Studies in the Narrative Method of Defoe, Volumen9

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University of Illinois, 1924 - 248 páginas
 

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Página 98 - I believe it was the first gun that had been fired there since the creation of the world...
Página 165 - THE MEMOIRS OF AN ENGLISH OFFICER, Who serv'd in the Dutch War in 1672 to the Peace of Utrecht, in 1713. Containing Several Remarkable TRANSACTIONS both by Sea and Land, and in divers Countries, but chiefly those wherein the Author was personally concern'd.
Página 47 - Hence man may be properly said to be alone in the midst of the crowds and hurry of men and business. All the reflections which he makes are to himself; all that is pleasant he embraces for himself; all that is irksome and grievous is tasted but by his own palate.
Página 201 - The most important of all the sources of the "Memoirs," from which came the pretended observations of Carleton upon Spanish customs and places, and upon which were based his adventures as a prisoner of war, is a work entitled, "The ingenious and diverting Letters of the Lady Travels into Spain. Describing the devotions, nunneries, humours, customs .... and recreations of that people. Intermixt with great variety of modern adventures, and surprising accidents. . . ." This interesting composition of...
Página 222 - . . . . what words .... could serve to paint our passions, or our expectations?" In the second chapter of the "Storm" Defoe treats "of the opinions of the ancients that this island was more subject to storms than other parts of the world...
Página 168 - Philip Henry, Earl of Stanhope, History of England comprising the Reign of Queen Anne, I (1872), p. 217, note 7; John Hill Burton, Reign of Queen Anne II (1880), p. 173; FW Wyon, History of Great Britain during the Reign of Queen Anne, I (1876), pp.
Página 166 - Johnson said, he had never heard of the book. Lord Eliot had it at Port Eliot; but, after a good deal of inquiry, procured a copy in London, and sent it to Johnson, who told Sir Joshua Reynolds that he was going to bed when it came, but was so much pleased with it, that he sat up till he had read it through, and found in it such an air of truth, that he could not doubt of its...
Página 34 - I was now entered on the seven and twentieth year of my captivity. . . ." Notice that Crusoe refers to his condition as one of 'captivity.' There are similar expressions common to both which have to do with their arrangements to secure food and shelter. Says Knox : "Now having settled all business about my allowance, my next concern was to look after a house more convenient, for my present one was too small to dress my victuals in, and to sleep in too ... ";36 ". . . . and so (I) began to settle...
Página 36 - That we were but flesh and blood .... and that .... we were cut off from all marriages anywhere else, even for our lifetime, and therefore that we must marry with these or with none at all. ... These reasons being urged, there was none among us that could object aught against them, especially if those that were minded to marry women here, did take them for their wives during their lives, as some of them say, they do ; and most of the women they marry are such as do profess themselves to be...
Página 165 - THE MEMOIRS OF AN ENGLISH OFFICER, Who Serv'd in the Dutch War in 1672. to the Peace of Utrecht, in 1713. Containing Several Remarkable Transactions both by Sea and Land, and in divers Countries, but chiefly those wherein the Author was personally concern'd.

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