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freedom of transit to persons, goods, vessels, carriages, waggons and mails in transit to or from any Allied or Associated State over Czecho-Slovak territory, and to treat them at least as favourably as the persons, goods, vessels, carriages, waggons and mails respectively of Czecho-Slovak or of any other more favored nationality, origin, importation or ownership as regards facilities, charges, restrictions, and all other matters.

All charges imposed in Czecho-Slovakia on such traffic in transit shall be reasonable having regard to the conditions of the traffic. Goods in transit shall be exempt from all customs or other duties.

Tariffs for transit traffic across Czecho-Slovakia and tariffs between Czecho-Slovakia and any other Allied or Associated Power involving through tickets or waybills shall be established at the request of that Allied or Associated Power.

Freedom of transit will extend to postal, telegraphic and telephonic services.

Provided that no Allied or Associated Power can claim the benefit of these provisions on behalf of any other part of its territory in which reciprocal treatment is not accorded in respect of the same subject-matter.

If within a period of five years from the coming into force of the present Treaty no general convention as aforesaid shall have been concluded under the auspices of the League of Nations, CzechoSlovakia shall be at liberty at any time thereafter to give twelve months' notice to the Secretary-General of the League of Nations to terminate the obligations of the present Article.

ARTICLE 20.

Czecho-Slovakia undertakes to adhere within twelve months of the coming into force of the present Treaty, to the International Conventions specified in Annex I.

Czecho-Slovakia undertakes to adhere to any new Convention, concluded with the approval of the Council of the League of Nations within five years of the coming into force of the present Treaty, to replace any of the international instruments specified in Annex 1.

The Czecho-Slovak Government undertakes within twelve months to notify the Secretary-General of the League of Nations whether or not Czecho-Slovakia desires to adhere to either or both of the International Conventions specified in Annex II.

Until Czecho-Slovakia has adhered to the two Conventions last specified in Annex I, she agrees, on condition of reciprocity, to protect by effective measures the industrial, literary and artistic property of nationals of the Allied and Associated States. In the case of any Allied or Associated State not adhering to the said Conventions Czecho-Slovakia agrees to continue to afford such effective protection on the same conditions until the conclusion of a special bilateral treaty or agreement for that purpose with such Allied or Associated State.

Pending her adhesion to the other Conventions specified in Annex I, Czecho-Slovakia will secure to the nationals of the Allied and Assnciated Powers the advantages to which they would be entitled under the said Conventions.

Czecho-Slovakia further agrees, on condition of reciprocity, to recognize and protect all rights in any industrial, literary or artistic property belonging to the nationals of the Allied and Associated States in force, or which but for the war would have been in force, in any part of her territory. For such purpose she will accord the extensions of time agreed to in Articles 259 and 260 1 of the Treaty of Peace with Austria.

ANNEX I.

l'ostal Conventions.

Conventions and agreements of the Universal Postal Union signed at Vienna, July 4, 1891.

Conventions and agreements of the Postal Union signed at Washington, June 15, 1897.

Conventions and agreements of the Postal Union signed at Rome, May 26, 1906.

Telegraphic and Radio-Telegraphic Conventions. International Telegraphic Convention signed at St. Petersburg, July 10/22, 1875.

Regulations and Tariffs drawn up by the International Telegraph Conference of Lisbon, June 11, 1908. International Radio-Telegraphic Convention, July 5, 1912.

Railway Conventions. Convention and arrangements signed at Berne on October 14, 1890, September 20, 1893, July 16, 1895, June 16, 1898, and September 19, 1906, and the current supplementary provisions made under those Conventions.

Agreement of May 15, 1886, regarding the sealing of railway trucks subject to customs inspection, and Protocol of May 15, 1907.

Agreement of May 15, 1886, regarding the technical standardisation of railways, as modified on May 18, 1907.

Sanitary Conventions. Conventions of Paris and Vienna of April 3, 1894, March 19, 1897, and December 3, 1903.

Other Conventions. Convention of September 26, 1906, for the suppression of night work for women.

Convention of September 26, 1906, for the suppression of the use of white phosphorus in the manufacture of matches.

Conventions of May 18, 1904, and May 4, 1910, regarding the suppression of the White Slave Traffic.

Convention of May 4, 1910, regarding the suppression of obscene publications.

International Convention of Paris of March 20, 1883, as revised at Washington in 1911, for the protection of industrial property.

International Convention of Berne of September 9, 1886, revised at Berlin on November 13, 1908, and completed by the Additional Protocol signed at Berne on March 20, 1914, for the protection of literary and artistic works.

ANNEX II. Agreement of Madrid of April 14, 1891, for the prevention of false indications of origin on goods, revised at Washington in 1911.

Agreement of Madrid of April 14, 1891, for the international registration of trade-marks, revised at Washington in 1911.

ARTICLE 21.

All rights and privileges accorded by the foregoing Articles to the Allied and Associated States shall be accorded equally to all States Members of the League of Nations.

See pp. 3257 and 3258.

The PRESENT TREATY, in French, in English and in Italian, of which the French text shall prevail in case of divergence, shall be ratified. It shall come into force at the same time as the Treaty of Peace with Austria.

The deposit of ratifications shall be made at Paris.

Powers of which the seat of the Government is outside Europe will be entitled merely to inform the Government of the French Republic through their diplomatic representative at Paris that their ratification has been given; in that case they must transmit the instrument of ratification as soon as possible.

A procès-verbal of the deposit of ratifications will be drawn up.

The French Government will transmit to all the Signatory Powers a certified copy of the procès-verbal of the deposit of ratifications.

