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WASHINGTON AFTER THE REVOLUTION

MDCCLXXXIV—MDCCXCIX

BY WILLIAM SPOHN BAKER

AUTHOR OF “ ITINERARY OF GENERAL WASHINGTON, 1775– 1783,” “EARLY SKETCHES OF GEORGE WASHINGTON,” “ENGRAVED PORTRAITS OF WASHINGTON,” “MEDALLIC PORTRAITS OF WASHINGTON,” “ CHARACTER PORTRAITS OF WASHINGTON," BIBLIOTHECA WASHINGTONIANA,ETC.

J. B. LIPPINCOTT COMPANY PHILADELPHIA MDCCCXCVIII

COPYRIGHT, 1898,

BY

HENRY WHELEN, JR.

THE

NEW YORK
PUBLIC LIBRARY

Astor, Lenox and Tilden

Foundations,

1898.

11370

INTRODUCTORY NOTE.

On the 23d day of December, 1783, Washington resigned his commission as Commander-in-Chief of the armies of the Revolution to the Congress of the United States, then in session at Annapolis, Maryland. After a simple but most impressive ceremony, made memorable by the singular beauty and dignity of his address, he left for Mount Vernon, where he arrived toward the close of the following day. It was the evening before Christmas when Washington returned to that home which through the long and weary struggle was ever in his mind, and where he hoped, to use his own words, “to spend the remainder of his days in cultivating the affections of good men, and in the practice of the domestic virtues.” But the end was not yet! There was to be but a brief period of repose; other and more trying years were before him; other and more trying duties were to be imposed. But when they came, when the new duties and responsibilities were to be met, the old firmness and courage, judgment and decision, were displayed, and, strong alike in peace as in war, the great soul, responsive to the call, was found equal to the task.

We propose, as a sequel to the Itinerary of the Revolution (1775–1783), to follow Washington through the remaining years of his life, keeping our notes as closely as possible to his personal movements, although at times it may be difficult to separate his public acts from those of a more private and personal nature.

PHILADELPHIA.

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