Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

They might not agree with him all together, one might go one way and another go another way, but they would have consultation as to what the results of research meant, and they would have the means of distribution of research results to their own States. Thank you

very much.

Mr. LEATHERWOOD. I wanted to ask you just one question. Do you advocate the adolescent instruction outlined here (indicating pamphlet page 67]?

Doctor FAIRCHILD. That was not taken from the results of our research. That part was produced by the committee in Nebraska.

Mr. LEATHERWOOD. Do you think it should have a place in the public schools?

Doctor FAIRCHILD. It would be merely a matter of opinion on my part. We are trying to get out of the range of “opinionism," and into generalizations verified by research.

Doctor DAVIDSON. I would like to say a word about the last speaker to whom you have listened. His father was president of the State Agricultural College of Kansas, the institution from which the present Secretary of Agriculture comes. He has been an outstanding advocate of the type of work which he has just presented to you.

I thank you for the courteous manner in which you have received all our representatives during the past two days, and wish to say that we shall remember with pleasure and satisfaction the gracious way in which you have listened to us.

The CHAIRMAN. Thank you, sir. The committee will now stand adjourned until 10.30 o'clock to-morrow morning, at which time those opposed to the bill will have the floor.

(The papers submitted for the record by Doctor Davidson are here printed in the record as follows:)

Doctor DAVIDSON. I should like to file at this time statements from the following officers of national organizations supporting the movement for the creation of a Federal department of education with a secretary in the President's Cabinet:

Dr. Hugh S. Magill, general secretary, International Council of Religious Education, Chicago, Ill.

Miss Belle Sherwin, president, National League of Women Voters, Washington, D. C.

Dr. Bradley Martin, president, National Kindergarten Association, New York, N. Y.

Miss Inez Bender, past national president, National Woman's Relief Corps, Decatur, Ill.

Miss Jenette Hubbard Bolles, past president, Osteopathic Women's National Association, Denver, Colo.

Mr. John Noyes, national secretary and legislative agent, National Council Junior Order of United American Mechanics of the United States of North America, Washington, D. C.

Dr. W. L. Darby, Washington secretary, Federal Council of Churches of Christ in America, Washington, D. C.

Mr. A. Catsonis, secretary, American Hellenic Education Progressive Association, Washington, D. C.

Dr. Mary Woolley, president, American Association of University Women, South Hadley, Mass.

Mrs. Ella A. Boole, president, National Woman's Christian Temperance Union, Brooklyn, N. Y.

Mrs. Harry Emerson Fosdick, chairman, Emergency Executive Committee, National Board, Young Womens Christian Association, New York City.

а

STATEMENT OF Hugh S. MAGILL, GENERAL SECRETARY, THE INTERNATIONAL

COUNCIL OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION, CHICAGO, ILL.

One of the six basic and essential principles for which our Federal Government was established, as set forth in the preamble of the Constitution, is “to promote the general welfare." In the accomplishment of this purpose the Federal Government has engaged in many undertakings conducive to the welfare of the entire Nation without encroaching upon the rights and responsibilities of the States.

The Department of Agriculture, the Department of Commerce, and the Department of Labor each with a Secretary in the President's Cabinet, has for its prime purpose the promotion of the general welfare rather than the administration of federal control over the particular interests which these departments represent.

Certainly nothing is more important to the general welfare of our country as a whole than an educated, intelligent citizenry. For this reason the Federal Government should lend its influence to the promotion of the general welfare of the Nation through the encouragement and development of the highest and best in education. To accomplish this purpose, which is undoubtedly not of secondary importance as compared with other needs, there should be a department of education under the leadership of a secretary ranking with the other secretaries of the President's Cabinet.

Education is a matter of such supreme importance that it cannot be adequately or fairly represented by a bureau in the Department of the Interior. The public welfare demands that education shall be given dignified and exalted recognition in our Federal Government comparable to that which is now accorded to material interests which, however important, can not be ranked above the education of the millions of children who will be the future citizens of our country.

a

STATEMENT OF Miss BELLE SHERWIN, PRESIDENT OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE OF

WOMEN VOTERS, WASHINGTON, D. C. The National League of Woman Voters in its convention has adopted as a part of its program of work support of the principle that there should be a department of education in the Federal Government with its head a member of the President's Cabinet. The league has taken this position believing that the creation of such a depart- ment will make it possible for very careful educational research to be carried on, the results of which would be of great value to State and local school officials all over the country.

The league believes that it would be in the interest of economy and efficiency for the educational activities in the Federal Government to be coordinated. The creation of a department of education would make that possible.

H. R. 7 embodies the principle which the league supports, and I therefore want to express our approval of the measure and our hope that it may receive a favorable report from your committee.

STATEMENT OF BRADLEY MARTIN, PRESIDENT, NATIONAL KINDERGARTEN Asso

CIATION, NEW YORK, N. Y.

