discharged under the provisions of this order will be entitled to travel allowances for the land travel involved from place of discharge to place of enlistment in the Volunteers, their discharges being given for the interests of the public service. They may be reenlisted in the Regular Army as herein provided without special authority from this office, the provisions of paragraph 838, clause 1, of the Regulations being waived in their cases. Their discharge certificates and final statements will show as cause for discharge, "services no longer required.”

5. The cases of former enlisted men of Volunteers who are over 35 years of age and seek to enter the Regular Army more than three months after discharge will be governed by paragraph 838, clause 3, of the Regulations; but when discharged Volunteer soldiers reenlist in the Regular Army within three months after discharge, the age limitation does not apply and the applicants need not sign the declaration of recruit on the enlistment form.

6. The indorsement required, pursuant to paragraph 836 of the Regulations, on the enlistment papers of men who have served in the Volunteers and subsequently enlist in the Regular Army, results in giving such soldiers credit on the records of the Department for time actually served in the Volunteers; but the term of enlistment or reenlistment in the Regular Army is not shortened by reason of their Volun. teer service. They begin a new enlistment in the Regular Army for the full term of three years, and their clothing allowance likewise begins at the first year's rates. The principal advantages, however, accrue to those who reenlist in the Regular Army within three months from date of discharge from the Volunteers. In their cases the time actually served in the Volunteers is added to the time served in the Regular Army in computing the soldier's service pay, from time to time. For example:

Suppose John Smith to have served four months in the Volunteers and within three months after discharge therefrom to have reenlisted in the Regular Army, serving as a private. He would complete two years' continuous service upon serving one year and eight months in the Regular Army (with pay proper at $13 per month). He would then

enter upon the third year of continuous service, during which he would be entitled to $14 per month. With the expiration of two years and eight months of his new enlistment he would complete three years' continuous service and enter upon the fourth year, entitling him to $15 per month. After serving four months in this fourth year his three years' term of enlistment would expire. Should he again reenlist within three months from date of discharge the first eight months of such enlistment would complete his fourth year of continuous service at $15 per month. During the next year—the fifth year of continuous service he would draw $16 per month, and after its close would become entitled to another $2 per month for five years' continuous service, i. e., $18 per month. Each subsequent period of five years' continuous service would entitle him to $1 per month additional.

The pay proper for the noncommissioned grades is subject to like increase for continuous service.

To the rates of pay named above 20 per cent of the pay proper is to be added in the cases of enlisted men serving in Porto Rico, Cuba, the Philippine Islands, Hawaii, and in the Territory of Alaska. In the case of a private this would be $2.60 per month. By command of Lieutenant-General Miles:

H. C. CORBIN, Ailjutant-General.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,

ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE,
No. 9.

Washington, February 6, 1901.
The following act of Congress is published for the information and government of
all concerned:
AN ACT to increase the efficiency of the permanent military establishment of the United States.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That from and after the approval of this act the Army of the United States, including the existing organizations, shall consist of fifteen regiments of cavalry, a corps of artillery, thirty regiments of infantry, one Lieutenant-General, six major-generals, fifteen brigadier-generals, an Adjutant-General's Department, an Inspector-General's Department, a Judge-Advocate-General's Department, a Quartermaster's Department, a Subsistence Department, a Medical Department, a Pay Department, a Corps of Engineers, an Ordnance Department, a Signal Corps, the officers of the Record and Pension Office, the chaplains, the officers and enlisted men of the Army on the retired list, the professors, corps of cadets, the army detachments and band at the United States Military Academy, Indian scouts as now authorized by law, and such other officers and enlisted men as may hereinafter be provided for: Provided, That when a vacancy shall occur through death, retirement, or other separation from active service in the office of storekeeper, now provided for by law in the Quartermaster's Department and Ordnance Department, respectively, said office shall cease to exist.

