Presidential Powers

Portada
NYU Press, 2005 M02 1 - 279 páginas

Framed in Article II of the Constitution, presidential powers are dictated today by judicial as well as historical precedent. To understand the ways the president wields power as well as how this power is kept in check by other branches of government, Harold J. Krent presents three overlapping determinants of the president's role under the Constitution-the need for presidential initiative in administering the law and providing foreign policy leadership, the importance of maintaining congressional control over policymaking, and the imperative to ensure that the president be accountable to the public.
Krent’s examination is sweeping, ranging from the president's ability to appoint and remove executive branch officials, to the president's role in proposing and implementing treaties and the power to conduct war, to the extent the president can refuse to turn over information in response to congressional and judicial requests. Finally, Krent addresses the history and purposes of presidential pardons.
By drawing on historic and contemporary presidential actions to illustrate his points, Krent reminds us that the president is both an exalted leader with the regalia of power and an American who is and should be accountable to fellow citizens-important considerations as we elect and assess our presidents.

 

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

No encontramos ningún comentario en los lugares habituales.

Contenido

Introduction
1
1 The Presidents Power to Execute the Laws Passed by Congress
17
2 The Executives Power over Foreign Affairs
85
3 The Protective Power of the President
133
4 Presidential Immunities and Priviledges
161
5 The Pardon Power
189
Conclusion
215
Notes
219
Bibliography
261
Index
269
Derechos de autor

Otras ediciones - Ver todas

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 14 - My view was that every executive officer, and above all every executive officer in high position, was a steward of the people, bound actively and affirmatively to do all he could for the people, and not to content himself with the negative merit of keeping his talents undamaged in a napkin.

Acerca del autor (2005)

Harold J. Krent is dean and professor of law at the Chicago-Kent College of Law.

Información bibliográfica