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Central Missouri Teachers' Association.

75

Chicago Division, Illinois State Teachers' Association.

74

Eddy County (N. Dak.), Teachers' Association.--

73

Elementary School Principals' Association, Kansas City, Mo.-

73

General Federation of Women's Clubs --

245
General Grand Chapter, Order of the Eastern Star-

244

Harris County (Tex.) Teachers' Association..

74

Lions Club of Tooele, Utah.---

246
Mahaska County (Iowa) Teachers' Association.

73
Masonic Club of Jacksonville, Fla--

246
Men's Club of Highland Park (Mich.) Teachers.

247

Missouri State School Administrative Association.

75

National Congress of Parents and Teachers..

244

National Council of Jewish Women...

244

New York State Congress of Parents and Teachers..

247

New York State Federation of Women's Clubs..

245

Norfolk (Va.) Education Association..

74

Northeastern convention district, Pennsylvania State Education Associa-

tion.-

75

Northern section, California Teachers' Association..

74

Northwest Missouri Teachers' Association...

75

Pacific Conference, Woman's Missionary Council, Methodist Episcopal

Church, South -

248

Parent-Teacher Association of Lewistown, Mont.--

247

Portland (Oreg.) Federation of Women's Organizations..

246

Providence (R. I.) Central Federated Union, petition of.

507

Providence (R. I.) Men's High School Teachers' Association, petition of.. 507

Providence (R. I.) Teachers' Council, petition of ..

507

Rhode Island Home Economics Association, petition of.

507

Rhode Island State Federation of Labor, petition of.---

506

Rhode Island State Federation of Women's Clubs, resolution and petition

of..

245, 508

San Diego County (Calif.) Federation of Women's Clubs --

245

San Francisco (Calif.) regional conference, department of classroom

teachers, National Education Association.

73

South-Central Missouri Teachers' Association.

75

South Dakota Branch, National Congress of Parents and Teachers-

248

Southeast division, Minnesota Education Association.

75

Southeast Missouri Teachers' Association...

75

Southeastern Ohio Teachers' Association....

75

Southern section, California Teachers' Association..

74

Southwest Missouri Teachers' Association...

75

Steuben County (N. Y.) Schoolmasters' Association.--

73

Technical High School Parent-Teachers' Association, Providence, R. I.,

petition of

506

Ten-County Congress of Pennsylvania Parent-Teacher Association,

Everett, Pa..

247

Texas Congress of Mothers and Parent-Teacher Associations.

248

Travis County (Tex.) Council of Women.--

246

Weber County (Utah) Teachers' Association.

74

West Virginia Federation of Women's Clubs_-

245

Woman's Missionary Council, Methodist Episcopal Church, South.

248

Woonsocket Round Table Club, Rhode Island, petition of.

507
List of letters received by Chairman Reed in favor of H. R. 7.

528

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STATEMENTS OF OPPONENTS OF THE BILL

Abbott, Dr. Wilbur C..

Albers, Dean Homer...

Brenckman, Mr. Frederick.

Cadwalader, Mr. Thomas F.

Candler, Bishop Warren A.

Dolle, Mr. Charles F.

Dore, Mr. Edward S.

Gibbs, Mrs. Rufus W.

I III

434

348

415

346

350

358

395

446

PROPOSED DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION,
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,
Wednesday, April 25, 1928.

1928. The committee this day met, Hon. Daniel A. Reed (chairman) presiding

The CHAIRMAN. The committee will come to order. This is a hearing on H. R. 7, a bill introduced by the chairman of this committee to create a department of education, and for other purposes. If there is no objection, I will reserve the right to make a statement as author of the bill, to go into the hearings, and will not take the time of the committee now. This morning we are to hear those who are in favor of the bill, and when they have concluded, whether it be to-day or later, those who are opposed to the bill will have their opportunity to come in and be heard fully.

STATEMENT OF DANIEL A. REED, CHAIRMAN COMMITTEE ON

EDUCATION, HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

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Mr. REED. The committee has met to consider House bill H. R. 7, known as the education bill. This bill, or others somewhat like it, has been before Congress for the past eight or nine years, and I know it is the hope of the members of the committee that we may at this hearing get some light on the bill-its provisions, why it is necessary, and how it would work.

1. We know that the Federal Government has always been interested in the promotion of education and we want to ascertain if the purpose of this bill means in any sense a departure from the established policy of the Federal Government.

2. The United States has supported a Bureau of Education in the Department of the Interior for more than a half century. If this bureau is not adequate the committee wants to know in what ways it is inadequate and what remedy, if any, the present bill proposes for this inadequacy.

3. The present bill provides for scientific investigations or research in various fields. What would be the advantages of such research study to the country as a whole and to the different types of education?

4. The committee would like any light that it can receive on the question of the constitutionality of the present bill, especially if there are any provisions in the bill that place control of education in any way with the secretary of education.

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5. The members of the committee would like to know how the present bill would affect private and sectarian schools throughout the country

6. The committee wants to know whether or not the present bill is tied in with the proposal for Federal aid or whether in the judgment of those who are proponents of the measure the question of Federal aid is entirely independent of the present measure.

7. The committee would like to know definitely who are in favor of this bill and who are against it, together with facts, reasons, and arguments held by opposing groups.

If the committee can get light on the foregoing matters, the members will be in much better position to form a definite opinion as to the desirability of the bill.

STATEMENT OF DR. WILLIAM M. DAVIDSON, SUPERINTENDENT

OF SCHOOLS, PITTSBURGH, PA., AND CHAIRMAN LEGISLA-
TIVE COMMISSION, NATIONAL EDUCATION ASSOCIATION

Mr. SEARS. Doctor Davidson had charge of our Omaha schools before he went to Pittsburgh, and no man in the State of Nebraska is esteemed any higher educationally and otherwise than Doctor Davidson.

Mr. LEATHERWOOD. The same applies to Kansas.

Doctor DAVIDSON. I am glad to see my two friends from Nebraska and Kansas here. The last hearing held by your committe on this bill happened to fit in precisely with the annual meeting of the National Education Association, which was in session in Washington at that time. That fact caused a very large group of school men and women to be present at the former hearing, showing how deep the interest was in this proposed legislation so far as the National Education Association group itself is concerned.

As the chairman of the legislative commission of the National Education Association I have invited only a very small group of representative school men and women to be present at this time. Some of them will participate in the hearing this morning and some this afternoon, while the other members of our group will not reach Washington until tomorrow. This is in accordance with the plan which we thought had met with your approval, Mr. Chairman, when it was agreed that the two days, April 25 and 26, should be set aside for the proponents of the Curtis-Reed bill. I should like to open the hearing with a statement that covers briefly the history of the whole movement looking toward the creation of a secretaryship in the President's Cabinet.

The movement for creation of a department of education is no newly advanced theory of the teaching profession. Rather, it is a century old idea that is known to have been favored by our third President, Thomas Jefferson, and by other leaders of his day. As early as 1838 Henry Barnard, of Connecticut, began urging establishment in the Federal Government of some agency to collect and disseminate educational facts and statistics. This agitation kept up during the succeeding years until 1854 when a plan for the establishment of a department of education was formulated and presented at the annual meeting of the Association for the Advancement of

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