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requirement of accurate conformity to the Calvinistic standard of belief. It was sufficient for him, if his associates found inspiration in a sense of personal dependence on God, issuing forth in good and beneficent deeds. _

W'hen, in 1628, Cromwell took his seat in the House of Commons he would be sure of a good reception as a cousin of Hampden. There is, however, nothing to surprise us in his silence during the eventful debates on the Petition of Bight. He was no orator by nature, though he could express himself forcibly when he felt deeply, and at this time, and indeed during the whole of his life, he felt more deeply on religious than on political questions. The House, in its second session held in 1629, was occupied during the greater portion of its time with religious questions, and it was then that Cromwell made his first speech, if so short an utterance can be dignified by that name. “Dr. Beard,” he said, “told him that one Dr. Alablaster did at the Spital preach in a sermon tenets of Popery, and Beard being to repeat the same, the now Bishop of Winton, then Bishop of Lincoln, did send for Dr. Beard, and charged him as his diocesan, not to preach any doctrine contrary to that which Alablaster had delivered, and when Beard did, by the advice of Bishop Felton, preach against Dr. Alablaster’s sermon and person, Dr. Neile, now Bishop of Winton, did reprehend him, the said Beard, for it.”

The circumstances of the time give special biographical importance to the opening of this window into Cromwell’s mind. The strife between the Puritan clergy and the Court prelates was waxing high. The latter were contending for a broader religious teaching than that presented by Calvin’s logic; but knowing that they were in a comparatively small minority they, perhaps not unnaturally, fell back on the protection of the King, who was in ecclesiastical matters completely under the influence of Laud. The result of Charles’s consultations with such Bishops as were at hand had been the issue of a Declaration which was prefixed to a new edition of the articles, and is to be found in Prayer Books at the

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From the Painting by Robert Walker, in the collection of the Earl of S&lIl(l\vlCll, at

Hinchingbrooke.

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