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ERRATA.

Page 21, line 329_Angelicanæ, read Anglicanæ.

30, 35,-motre, read matre.
38, 14,—1608, read 1648.
53, - 16,-meditated, read mediated.
06, 8,-restored to health, but he, read restored to health :" But bei
121, - 28,—Sir Henry Wotton, read Sir Edward Wotton.
132, 20,—Angli, read Anglia.
146, - 27-July 25, read July 27.

-- July 27, read July 31.
147, — 25,-KIII. read XIII.
176, 32,-Dr. Marter, read Dr. Martin Luther.
181, - 20,-Odvardo, read Odoardo.
- 21,-lango, read lungo.

22--fa, read fu.

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WALTON'S LIVES.

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LORD BISHOP OF WINCHESTER, AND PRELATE OF THE

MOST NOBLE ORDER OF THE GARTER?..

MY LORD,

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Did some years past, present you with a plain relation of

the life of Mr. Richard Hooker, that humble man, to whose memory princes, and the most learned of this nation, have paid a reverence at the mention of his name.---And now, with Mr. Hooker's, I present you also the life of that pattern of primitive piety, Mr. George Herbert; and, with his, the life of Dr. Donne, and your friend Sir Henry Wotton, all reprinted. ---The two first were written under your roof; for

which

a Dr. George Morley, distinguished by his unshaken loyalty and attachment to Charles I. . was, at the Restoration, first made Dean of Christ-church, and then Bishop of Worcester. In 1662 he was translated to the see of Winchester. Though nominated one of the Assembly of Divines, he never did them the honour, nor himself the injury, to sit among them. During his absence from his native country, he endeared himself to several learned foreigners, : particularly to Andrew Rivettus, Heinsius, Salmasius, and Bochart. He constantly attended the young exiled King; but not being permitted to follow him into Scotland, he retired to Antwerp, where for about three or four years he read the service of the Church of England twice every day, cátechized once a week, and administered the communion once a month to all the English in the town who could come to it, regularly and strictly observing all the parochial duties of a clergyman, as he did afterwards at Breda for four years together. Walker, in his History of the Sufferings of the Clergy, having quoted Anthony Wood's character of this prelate, concludes with this exclamation : “ ( that but a single portion of “his spirit might always rest on the established clergy!” He died in 1684.

(Le Neve, Fuller, and Wood.)

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