It has been said of us, that we apply the rules of the sciences and arts to every problem except the all-important—the rearing of our children. It is indeed time that education had a secretary in our President's Cabinet to search out and to elucidate the best methods for the conservation of youth. When this hope is realized, the fourth and fifth years so rich in possibilities and so recklessly disregarded with respect to so large a proportion of our people will have better chance of a fair recognition. STATEMENT OF INEZ BENDER, PAST NATIONAL PRESIDENT, NATIONAL WOMAN'S

RELIEF CORPS, DECATUR, ILL. The 222,000 members of the Woman's Relief Corps are greatly interested in the

passage of the education bill.

A patriotic organization we recognize the value of a well educated and informed citizenry, for the benefit of our Nation to-day and for to-morrow.

We believe the creation of a department of education with a secretary in the Cabinet will provide the means for higher and fuller development of education. We believe the obligation of the Government toward education is as vital and as integral as it is toward any other department, and the creation of this department will provide the stimulus for our several States to do greater and better work in this line.

We trust you will add the weight of this organization and its individual members to the above end, as our national conventions have stood and will stand squarely for the measure.

STATEMENT OF JENETTE HUBBARD BOLLES, OSTEOPATHIC WOMEN'S NATIONAL

ASSOCIATION, DENVER, Colo. On behalf of the Osteopathic Women's National Association, I wish to state that we individually and collectively are strongly in favor of the education bill

. We believe the creation of a department of education with a secretary in the President's Cabinet will do much toward coordinating and standardizing and dignifying educational activities of our country; and that the moneys appropriated for this work could be much more efficiently administered than is possible under the present régime.

With best wishes for the success of this measure and with greetings to Senator Curtis from a Kansas University alumna.

STATEMENT OF DR. W. L. DARBY, WASHINGTON SECRETARY OF THE FEDERAL

COUNCIL OF CHURCHES OF CHRIST IN AMERICA

There are five cogent reasons why the present bill to create a department of education with a secretary in the President's Cabinet should be passed by both Houses of Congress at the present session:

1. The purposes to be gained by this bill are in harmony with the plans of the Federal Government from the early days of the Republic until now. There has been a steady development through many varied phases from that time to the present. No radical departure is now proposed, but instead an arrangement which will only carry still further toward its proper goal the educational ideal of all these generations past.

2. The importance of its field of operation fully supports this proposal. If we have for the promotion of our general welfare Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, and Labor, should not a similar department of education take its place beside them? No one can reasonably object to the creation or the continuance of these three activities named. The matter of education is involved however, in all of them, so that the four phases of our national life are intimately and continuously related. While we have been glad to possess a bureau and are grateful for its achievements, the field is so broad and the need so great that the only adequate answer to existing demands is to be found in the organization of a department which will take its place beside the great groups already at work in national affairs.

3. Both efficiency and economy will be effected by the passage of this bill. The former, because there will be brought together agencies, now scattered, under a common head, so that an adequate and well-rounded program will then be possible, as this has never been before. The latter, because from this center, with the wise leadership then possible advice and assistance can be given which will save many millions of dollars in the erection of buildings and the purchase of equipment. Much waste will be eliminated through the wider distribution of knowledge.

4. Our country needs an agency in education whose business it is to learn, record, correlate, and interpret information gained by a nation-wide study. This bill proposes such a fact-finding objective. It will also put at the disposal of other departments for their use such knowledge as may be gained. Its researches and investigations made possible by the appropriation will aid enormously the school systems of our cities and States throughout the entire Union.

5. This bill does not interfere with private or parochial schools; nor does it centralize education in the control of the Federal Government. Just the contrary is true, as should be the case. A study of the bill will quickly show that the organizations supporting it are not only numerous, but comprise very many of the foremost groups in our national life. A mere perusal of their names will indicate the fact that few bills have ever had such support as is given this one.

The Federal Council of the Churches of Christ in America is glad to be one of that number, and join with the others named in the request that through the proper committees, the education bill shall be pressed for passage. Your assistance in securing that most desirable end will have our deep appreciation.

STATEMENT OF MARY E. WOOLLEY, PRESIDENT OF MOUNT HOLYOKE COLLEGE

AND PRESIDENT OF THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF UNIVERSITY WOMEN, South HADLEY, Mass.

In behalf of the American Association of University Women, I wish to urge the passage of the education bill, in which the association is deeply interested.

STATEMENT OF ACHILLES CATSONIS, SUPREME SECRETARY, ORDER OF AHEPA,

WASHINGTON, D. C.

On behalf of the Order of Ahepa, I wish to submit the following statement supporting the bill for the creation of a Federal department of education.

The Order of Ahepa is a fraternal organization composed mainly of American citizens of Hellenic extraction. At present it consists of 170 chapters and approximately 17,000 members. One of the chief purposes of the organization is the promotion of education among its members. The Ahepa is in favor of creating a Federal department of education, with a secretary in the President's Cabinet, for the following reasons:

1. A Federal department of education will effectually supplement existing agencies of education.

2. It will indirectly reduce taxation by eliminating excessive expenditure now incurred by continual overlapping and duplication of effort.

3. It will be conducive to uniform education of American citizens of divergent extraction and will tend to define more clearly the meaning of Americanism.

