Gothick Origins and Innovations

Portada
Allan Lloyd Smith, Victor Sage
Rodopi, 1994 - 234 páginas
Gothic: Origins and Innovations brings together nineteen papers from an international group of scholars currently researching in the field of the Gothic which take a fresh, contemporary look at the tradition from its eighteenth-century inception to the twentieth century. Topics and authors include the current usage and definition of the term 'Gothic'; the eighteenth-century rise of the genre; the Sublime; Victorian sensation fiction, and authors such as Coleridge, Mary Shelly, Maturin, LeFanu, Washington Irving, Robert Louis Stevenson, Bram Stoker, John Neale, Jack London, Herman Melville, Dickens, Henry James and the movie version of his Turn of the Screw, The Innocents. This wide-ranging set of discussions brings to the subject a new set of perspectives, revising standard accounts of the origins of the genre and extending the historical and cultural contexts into which traditional literary history has tended to confine the subject. Framed by a lively and challenging introduction, the collection brings to bear a full range of contemporary critical instruments, approaches, and interdisciplinary languages, ranging from the new vocabularies of the socio-cultural to the latest debates in the psychoanalytic field. It provides a stimulating introduction to recent thinking about the Gothic.

Dentro del libro

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

No encontramos ningún comentario en los lugares habituales.

Páginas seleccionadas

Contenido

Tom Jones Jacobitism and the Rise of Gothic
16
Jerrold E Hogle
31
Maturin and the Calvinist Sublime Richard Haslam
44
Frankenstein and the 1832 Anatomy Act Tim Marshall
57
Rip Van Winkle and the Phantom Allan Lloyd Smith
65
79
95
Gothic Possibilities in MobyDick
115
Jack Londons The SeaWolf as Gothic Romance
123
Derechos de autor

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 44 - For I know that my redeemer liveth, And that he shall stand at the latter day upon the earth : And though after my skin worms destroy this body, Yet in my flesh shall I see God: Whom I shall see for myself, And mine eyes shall behold, and not another; Though my reins be consumed within me.
Página 221 - Beneath the lamp the lady bowed, And slowly rolled her eyes around; Then drawing in her breath aloud, Like one that shuddered, she unbound The cincture from beneath her breast: Her silken robe, and inner vest, Dropt to her feet, and full in view, Behold! her bosom and half her side— A sight to dream of, not to tell!
Página 91 - His children, too, were as ragged and wild as if they belonged to nobody. His son Rip, an urchin begotten in his own likeness, promised to inherit the habits with the old clothes of his father. He was generally seen trooping like a colt at his mother's heels, equipped in a pair of his father's cast-off...
Página 44 - Nay but, O man, who art thou that repliest against God? Shall the thing formed say to him that formed it, Why hast thou made me thus? Hath not the potter power over the clay, of the same lump to make one vessel unto honour, and another unto dishonour?
Página 27 - Angels and ministers of grace defend us! Be thou a spirit of health or goblin damn'd, Bring with thee airs from heaven or blasts from hell, Be thy intents wicked or charitable, Thou com'st in such a questionable shape, That I will speak to thee: I'll call thee Hamlet, King, father, royal Dane, O, answer me!
Página 92 - ... else; the rain always made a point of setting in just as he had some out-door work to do; so that though his patrimonial estate had dwindled away under his management, acre by acre, until there was little more left than a mere patch of Indian corn and potatoes, yet it was the worst conditioned farm in the neighborhood.
Página 46 - But whilst we contemplate so vast an object, under the arm, as it were, of almighty power, and invested upon every side with omnipresence, we shrink into the minuteness of our own nature, and are, in a manner, annihilated before him.
Página 60 - I thought I saw Elizabeth, in the bloom of health, walking in the streets of Ingolstadt. Delighted and surprised, I embraced her, but as I imprinted the first kiss on her lips, they became livid with the hue of death; her features appeared to change, and I thought that I held the corpse of my dead mother in my arms; a shroud enveloped her form, and I saw the grave-worms crawling in the folds of the flannel.
Página 40 - In the former, all was imagination and improbability: in the latter, nature is always intended to be, and sometimes has been, copied with success. Invention has not been wanting; but the great resources of fancy have been dammed up, by a strict adherence to common life. But if in the latter species Nature has cramped imagination, she did but take her revenge, having been totally excluded from old romances. The actions, sentiments, and conversations, of the heroes and heroines of ancient days were...
Página 90 - Dutch inhabitants, however, almost universally gave it full credit. Even to this day they never hear a thunder-storm of a summer afternoon about the Kaatskill, but they say Hendrick Hudson and his crew are at their game of ninepins ; and it is a common wish of all henpecked husbands in the neighbourhood, when life hangs heavy on their hands, that they might have a quieting draught out of Rip Van Winkle's flagon.

Información bibliográfica