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From the Painting by \_a1ul_\‘ke, in the collection of the Duke of .\lanchester,

at Kimliolton Castle, lluntingdonshire.

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to direct the movements of the armies, that they won over the Presbyterian leaders, Essex and Holles, to look favourably on a scheme for bringing an accusation against Cromwell as an incendiary who was doing his best to divide the King from his people, and one of the kingdoms from" the other—an incendiary being liable to punishment by the law of Scotland. At a meeting held at Essex House the Scottish Earl of Loudoun asked the English lawyers present whether such a one was also punishable by the law of England. The English lawyers threw cold water on the scheme, \Vhitelocke asking to see the evidence on which the charge was founded, whilst Maynard declared that “Lieutenant-General Cromwell is a person of great favour and interest with the House of Commons, and with some of the Peers likewise, and therefore there must be proofs, and the most clear and evident against him, to prevail with the Parliament to adjudge him to be an incendiary.” It is plain that neither \Vhitelocke nor Maynard were eager to bell the cat.

Cromwell replied by a renewed attack on Manchester’s inefficient generalship. Yet it was not in accordance with the character of the man who had stopped the headlong rush of his squadrons at Marston Moor to allow a great public cause to be wrecked by personal recriminations. On December 9, Zouch Tate, himself a strong Presbyterian, reported from a committee which had been appointed to consider the questions at issue between the two generals, “ that the chief causes of our division are pride and covetousness.” It is immaterial whether Tate had or had not come to a previous understanding with Cromwell to damp down the fires of controversy which threatened to rend the Parliamentary party into warring factions. \’Vhat was of real importance IS that Cromwell followed with an admission that, unless the war was brought to a speedy conclusion, the kingdom would become weary of Parliament. “For what,” he added, “do the enemy say? Nay, what do many say that were friends at the beginning of the Parliament? Even this, that the members of both Houses have got great places and commands and a sword into their hands, and, what by interest of Parliament, and

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