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years, and of the state five years, and thirty years of age. — Senators. A citizen of the United States, of the state two years, and of the district where chosen the last year, having paid a state or county tax, and twenty-five years of age. Representatives. A citizen of the United States, and of the state and county where chosen one year, having paid a state or county tax, and twentyone years of age.

ILLINOIS. - Governor. A citizen of the United States thirty years, and of the state two years, thirty years of age, and ineligible for two successive terms. — Senators. A citizen of the United States, and of the district where chosen the last year, having paid a state or county tax, and twenty-five years of age. Representatives. A citizen of the United States, and an inhabitant of the state and county where chosen, having paid a state or county tax, and twenty-one years of age.

Missouri. — Governor. A native citizen of the United States, a resident of the state four years, and thirty-five years of age.

- Senators. A citizen of the United States, of the state four years, and of the district where chosen one year, having paid a state or county tax, and thirty years of age. Representatives. A citizen of the United States, of the state two years, and of the county where chosen one year, having paid a state or county tax, and twenty-four years of age.

Michigan. Governor. A citizen of the United States five years, and a resident of the state the last two years. - Senators. A citizen of the United States, and a qualified voter in the county where chosen.

Representatives. Same as the senators. ARKANSAS. Governor. A native citizen of the United States, or a resident of the state ten years previous to the adoption of the constitution, and four years preceding the election. - Senators. A citizen of the United States, a resident of the state one year, and thirty years of age. Representatives. A citizen of the United States, a resident of the county where chosen, and twenty-five years of age.

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The Capitol of the United States, at Washington, is situated on an area including thirty acres. The building stands on the western portion of the ground, and commands a beautiful and extensive view of the city, the surrounding country, and the windings of the Potomac. The entire space is enclosed by an iron railing of substantial workmanship.

The building itself is three stories in height. The first is, a rusticated basement, crowned by two others, comprised within an elevation of pillars and pilasters of the Corinthian order. These columns are thirty feet in height, forming a noble portico on the eastern side, of one hundred and sixty feet in extent. The whole building is surrounded by a balustrade of stone, and crowned by a lofty dome in the centre, and a flat one upon each wing.

The representatives' hall is situated in the second story of the south wing. Its form is semicircular; the chord of the longest dimension being ninety-six feet, and the height of the ceiling at the most elevated point, sixty feet. The room is surrounded by twenty-four columns of variegated native marble, from the banks of the Potomac, with capitals of white Italian marble, which stand on freestone bases, and support a magnificent dome, painted in a style designed to represent that of the Pantheon at Rome. The speaker's chair is situated at one side of the hall, elevated to a level with a broad promenade, which extends about the sides of the room, and is bounded by pillars and pilasters of stone. The hall is ornamented with a chandelier in the centre, a colossal figure of Liberty, in plaster; the American eagle, in stone ; a statue, in marble, representing History; a magnificent

portrait of Lafayette; and various other works of art from native and foreign hands. The senate chamber is situated in the north wing. Its form is semicircular. Its greatest length is seventy-two feet, and its greatest height forty-two. A series of Ionic columns support a gallery on the eastern side, and form a sort of promenade below, while a new gallery of iron pillars and railing projects from the circular wall. The room is ornamented by elegant tapestry, the richest stucco work, and a great variety of marble columns of the finest workmanship. The rotunda occupies the centre of the building, and is ninetysix feet in diameter, and ninety-six feet high. This is the great thoroughfare of the building, and leads to the halls of legislation and the library. The circumference of this room is divided into panels by lofty Grecian pilasters, which support an entablature ornamented by wreaths of olives, the whole crowned with a hemispherical dome, resembling the dome of the Pantheon at Rome. These panels are ornamented with four historical paintings of great value, commemorating some of the most important scenes of the revolution. These o were executed by order of the United States' government, by Col. Trumbull, an officer of the revolution, and for several years an aid to the commander-in-chief. The pictures themselves are grand in the extreme, and are calculated to produce a powerful effect on the mind of every man who has any proper sense of the difficulties of those times, and the grandeur of the prize for which so many millions were contending. These paintings are considered of great value. The first represents the signing of the Declaration of Independence, with portraits of the signers, their dress corresponding with the fashion of the times, tapestry of the room, taken from that in which congress assembled at the time, with a background representing military flags, and other trophies, which had been taken from the enemy. The second painting is the surrender of Gen. Burgoyne. It represents Gen. Burgoyne, attended by several officers, arriving near the marquee of Gen. Gates. Gen. Gates has advanced a few steps to meet his prisoner, who has dismounted, and is in the act of offering his sword. Gen. Gates declines to receive the sword, and invites them to enter his tent and partake of refreshments. In the background are seen troops crossing the country, companies making their appearance behind the woods, and a great variety of bo American and British officers performing each his part of the ever-memorable scene. The third painting is the surrender of Lord Cornwallis at Yorktown. It represents the scene at the moment when the principal officers of the British army are passing between two

