Children Learn by Observing and Contributing to Family and Community Endeavors: A Cultural Paradigm

Portada
Academic Press, 2015 M12 8 - 450 páginas
0 Opiniones
Las opiniones no están verificadas, pero Google revisa que no haya contenido falso y lo quita si lo identifica

Children Learn by Observing and Contributing to Family and Community Endeavors, the latest in the Advances in Child Development and Behavior Series provides a major step forward in highlighting patterns and variability in the normative development of the everyday lives of children, expanding beyond the usual research populations that have extensive Western schooling in common.

The book documents the organization of children’s learning and social lives, especially among children whose families have historical roots in the Americas (North, Central, and South), where children traditionally are included and contribute to the activities of their families and communities, and where Western schooling is a recent foreign influence. The findings and theoretical arguments highlight a coherent picture of the importance of the development of children’s participation in ongoing activity as presented by authors with extensive experience living and working in such communities.

  • Contains contributions from leading authorities in the field of child development and behavior
  • Presents a coherent picture of the importance of the development of children’s participation in ongoing activity
  • Provides a major step forward in highlighting patterns and variability in the normative development of the everyday lives of children, expanding beyond the usual research populations that have extensive Western schooling in common
  • Informs and updates on all the latest developments in the field
 

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

No encontramos ningún comentario en los lugares habituales.

Contenido

A Cultural ParadigmLearning by Observing and Pitching In
1
Children Observing And Pitching In
23
Learning by Observing and Pitching in LOPI Fits with Cultural Cosmovisions
251
Author Index
401
Contents of Previous Volumes
419
Back Cover
436
Derechos de autor

Otras ediciones - Ver todas

Términos y frases comunes

Acerca del autor (2015)

Maricela Correa-Chávez is an assistant professor of developmental psychology at Long Beach State University in California. Her work centers on understanding children’s learning as a cultural practice that develops through participation in activity with others in communities that have Indigenous Mexican and Central American roots, focusing particularly on how children use forms of attention and communication in learning that are different from the forms of attention and communication expected by the institution of school. She has conducted research on these topics in Mexico and Guatemala, as well as in the United States with both immigrant and middle-class families. Dr. Correa-Chávez received her doctoral degree in Developmental Psychology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, and her work has been funded by the Ford Foundation, the Spencer Foundation, the American Educational Research Association/Institute for Educational Sciences, the UC Linguistic Minority Research Institute, and the Foundation for Child Development.

Rebeca Mejia-Arauz is faculty professor and researcher in the Department of Health, Psychology, and Community at ITESO University, Guadalajara, Mexico. She obtained the doctoral degree in Developmental Psychology at the University of California, Santa Cruz, the M. Sc. in Social Psychology at the London School of Economics, and a specialty in Cognitive Development at ITESO University, in México. Her line of research focuses on sociocultural and cognitive development, specifically on processes of social interaction, participation, and communication for learning. Her current research projects study cultural contrasts in interaction, attention, communication and collaboration among Indigenous and urban children; children ́s out-of-school practices in urban and Indigenous contexts; cultural and intergenerational family transformations affecting children ́s participation in cultural activities and their education and development; and children ́s literacy development in urban Mexico. She is representative of Latin America and The Caribbean at the International Society for Cultural and Activity Research; she is a member of the National System of Researchers (SNI) in México. In 2014 she received the award for Research Trajectory and Contributions to Knowledge in Psychology from the Society of Intervention Psychologists of the State of Jalisco.

Barbara Rogoff is UC Santa Cruz Foundation Distinguished Professor of Psychology. She received the 2013 Award for Distinguished Lifetime Contributions to Cultural and Contextual Factors in Child Development, from the Society for Research in Child Development. She is a Fellow of the National Academy of Education, Association for Psychological Sciences, American Anthropological Association, American Psychological Association, and American Educational Research Asociation. She has been Fellow of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, Kellogg Fellow, Spencer Fellow, and Osher Fellow of the Exploratorium. She has served as Editor of Human Development and committee member for the U.S. National Academy of Science.

Información bibliográfica