Lift Every Voice: African American Oratory, 1787-1900

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Philip Sheldon Foner, Robert J. Branham
University of Alabama Press, 1998 - 925 páginas

This comprehensive anthology will be the standard source for the
study of African American public address for years to come.

For Americans of the 19th century, as W. E. B. Du Bois observed, eloquent
speeches were 'the shining lights of civilization' that both expressed
and sought to improve the lives and communities from which they sprang.
Through political speeches, sermons, lectures, oral testimonies, and ceremonial
addresses, African Americans offered diverse responses to the issues and
events of their times, including not only slavery and racial equality but
also women's rights, education, religion, immigration, socialism, war,
Indian policy, and labor organization, among others. The speeches in this
collection are among the most powerful expressions of African American
opinions on these issues and were delivered on occasions and before audiences
where the speakers believed their words might be transformative.

"Lift Every Voice" is a completely revised, updated, and expanded
version of Philip Foner's 1972 classic Voice of Black America, which Library
Journal hailed as "indispensable.""This well-edited and
richly inclusive work," wrote Benjamin Quarles, "unveils the
full sweep of Black expression as found in platform addresses" by
"men and women who join eloquence with reason in articulating their
grievances and their aspirations and in arousing their listeners with their
ringing and prophetic challenges." This new collection includes over
60 additional texts and revised and expanded introductory essays that provide
historical, biographical, and critical information for each speech.

Containing more than 150 speeches, this anthology represents the most
extensive and diverse collection of African American oratory of the 18th
and 19th centuries ever published. "Lift Every Voice" makes readily
accessible not only the classic orations of such well-known figures
as Frederick Douglass, Sojourner Truth, and Booker T. Washington but also
dozens of lesser-known but important speeches deserving greater recognition
and study. Many of these speeches are previously unpublished, uncollected,
or long out of print.

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Introduction
1
You Stand on the Level with the Greatest Kings on Earth
27
A Charge Delivered to the Brethren of the African Lodge
38
Pray God Give Us the Strength to Bear Up Under
45
Address to the People of Color
52
Universal Salvation
59
Abolition of the Slave Trade
66
A Thanksgiving Sermon
73
Oration in Memory of Abraham Lincoln by Frederick Douglass April 14 1876
567
The Siouxs Revenge by B T Tanner July 13 1876
577
How Long? How Long O Heaven? by Reverend Henry McNeal Turner August 5 1876
579
The Remedy for the Evils of Society by Peter H Clark July 2 1877
580
Reasons Why the Colored American Should Go to Africa by John E Bruce October 1877
586
The Destined Superiority of the Negro by Alexander Crummell November 1877
589
Migration Is the Only Remedy for Our Wrongs by Robert J Harlan May 8 1879
599
Race Unity by Ferdinand L Barnett May 9 1879
603

Mutual Interest Mutual Benefit and Mutual Relief
80
A Sermon Preached on the Funeral Occasion of Mary Henery
86
Valedictory Address
98
Termination of Slavery
104
The Necessity of a General Union Among
110
The Cause of the Slave Became My
121
Let Us Alone
130
Eulogy on William Wilberforce
143
Put On the Armour of Righteousness
158
On the Improvement of the Mind
166
Slavery Brutalizes
173
Slavery Presses Down upon the Free People of Color
179
The Rights of Colored Citizens in Traveling
189
25
190
An Address to the Slaves of the United States of America
198
For the Dissolution of the Union
205
by William Wells Brown September 27 1849
213
A Plea for the Oppressed
220
Arnt I a Woman?
227
Snakes and Geese
269
The Triumph of Equal School Rights in Boston
279
The Negro Race SelfGovernment and the Haitian Revolution
288
Liberty for Slaves
305
Break Every Yoke and Let the Oppressed Go Free
318
Why Slavery Is Still Rampant
328
by H Ford Douglas July 4 1860
340
A Plea for Free Speech
354
We Ask for Our Rights
368
Lincolns Colonization Proposal Is AntiChristian
375
Freedoms Joyful
381
The Moral and Social Aspect of Africa
389
The Position and Duties of the Colored People
397
A Tribute to a Fallen Black Soldier
407
Give Us Equal Pay and We Will Go to War
426
Let the Monster Perish
432
Colored Men Standing in the Way of Their Own Race
443
An Appeal for Aid to the Freedmen
452
These Are Revolutionary Times
460
To My White Fellow Citizens
467
Justice Should Recognize No Color
473
Finish the Good Work of Uniting Colored
483
Then I Began to Live
503
Abolish Separate Schools by Hiram R Revels February 8 1871
506
The Ku Klux of the North by Isaiah C Wears November 1871
512
The Right of Women to Vote by Mary Ann Shadd Cary c January 1872
514
A Plea in Behalf of the Cuban Revolution by Henry Highland Garnet December 13 1872
517
The Civil Rights Bill by Robert Browne Elliott January 6 1874
520
Equality before the Law by John Mercer Langston May 17 1874
536
The Civil Rights Bill by James T Rapier February 4 1875
549
The Great Problem to Be Solved by Frances Ellen Watkins Harper April 14 1875
564
Redeem the Indian by Blanche K Bruce April 17 1880
607
These Evils Call Loudly for Redress by John P Green May 1884
613
Negro EducationIts Helps and Hindrances
623
680
627
The Stone Cut Out of the Mountain by John Jasper July 20 1884
634
Reasons for a New Political Party by Reverend Henry McNeal Turner February 12 1886
640
The Present Relations of Labor and Capital by T Thomas Fortune April 20 1886
642
How Shall We Make the Women of Our Race Stronger? by Olivia A Davidson April 21 1886
645
Introduction of Master Workman Powderly by Frank J Ferrell October 3 1886
652
Am an Anarchist by Lucy E Parsons December 20 1886
655
Mob Violence by Samuel Allen McElwee February 23 1887
660
Womans Place in the work of the Denomination by Mary V Cook August 26 1887
663
How Shall We Get Our Rights? by Reverend M Edward Bryant December 4 1887
676
Importance of Race Pride by Edward Everett Brown March 5 1888
680
Woman Suffrage by Frederick Douglass April 1888
687
Denounce the SoCalled Emancipation as a Stupendous Fraud by Frederick Douglass April 16 1888
693
Organized Resistance Is Our Best Remedy by John E Bruce October 5 1889
707
National Perils by William Bishop Johnson October 20 1889
708
It Is Time to Call a Halt by T Thomas Fortune January 1890
713
Harvard Class Day Oration by Clement Garnett Morgan June 1890
728
Education and the Problem by Joseph C Price July 1890
734
Lynch Law in All Its Phases by Ida B Wells February 13 1893
745
The Intellectual Progress of the Colored Women of the United States Since the Emancipation Proclamation
761
Womens Cause Is One and Universal
772
The Ethics of the Hawaiian Question
790
Address to the First National Conference of Colored Women
797
A Plea against the Disfranchisement of the Negro
805
The African in Africa and the African in America
815
We Are Struggling for Equality
832
In Union There Is Strength
840
The Attitude of the American Mind toward
846
The Functions of the Negro Scholar
857
We Must Have a Cleaner Social Morality
863
The Negro Will Never Acquiesce as Long as He Lives
872
The Fallacy of Industrial Education as
878
The Burden of the Educated Colored Woman
885
To the Nations of the World
905
229
909
728
910
359
911
761
912
158
913
586
914
273
915
599
916
384
917
607
918
623
919
168
920
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