groups of French and American generals to the place where their arms were to be surrendered. The principal officers of the three nations are therefore brought near together, and admit of distinct and separate portraits. In the distance is seen the entrance of the town, a glimpse of York River, and the entrance of Chesapeake Bay. In the last painting, Gen. Washington is represented as resigning his commission as commander-in-chief of the American army. After leaving the rotunda, we pass westerly along the gallery of the principal stairway, to the library-room. This room is ninety-two feet long, thirty-four feet wide, and thirty-six feet high. It is divided into twelve arched alcoves, ornamented with fluted pilasters, resembling the Octagon tower at Athens. Within the room are four pillars of stone, which support the galleries extending nearly the whole length of the room on both sides, and divided into the same number of shelved recesses as the lower apartment. The arched roof corresponds with the alcoved form of the room, and is ornamented with the richest stucco work, wreaths of flowers, &c. The whole room is handsomely furnished with sofas, tables, desks, and carpeting. The library, at present, comprises about fourteen thousand volumes. The Supreme Court room is on the basement story of the north wing, immediately under the senate room. Its form is semicircular, with an arched ceiling diverging, like the radii of a cir cle, from the central point over the bench of the judges. Besides the rooms already mentioned, are twenty-seven others, appropriated to different purposes, for the officers of the two houses of congress and the Supreme Court, and forty-five to the use of committees. The building having been situated, originally, on the declivity of a hill, the west front showed an elevation one story of rooms below the level of the east front and ends. To remedy this defect, a range of casement arches has been projected, in a semicircular form, on the west, and a paved terrace formed over them, which, at a short distance, gives the building the appearance of resting on a uniform level. The dimensions of the grounds and building are the following. Ground within the railing, thirty acres; length of the footwalk outside the railing, one thousand five hundred and five feet; length of the building, three hundred and fifty-two feet and four inches; depth of wings, one hundred and twenty-one feet and six inches; east projection and steps, sixty-five feet; west projection and steps, eighty-three feet; area of building, one and a half acres and one thousand eight hundred and twenty feet; height of the wings, seventy feet; height of centre dome, one hundred and forty-five feet.

The following is the cost of the building, with the time of erection. North wing, commenced in 1793, finished in 1800, cost, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $480,262 57 South wing, commenced in 1803, finished in 1808, 308,808 41 Centre building, commenced in 1818, finished in - - - - - - - 957,647 35

1827. . . . . Total, . . . $1,746,718 33

The seat of government was removed to Washington in 1800, during the administration of John Adams, and the city was incorporated in 1802. In 1814, congress determined by vote that the government should remain permanently at this place. From that time the most liberal appropriations were made for completing the necessary buildings, and for the general prosperity of the city.

There is, perhaps, no city in the Union that has so many pleasant heights surrounding it as Washington. The line of highlands in the vicinity presents to the eye the form of a horse-shoe; the Potomac, more than a mile in width, forming the opening at the south. The heights afford the most delightful country seats, which present from the metropolis a splendid appearance. The city itself is situated at the head of tide-water navigation, near the centre of the seaboard line, and has a ready communication with the ocean. Springs of pure water are in abundance; the territory and the convenience of Intercourse with every part of the republic is surpassed by that of no point in the Union.

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