SEC. 2. That each regiment of cavalry shall consist of one colonel, one lieutenantcolonel, three majors, fifteen captains, fifteen first lieutenants, and fifteen second lieutenants; two veterinarians, one sergeant-major, one quartermaster-sergeant, one commissary-sergeant, three squadron sergeants-major, two color sergeants with rank, pay, and allowances of squadron sergeant-major, one band, and twelve troops organized into three squadrons of four troops each. Of the officers herein provided, the captains and lieutenants not required for duty with the troops shall be available for detail as regimental and squadron staff officers and such other details as may be authorized by law or regulations. Squadron adjutants shall receive one thousand eight hundred dollars per annum and the allowances of first lieutenant; squadron quartermasters and commissaries shall receive one thousand six hundred dollars per annum and the allowances of second lieutenants. Each cavalry band shall be organized as now provided by law. Each troop of cavalry shall consist of one captain, one first lieutenant, one second lieutenant, one first sergeant, one quartermastersergeant, six sergeants, six corporals, two cooks, two farriers and blacksmiths, one saddler, one wagoner, two trumpeters, and forty-three privates; the commissioned officers to be assigned from among those hereinbefore authorized: Provided, That the President, in his discretion, may increase the number of corporals in any troop of cavalry to eight, and the number of privates to seventy-six, but the total number of enlisted men authorized for the whole Army shall not at any time be exceeded.

SEC. 3. That the regimental organization of the artillery arm of the United States Army is hereby discontinued, and that arm is constituted and designated as the Artillery Corps. It shall be organized as hereinafter specified and shall belong to the line of the Army.

SEC. 4. That the Artillery Corps shall comprise two branches-the coast artillery and the field artillery. The coast artillery is defined as that portion charged with the care and use of the fixed and movable elements of land and coast fortifications, including the submarine mine and torpedo defenses, and the field artillery as that portion accompanying an army in the field, and including field and light artillery proper, horse artillery, siege artillery, mountain artillery, and also machine-gun batteries: Provided, That this shall not be construed to limit the authority of the Secretary of War to order coast artillery to any duty which the public service demands or to prevent the use of machine or other field guns by any other arm of the service under the direction of the Secretary of War.

Sec. 5. That all officers of artillery shall be placed on one list, in respect to promotion, according to seniority in their several grades, and shall be assigned to coast or to field artillery according to their special aptitude for the respective services.

SEG. 6. That the Artillery Corps shall consist of a chief of artillery, who shall be selected and detailed by the President from the colonels of artillery, to serve on the staff of the general officer commanding the Army, and whose duties shall be prescribed by the Secretary of War; fourteen colonels, one of whom shall be the chief of artillery; thirteen lieutenant-colonels, thirty-nine majors, one hundred and ninetyfive captains, one hundred and ninety-five first lieutenants, one hundred and ninetyfive second lieutenants; and the captains and lieutenants provided for in this section not required for duty with batteries or companies shall be available for duty as staff officers of the various artillery garrisons and such other details as may be authorized by law and regulations; twenty-one sergeants-major, with the rank, pay, and allowances of regimental sergeants-major of infantry; twenty-seven sergeants-major, with the rank, pay, and allowances of battalion sergeants-major of infantry; one electrician sergeant to each coast artillery post having electrical appliances; thirty batteries of field artillery, one hundred and twenty-six batteries of coast artillery, and ten bands organized as now authorized by law for artillery regiments: Provided, That the aggregate number of enlisted men for the artillery, as provided under this act, shall not exceed eighteen thousand nine hundred and twenty, exclusive of electrician sergeants.

Sec. 7. That each company of coast artillery shall be organized as is now prescribed by law for a battery of artillery: Provided, That the enlisted strength of any company may be fixed, under the direction of the Secretary of War, according to the requirements of the service to which it may be assigned: And provided, That firstclass gunners shall receive two dollars a month, and second-class gunners one dollar per month in addition to their pay.

Sec. 8. That each battery of field artillery shall be organized as is now prescribed by law, and the enlisted strength thereof shall be fixed under the direction of the Secretary of War.