In faith whereof the above-named Plenipotentiaries have signed the present Treaty.

Done at Saint-Germain-en-Laye, the tenth day of September, one thousand nine hundred and nineteen, in a single copy which will remain deposited in the archives of the French Republic, and of which authenticated copies will be transmitted to each of the Signatory Powers.

(L.S.) FRANK L. POLK.
(L.S.) HENRY WHITE.
(L.S.) TASKER H. BLISS.
(L.S.) ARTUUR JAMES Balfour,
(L.S.) MILNER.
(L.S.) GEO. N. BARNES.
(L.S.) A. E. KEMP.
(L.S.) G. F. PEARCE.
(L.S.) MILNER.
(L.S.) Thos. MACKENZIE.
(L.S.) SINHA OF RAIPUR.
(L.S.) G. CLEMENCEAU.
(L.S.) S. Pichon.,
(L.S.) L.-L. KLOTZ,
(L.S.) ANDRÉ TARDIEU.
(L.S.) JULES CAMBON.
(L.S.) Tom. TITTONI.
(L.S.) VITTORIO SCIALOJA.
(L.S.) MAGGIORINO FERRARIS.
(L.S.) GUGLIELMO MARCONI.
(L.S.) S. CHINDA.
(L.S.) K. MATSUI.
(L.S.) H. IJUIN.
(L.S.) D. KAREL KRAMA Ř.
(L.S.) DR. EDUARD BENEŠ.

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FRANCE.

1919,

ASSISTANCE TO FRANCE IN THE EVENT OF UNPROVOKED AGGRESSION BY

GERMANY–AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES
FRANCE.

AND

Signed at Versailles June 28, 1919.

(66th Cong., 1st sess., S. Doc. No. 63, pp, 5, 7, 9.)

ARTICLES.

I. Obligates United States to assist

France against unprovoked
German aggression in case ar-
ticles 42, 43, 44 of treaty of
Versailles do not provide
France adequate security.

II. In force when similar Franco

British treaty is ratified.
III. Must be recognized as consistent

with League of Nations cove

nant; duration, IV. Ratification,

ASSISTANCE TO FRANCE IN THE EVENT OF UNPRO

VOKED AGGRESSION BY GERMANY.

AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND FRANCE, SIGNED AT

VERSAILLES JUNE 28, 1919. Whereas the United States of America and the French Republic are equally animated by the desire to maintain the Peace of the World so happily restored by the Treaty of Peace signed at Versailles the 28th day of June, 1919, putting an end to the war begun by the aggression of the German Empire and ended by the defeat of that Power; and,

Whereas the United States of America and the French Republic are fully persuaded that an unprovoked movement of aggression by Germany against France would not only violate both the letter and the spirit of the Treaty of Versailles to which the United States of America and the French Republic are parties, thus exposing France anew to the intolerable burdens of an unprovoked war, but that such aggression on the part of Germany would be and is so regarded by the Treaty of Versailles as a hostile act against all the Powers signatory to that Treaty and as calculated to disturb the Peace of the world by involving inevitably and directly the States of Europe and indirectly, as experience has amply and unfortunately demonstrated, the world at large; and,

Whereas the United States of America and the French Republic fear that the stipulations relating to the left bank of the Rhine contained in said Treaty of Versailles may not at first provide adequate security and protection to France on the one hand and the United States of America as one of the signatories of the Treaty of Versailles on the other;

Therefore, the United States of America and the French Republic having decided to conclude a treaty to effect these necessary purposes, Woodrow Wilson, President of the United States of America, and Robert Lansing, Secretary of State of the United States, specially authorized thereto by the President of the United States, and Georges Clemenceau, President of the Council, Minister of War, and Stéphen Pichon, Minister of Foreign Affairs, specially authorized thereto by Raymond Poincaré, President of the French Republic, have agreed upon the following articles:

ARTICLE I. In case the following stipulations relating to the Left Bank of the Rhine contained in the Treaty of Peace with Germany signed at Versailles the 28th day of June, 1919, by the United States of America, the French Republic and the British Empire among other Powers:

"ARTICLE 42. Germany is forbidden to maintain or construct

any fortifications either on the left bank of the Rhine or on the right bank to the west of a line drawn 50 kilometres to the

East of the Rhine. ‘ARTICLE 43. In the area defined above the maintenance and

assembly of armed forces, either permanently or temporarily, and military maneuvres of any kind, as well as the upkeep of all permanent works for mobilization are in the same way for

bidden. “ARTICLE 44. In case Germany violates in any manner whatever

the provisions of Articles 42 and 43, she shall be regarded as committing a hostile act against the Powers signatory of the present Treaty and as calculated to disturb the peace of the

world.", may not at first provide adequate security and protection to France, the United States of America shall be bound to come immediately to her assistance in the event of any unprovoked movement of aggression against her being made by Germany:

: ARTICLE II. The present Treaty, in similar terms with the Treaty of even date for the same purpose concluded between Great Britain and the French Republic, a copy of which Treaty is annexed hereto, will only come into force when the latter is ratified.

1

ARTICLE III.

The present Treaty must be submitted to the Council of the League of Nations, and must be recognized by the Council, acting if need be by a majority, as an engagement which is consistent with the Covenant of the League. It will continue in force until on the application of one of the Parties to it the Council, acting if need be by a majority, agrees that the League itself affords sufficient protection.'

ARTICLE IV.
The present Treaty will be submitted to the Senate of the United
States at the same time as the Treaty of Versailles is submitted

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