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of this Nature in several Languages plentifully furnish’d.

Now, tho' I have differ'd from them in Method, yet I am of Opinion this Collection may serve to the same End, with equal Profit and greater Pleasure to the Reader. For, what are Epithets, but Adjectives that denote and express the Qualities of the Substantives to which they are join’d? as Purple, Rofie, Smiling, Dewy, Morning : Dim, Gloomy, Silent, Night. What Synonymes, but Words of a like Signification? as Fear, Dread, Terrour, Confternation, Affright, Dismay, &c. Are they not then naturally to be sought for in the Descriptions of Persons and Things? And can we not better judge by a piece of Painting, how Beautifully Colours may be dispos'd ; than by seeing the same several Colours scatter'd without Design on a Table ? When you are at a Lofs therefore for pros per Epithets or Synonymes, look into this Alphabetical Collection for any Word under which the Subject of your Thought may most probably be rang d'; and you will find what have been imploy'd by our best Writers, and in what Manner. It

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It would have been as easie a Task for mé as it has been to others before mę, to have threaded tedious Bead-rolls of Synonymes and Epithets together, and put them by themselves: But when they stand alone, they appear bald, infipid, uncouth, and offensive both to the Eye and Ear. In that Disposition they may indeed help the Memory, but cannot direct the Judgment in the Choice.

But besides, to confess a Secret, I am very unwilling it should be laid to my Charge, that I have furnish'd Tools, and given a Temptation of Verfifying, to such as in spight of Art and Nature undertake to be Poets; and who mistake their Fondnefs to Rhyme, or Necessity of Writing, for a true Genius of Poetry, and lawful Call from Apollo. Such Debasers of Rhyme and Dablers in Poetry would do well to consider, that a Man would justly deserve a higher Esteem in the World by being a good Mason or Shoo-maker, or hy excelling in any other Art that his Talent inclines him to, and that is useful to Man kind, than by being an indifferent or fe

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of this Nature in several Languages plentifully furnish’d.

Now, tho' I have differ'd from them in Method, yet I am of Opinion this Collection may serve to the same End, with equal Profit and greater Pleasure to the Reader. For, what are Epithets, but Adjectives that denote and express the Qualities of the Substantives to which they are join'd ? as Purple, Rosie, Smiling, Dewy, Morning : Dim, Gloomy, Silent, Night. What Synonymes, but Words of a like Signification? as Fear, Dread, Terrour, Confternation, Affright, Dismay, &c. Are they not then naturally to be sought for in the Descriptions of Persons and Things? And can we not better judge by a piece of Painting, how Beautifully Colours may be dispos’d ; than by seeing the same several Colours scatter'd without Design on a Table ? When you are at a Loss therefore for

pros per Epithets or Synonymes, look into this Alphabetical Collection for any Word under which the Subject of your Thought may most probably be rang’d; and you will find what have been imploy’d'by our best Writers, and in what Manner.". It

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It would have been as easie a Task for mé as it has been to others before mę, to have threaded tedious Bead-rolls of Synonymes and Epithets together, and put them by themselves: But when they stand alone, they appear bald, infipid, uncouth, and offensive both to the Eye and Ear. In that Disposition they may indeed help the Memory, but cannot direct the Judgment in the Choice.

But besides, to confess a Secret, I am very unwilling it should be laid to my Charge, that I have furnish'd Tools, and given a Temptation of Versifying, to such as in spight of Art and Nature undertake to be Poets; and who mistake their Fondnefs to Rhyme, or Neceffity of Writing, for a true Genius of Poetry, and lawful Call from Apollo. Such Debasers of Rhyme and Dablers in Poetry would do well to consider, that a Man would justly deserve á higher Esteem in the World by being a good Mason or Shoo-maker, or hy excelling in any other Art that his Talent inclines him to, and that is useful to Mankind, than by being an indifferent or se.

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of the Greek and Roman Poets have not a little contributed to this Collection, Homer, Anacreon, Lucretius, Catullus, Virgil, Horace, Ovid, Juvenal; &c. are cited with their Translators: And after each Author's Name are quoted their Plays and other Poems, from whence the Passages are extracted.

The Reader will likewise observe, that I have sometimes ascrib'd to several Au. thors the Quotations taken from one and the same Play. Thus to those from the first and third Act of Oedipus, I have put Dryden ; to those from the three other, Lee: Because the first and third Act of that Play were written by Dryden, the three other by Lee. To those from Troilus and Cressida I have somtimes put ShakeSpear, sometimes Dryden ; because he having alter'd that Play, whatever I found not in the Edition of Shakespear, ought to be ascrib'd to him. And in like man ner of several other Plays.

As no Thought can be justly said to be fine, unless it be true, I have all along had a great regard for Truth except on

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