Jewish Identity in Early Rabbinic Writings

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BRILL, 1994 - 269 páginas
"Jewish Identity in Early Rabbinic Writings" is more than a question of legal status: it is the "experience of being Jewish" or of 'Jewishness' in all its social and cultural dimensions. This work describes this experience as it emerges in Talmudic and Midrashic sources. Besides the question of "who is a Jew?," topics include the contrast between Israel and the non-Jews, the physical embodiment of Jewish identity, the 'boundaries' of Israel and resistance to assimilation. Jewish identity, it is argued, hinges essentially on the Divine commandments ("mitzvot") and on Israel's perceived proximity with the Divine. Drawing on a variety of disciplines, including the theories of William James and Merleau-Ponty, this study raises important issues in anthropology, as well as accounting for central aspects of early rabbinic Judaism.
 

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Contenido

assumptions images
1
Israel in symbolic imagery
82
dissociation
139
200
230
solipsism introversion
247
Index
267
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Acerca del autor (1994)

Sacha Stern, Ph.D. (1992) in Jewish Studies, University of Oxford, is currently Sidney Corob Lecturer in Jewish Studies at Jew's College, London.

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