4. It will set up definite and approved methods of instruction and eliminate trial and error methods by local boards and educators.

5. It will apprise the Nation of outstanding national problems which can not be detected by State or local authorities, and it will interest more citizens in their solution.

6. By widening the scope of the individual's penetration into governmental affairs it will produce greater interest in government and consequently more alert and useful citizens.

7. It will furnish the Federal Government with the means of obtaining enlightened information on international problems with which the States by the very nature of their limited sovereignty are not concerned and will thus enablo us to cooperate more intelligently with other nations in the solution of the world problems.

ELLA A. BOOLE, PRESIDENT, NATIONAL Woman's CHRISTIAN TEMPERANCE

UNION, BROOKLYN, N. Y. The National Woman's Christian Temperance Union desires to record its approval of H. R. 7, introduced by the on. Daniel A. Reed.

Education for the youth of America is a vital function of our Government and has been so recognized ever since it was established. As schools have increased and the scope of education broadened the responsibility for investigation and coordination of methods has increased. Furthermore, there has been such advance in methods that a clearing house for such methods, with investigation as to their value, is essential.

We favor H. R. 7 for the following reasons: 1. The creation of a department of education with representation in the Cabinet will give to education its rightful place alongside of the other great functions of the Government such as commerce and labor.

2. This new and revised bill will not entail large expense. It will, however, furnish the medium for investigation and correlation of methods.

3. The presence of the head of this department in the Cabinet will give to education the benefit of methods employed in furthering other interests of the Government.

4. It will not interfere with State functions but will be a help to the States because the results of its investigations will be available for all.

For these and many other reasons we approve the bill.

STATEMENT OF MRS. HARRY EMERSON FOSDICK, CHAIRMAN EMERGENCY EXECU

TIVE COMMITTEE NATIONAL BOARD, YOUNG WOMENS CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS, NEW YORK

The national board of the Young Womens Christian Associations of the United States of America has a very vital interest in education. A large part of its work is in the field of education. Therefore, it is natural that the proposal for a Federal department of education should be of great interest to the organization. It was on December 1, 1920, that the proposal (then embodied in the Smith-Towner bill) was first brought to our attention, but it was not until three years later, on October 3, 1923, that it was indorsed, in the form of the SterlingTowner measure, by the national board. Three years of study by education committees, summer conferences, and discussions throughout the membership had removed all doubts as to the value and necessity of a Federal department of education. During these three years the membership had been thoroughly informed as to the features of the bill and had become convinced that the objections frequently urged against the bill were not valid. From their study, they saw that the control of education would still remain with the several States, that private and sectarian schools would not be interfered with, and that no artificial standardization of education could possibly result from the passage of this

In April, 1924, the action of the national board was ratified by the biennial convention of the Young Womens Christian Associations, a body of about 2,000 duly accredited delegates meeting in New York City. The 1926 convention in Milwaukee again indorsed the measure and the 1928 convention at Sacramento has just indorsed it.

So, after a period of three years' study, the association has steadily supported the effort to establish a Federal department of education from October, 1923, on.

measure.

STATEMENT OF John H. NoYES, SECRETARY AND LEGISLATIVE AGENT OF THE

NATIONAL EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, NATIONAL COUNCIL OF THE JUNIOR ORDER OF UNITED AMERICAN MECHANICS, UNITED STATES OF NORTH AMERICA

I am secretary and legislative agent of the national excutive committee, National Council of the Junior Order of United American Mechanics in the United States of North America. Our order is fraternal in character, organized over 50 years ago, and has upwards of 400,000 members. Although our order is fraternal, with insurance features, it is devoted to certain civic matters, both State and national. These activities are directed particularly to the problems of public schools and immigration. We support all national measures looking to the advancement of the public schools so long as they in no wise infringe on the rights of the States.

The Curtis-Reed bill, which creates a department of education, with a secretary in the President's Cabinet, has been carefully analized by our national council and our national legislative committee to determine, first, its constitutionality; second, its values to education; third, the scope or authority over other educational activities of the National Government imposed by the department; fourth, the plan for obtaining the valuable counsel and advice of the various State public school systems through the State superintendents or commissioners.

On all of these four points we are in full accord with the framers of the bill, except in one respect. We would increase the research and investigation provisions of the bill by naming them as is done with the 10 subjects in the proposed program rather than leave them to the judgment of the secretary. Or, in lieu of naming additional objects of research, we would favor a specified contingent appropriation for the purpose. What we want, as we see it, is research and yet more research on the broadest practical program consistent with the immediate and continual needs of education.

The important point which some of the friends of our public-school systems overlook when considering the bill is: Facts classified and grouped with relation to each other constitute our various sciences, the road over which civilization has made its most rapid strides. Strange as it may seem, education, tardy in its own introspection, with respect to its own processes, finds itself to be a multitude of interrelated sciences from the kindergarten through the various specializations in the primary, intermediate, and secondary schools; in fact, on through the modes of teaching the applied sciences themselves, including literature, art, business, mechanics, commerce, agriculture, etc. So intimately related is education to the

« AnteriorContinuar »