Sec. 9. That the increase herein provided for the artillery shall be made as follows: Not less than twenty per centum before July first, nineteen hundred and one, and not less than twenty per centum each succeeding twelve months until the total number provided for shall have been attained. All vacancies created or caused by this act shall be filled by promotion according to seniority in the artillery arm. Second lieutenants of infantry or cavalry may, in the discretion of the President, be transferred to the artillery arm, taking rank therein according to date of commission, and such transfers shall be subject to approval by a board of artillery officers appointed to pass upon the capacity of such officers for artillery service Provided, That the increase of officers of artillery shall be only in proportion to the increase of men.

SEC. 10. That each regiment of infantry shall consist of one colonel, one lieutenantcolonel, three majors, fifteen captains, fifteen first lieutenants, and fifteen second lieutenants; one sergeant-major, one quartermaster-sergeant, one commissary-sergeant, three battalion sergeants-major, two color sergeants, with rank, pay, and allowances of battalion sergeants-major, one band, and twelve companies, organized into three battalions of four companies each. Of the officers herein provided, the captains and lieutenants not required for duty with the companies shall be available for detail as regimental and battalion staff officers and such other details as may be authorized by law or regulations. Battalion adjutants shall receive one thousand eight hundred dollars per annum and the allowances of first lieutenants, mounted; battalion quartermasters and commissaries shall receive one thousand six hundred dollars per annum and the allowances of second lieutenants, mounted. Each infantry band shall be organized as now provided by law. Each infantry company shall consist of one captain, one first lieutenant, one second lieutenant, one first sergeant, one quartermaster-sergeant, four sergeants, six corporals, two cooks, two musicians, one artificer, and forty-eight privates, the commissioned officers to be assigned from those herein before authorized: Provided, That the President, in his discretion, may increase the number of sergeants in any company of infantry to six, the number of corporals to ten, and the number of privates to one hundred and twenty-seven, but the total number of enlisted men authorized for the whole Army shall not, at any time, be exceeded.

SEC. 11. That the enlisted force of the Corps of Engineers shall consist of one band and three battalions of engineers. The engineers band shall be organized as now provided by law for bands of infantry regiments. Each battalion of engineers shall consist of one sergeant-major, one quartermaster-sergeant, and four companies. Each company of engineers shall consist of one first sergeant, one quartermaster-sergeant, with the rank, pay, and allowances of sergeant, eight sergeants, ten corporals, two musicians, two cooks, thirty-eight first-class and thirty-eight second-class privates: Provided, That the President may, in his discretion, increase the number of sergeants in any company of engineers to twelve, the number of corporals to eighteen, the number of first-class privates to sixty-four, and the number of second-class privates to sixty-four, but the total number of enlisted men authorized for the whole Army shall not, at any time, be exceeded: And provided, That officers detailed from the Corps of Engineers to serve as battalion adjutants and battalion quartermasters and commissaries shall, while so serving, receive the pay and allowances herein authorized for battalion staff officers of infantry regiments.

Sec. 12. That the President is authorized to appoint, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, chaplains in the Army, at the rate of one for each regiment of cavalry and infantry in the United States service and twelve for the corps of artillery, with the rank, pay, and allowances of captains of infantry: Provided, That no person shall be appointed a chaplain in the Regular Army who shall have passed the age of forty years, nor until he shall have established his fitness as required by existing law: And provided, That the office of post chaplain is abolished, and the officers now holding commissions as chaplains, or who may hereafter be appointed chaplains shall be assigned to regiments or to the corps of artillery. Chaplains may be assigned to such stations as the Secretary of War shall direct, and they may be transferred, as chaplains, from one branch of the service or from one regiment to another by the Secretary of War, without further commission. When serving in the field, chaplains shall be furnished with necessary means of transportation by the Quartermaster's Department.

Sec. 13. That the Adjutant-General's Department shall consist of one AdjutantGeneral with the rank of major-general, and when a vacancy shall occur in the office of Adjutant-General on the expiration of the service of the present incumbent, by retirement or otherwise, the Adjutant-General shall thereafter have the rank and pay

WAR 1901-VOL 1, PT II-6

of a brigadiei -general, five assistant adjutants-general with the rank of colonel, seven assistant adjutants-general with the rank of lieutenant-colonel, and fifteen assistant adjutants-general with the rank of major: Provided, That all vacancies created or caused by this section shall, as far as possible, be filled by promotion according to seniority of officers of the Adjutant-General's Department.

