Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

They still are employed for to dress us, in brief,
Plum-pudding, goose, capon, minced pies, and roast beef.

Although the cold weather doth hunger provoke,
'Tis a comfort to see how the chimneys do smoke;
Provision is making for beer, ale, and wine,
For all that are willing or ready to dine ;
Then haste to the kitchen, for diet the chief-
Plum-pudding, goose, capon, minced pies, and roast beef.

All travellers, as they do pass on their way,
At gentlemen's halls are invited to stay,
Themselves to refresh, and their horses to rest,
Since that he must be Old Christmas's guest;
Nay, the poor shall not want, but have, for relief,
Plum-pudding, goose, capon, minced pies, and roast beef.

Now Mock-beggar Hall it no more shall stand empty,
But all shall be furnished with freedom and plenty;
The hoarding old misers, who used to preserve
The gold in their coffers, and see the poor starve,
Must now spread their tables, and give them, in brief,
Plum-pudding, goose, capon, minced pies, and roast beef.

The court, and the city, and country are glad
Old Christmas is come to cheer up the sad ;
Broad pieces and guineas about now shall fly,
And hundreds be losers by cogging a die,
Whilst others are feasting with diet the chief-
Plum-pudding, goose, capon, minced pies, and roast beef.

Those that have no coin at the cards for to play,
May sit by the fire and pass time away,

--

OLD CHRISTMAS RETURNED.

And drink of their moisture contented and free-
“My honest good fellow, come, here is to thee !"
And when they are hungry, full to their relief,
Plum-pudding, goose, capon, minced pies, and roast beef.

Young gallants and ladies shall foot it along,
Each room in the house to the music shall throng,
Whilst jolly carouses about they shall pass,
And each country swain trip about with his lass;
Meantime goes the caterer to fetch in the chief-
Plum-pudding, goose, capon, minced pies, and roast beef.

The cooks and the scullion, who toil in their frocks,
Their hopes do depend upon their Christmas-box ;
There are very few that do live on the earth
But enjoy at this time either profit or mirth ;
Yea, those that are charged to find all relief,
Plum-pudding, goose, capon, minced pies, and roast beef.

Then well may we welcome Old Christmas to town,
Who brings us good cheer, and good liquor so brown,
To pass the cold winter away with delight.
We feast it all day, and we frolic all night ;
Both hunger and cold we keep out with relief,
Plum-pudding, goose, capon, minced pies, and roast beef.

Then let all curmudgeons, who dote on their wealth,
And value their treasure much more than their health,
Go hang themselves up, if they will be so kind,
Old Christmas with them but small welcome shall find :
They will not afford to themselves, without grief,
Plum-pudding, goose, capon, minced pies, and roast beef.

WASSAILING FRUIT TREES.

The custom of Wassailing the fruit trees on the eve of Twelfth-day has been before alluded to. It seems to have been the practice, on the part of the Devonshire farmers, to proceed to their orchards in the evening, accompanied by their farm servants, and carrying with them a large pitcher or milk-pail filled with cyder, with roasted apples hissing therein. They forth with encircled one of the best bearing trees, and drunk the following toast three times. The remains of the wassailing liquor was then thrown against the trees, under the idea that a fruitful year would be the result.

[graphic]

“ HIERE 's to thee, old apple-tree,
Whence thou may'st bud, and thou may’st blow!
And whence thou may’st bear apples enow!

Ilats full! caps full!
Bushel—bushel-sacks full !
And my pockets full too! Huzza!”

[graphic]

Two out of the three subjoined Carols will be recognised as old familiar friends. Though in all probability more than a century and a-half old, they are the Carols of the People even at the present day, and, independent of their claim on this score, to be admitted into the present work, there is a pleasing simplicity about the one, and a quaintness pervading the other, sufficient to cause them to be admired in spite of their commonness.

GOD REST YOU, MERRY GENTLEMEN.

[graphic]

OD rest you, merry gentlemen,

Let nothing you dismay,
For Jesus Christ, our Saviour,

Was born upon this day ;
To save us all from Satan's power,

When we were gone astray.
O tidings of comfort and joy,

[Day. For Jesus Christ our Saviour was born on Christmas

In Bethlehem in Jewry

This blessed babe was born, And laid within a manger

Upon this blessed morn ; . The which his mother Mary Nothing did take in scorn.

O tidings, &c.

From God, our Heavenly Father,

A blessed Angel came, And, unto certain shepherds,

Brought tidings of the same; How, that in Bethlehem was born The Son of God by name.

O tidings, &c.

Fear not, then said the Angel,

Let nothing you affright,
This day is born a Saviour,

Of virtue, power, and might,
So frequently to vanquish all
The friends of Satan quite.

O tidings, &c.

The Shepherds at those tidings,

Rejoicèd much in mind, And left their flocks a-feeding

In tempest, storm, and wind, And went to Bethlehem straightway, This blessed Babe to find.

() tidings, &c.

But when to Bethlehem they came,

Where as this infant lay,

« AnteriorContinuar »