Sec. 14. That the Inspector-General's Department shall consist of one InspectorGeneral with the rank of brigadier-general, four inspectors-general with the rank of colonel, four inspectors-general with the rank of lieutenant-colonel, and eight inspectors-general with the rank of major: Provided, That all vacancies created or caused by this section shall be filled, as far as possible, by promotion according to seniority of officers of the Inspector-General's Department.

SEC. 15. That the Judge-Advocate-General's Department shall consist of one JudgeAdvocate-General with the rank of brigadier-general, two judge-advocates with the rank of colonel, three judge-advocates with the rank of lieutenant-colonel, six judgeadvocates with the rank of major, and for each geographical department or tactical division of troops not provided with a judge-advocate from the list of officers holding permanent commissions in the Judge-Advocate-General's Department one acting judge-advocate with the rank, pay, and allowances of captain, mounted. Promotions to vacancies above the grade of major, created or caused by this Act, shall be mad.", according to seniority, from officers now holding commission in the JudgeAdvocate General's Department. Vacancies created or caused by this act in the grade of major may be filled by appointment of officers holding commissions as judge-advocate of Volunteers since April twenty-first, eighteen hundred and ninetyeight. Vacancies which may occur thereafter in the grade of major in the JudgeAdvocate-General's Department shall be filled by the appointment of officers of the line, or of persons who have satisfactorily served as judge-advocates of Volunteers since April twenty-first, eighteen hundred and ninety-eight, or of persons from civil life who at date of appointment are not over thirty-five years of age and who shall pass a satisfactory examination to be prescribed by the Secretary of War.

Acting judge-advocates provided for herein shall be detailed from officers of the grades of captain or first lieutenant of the line of the Army who while so serving shall continue to hold their commissions in the arm of the service to which they permanently belong. Upon completion of a tour of duty not exceeding four years they shall be returned to the arm in which commissioned, and shall not be again detailed until they shall have completed two years' duty within the arm of the service in which commissioned.

SEC. 16. That the Quartermaster's Department shall consist of one QuartermasterGeneral with the rank of brigadier-general, six assistant quartermasters-general with the rank of colonel, nine deputy quartermasters-general with the rank of lieutenantcolonel, twenty quartermasters with the rank of major, sixty quartermasters with the rank of captain, mounted; the military storekeeper now provided for by law, and one hundred and fifty post quartermaster-sergeants: Provided, That all vacancies in the grade of colonel, lieutenant-colonel, and major created or caused by this section shall be filled by promotion according to seniority, as now prescribed by law. That to fill original vacancies in the grade of captain created by this act in the Quartermaster's Department the President is authorized to appoint officers of volunteers commissioned in the Quartermaster's Department since April twenty-first, eighteen hundred and ninety-eight: Provided further, That the President is authorized to continue in service, during the present emergency, for duty in the Philippine Islands and on transports, twenty-four captains and assistant quartermasters of volunteers. This authority shall extend only for the period when their services shall be absolutely necessary.

Sec. 17. That the Subsistence Department shall consist of one Commissary-General with the rank of brigadier-general, three assistant commissaries-general with the rank of colonel, four deputy commissaries-general with the rank of lieutenant-colonel, nine commissaries with the rank of major, twenty-seven commissaries with the rank of captain, mounted, and the number of commissary-sergeants now authorized by law, who shall hereafter be known as post commissary-sergeants: Provided, That all vacancies in the grades of colonel, lieutenant-colonel, and major created or caused by this section, shall be filled by promotion according to seniority, as now prescribed by law. That to fill original vacancies in the grade of captain created by this act in the Subsistence Department, the President is authorized to appoint officers of volunteers commissioned in the Subsistence Department since April twenty-first, eighteen hundred and ninety-eight.

Sec. 18. That the Medical Department shall consist of one Surgeon-General with the rank of brigadier-general, eight assistant surgeons-general with the rank of colonel, twelve deputy surgeons-general with the rank of lieutenant-colonel, sixty sur

geons with the rank of major, two hundred and forty assistant surgeons with the rank of captain or first lieutenant, the Hospital Corps, as now authorized by law, and the Nurse Corps: Provided, That all vacancies in the grades of colonel, lieutenant-colonel, and major created or caused by this section shall be filled by promotion according to seniority, subject to the examination now prescribed by law. And provided, That the period during which any assistant surgeon shall have served as a surgeon or assistant surgeon in the Volunteer Army during the war with Spain or since shall be counted as a portion of the five years service required to entitle him to rank of captain: And provided also, That nothing in this section shall affect the relative rank for promotion of any assistant surgeon now in the service, or who may be hereafter appointed therein, as determined by the date of his appointment or commission and as fixed in accordance with existing law and regulations: Provided further, That in emergencies the Surgeon-General of the Army, with the approval of the Secretary of War, may appoint as many contract surgeons as may be necessary, at a compensation not to exceed one hundred and fifty dollars per month. That on or after the passage of this act the President may appoint for duty in the Philippine Islands, fifty surgeons of volunteers with the rank and pay of major, and one hundred and fifty assistant surgeons of volunteers with the rank and pay of captain, mounted, for a period of two years: Provided, That so many of these voluntee medical officers as are not required shall be honorably discharged the service wherever in the opinion of the Secretary of War their services are no longer necessary: Provided further, That assistant surgeons in the Volunteer Army of the United States commissioned by the President as captains, in accordance with the provisions of an act for increasing the efficiency of the Army of the United States, and for other purposes, approved March second, eighteen hundred and ninety-nine, shall be entitled to the pay of a captain, mounted, from the date of their acceptance of such commission, as prescribed by law: Provided, That the Surgeon-General of the Army, with the approval of the Secretary of War, be, and he is hereby, authorized to employ dental surgeons to serve the officers and enlisted men of the Regular and Volunteer Army, in the proportion of not to exceed one for every one thousand of said Army, and not exceeding thirty in all. Said dental surgeons shall be employed as contract dental surgeons under the terms and conditions applicable to army contract surgeons, and shall be graduates of standard medical or dental colleges, trained in the several branches of dentistry, of good moral and professional character, and shall pass a satisfactory professional examination: Provided, That three of the number of dental surgeons to be employed shall be first appointed by the Surgeon-General, with the approval of the Secretary of War, with reference to their fitness for assignment, under the direction of the Surgeon-General, to the special service of conducting the examinations and supervising the operations of the others; and for such special service an extra compensation of sixty dollars a month will be allowed: Provided further, That dental college graduates now employed in the Hospital Corps who have been detailed for a period of not less than twelve months to render dental service to the Army and who are shown by the reports of their superior officers to have rendered such service satisfactorily may be appointed contract dental surgeons without examination: Provided, That the Secretary of War be authorized to appoint in the Hospital Corps, in addition to the two hundred hospital stewards now allowed by law, one hundred hospital stewards: Provided, That men who have served as hospital stewards of volunteer regiments or acted in that capacity during and since the Spanish-American war for more than six months may be appointed hospital stewards in the Regular Army: And provided further, That all men so appointed shall be of good moral character and shall have passed a satisfactory mental and physical examination.

SEC. 19. That the nurse corps (female) shall consist of one superintendent, to be appointed by the Secretary of War, who shall be a graduate of a hospital training school having a course of instruction of not less than two years, whose term of office may be terminated at his discretion, whose compensation shall be one thousand eight hundred dollars per annum, and of as many chief nurses, nurses, and reserve nurses as may be needed. Reserve nurses may be assigned to active duty when the emergency of the service demands, but shall receive no compensation except when on such duty: Provided, That all nurses in the nurse corps shall be appointed or removed by the Surgeon-General, with the approval of the Secretary of War; that they shall be graduates of hospital training schools, and shall have passed a satisfactory, professional, moral, mental, and physical examination: And provided, That the superintendent and nurses shall receive transportation and necessary expenses when traveling under orders; that the pay and allowances of nurses, and of reserve nurses when on active service, shall be forty dollars per month when on duty in the United States and fifty dollars per month when without the limits of the United

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