Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

CAROJ., WITH LULLABY.
They found Him in a manger

Where oxen feed on hay,
His mother Mary kneeling
Unto the Lord did pray.

O tidings, &c.

Now to the Lord sing praises,

All you within this place,
And with true love and brotherhood

Each other now embrace,
This holy tide of Christmas
All others doth deface.

O tidings, &c.

CAROL, WITH LULLABY.

LULLA, la lulla, lulla lullaby,

My sweet little baby, what meanest thou to cry? Be still, my blessed babe, though cause thou hast to mourn, Whose blood, most innocent, the cruel king hath sworn: And lo, alas, behold what slaughter he doth make, Shedding the blood of infants all, sweet Saviour, for thy sake: A king is born, they say, which king this king would kill; Oh wo, and woful heavy day, when wretches have their will.

Lulla, la lulla, lulla lullaby, &c. Three kings this King of kings to see, are come from far, To each unknown, with offerings great, by guiding of a star! And shepherds heard the song, which angels bright did sing, Giving all glory unto God, for coming of this king. Which must be made away, King Herod would him kill; Oh wo, and woful heavy day, when wretches have their will. Lulla, la lulla, lulla lullaby, &c. Lo, my little babe, be still, lament no more, From fury shalt thou step aside, help have we still in store ; We heavenly warning have, some other soil to seek, From death must fly the Lord of Life, as lamb both mild and

meek: Thus must my babe obey the king that would him kill, Oh wo, and woful heavy day, when wretches have their will.

Lulla, la lulla, lulla lullaby, &c. But thou shalt live and reign, as sybils have foresaid, As all the prophets prophesy, whose mother, yet a maid, And perfect virgin pure, with her breasts shall up-breed Both God and man, that all have made the son of heavenly

seed : Whom caitiffs none can ’tray, whom tyrants none can kill, Oh, joy, and joyful happy day, when wretches want their

will.

I SAW THREE SHIPS.

SAW three ships come sailing in

On Christmas Day, on Christmas Day; I saw three ships come sailing in,

On Christmas Day in the morning.

And what was in those ships all three,

On Christmas Day, on Christmas Day?
And what was in those ships all three,

On Christmas Day in the morning ?

:

TO

I SAW THREE SHIPS.

Our Saviour Christ and his ladye,

On Christmas Day, on Christmas Day; Our Saviour Christ and his ladye,

On Christmas Day in the morning.

Pray whither sailed those ships all three,

On Christmas Day, on Christmas Day? Pray whither sailed those ships all three,

On Christmas Day in the morning ?

O they sailed into Bethlehem,

On Christmas Day, on Christmas Day; O they sailed into Bethlehem,

On Christmas Day in the morning.

And all the bells on Earth shall ring,

On Christmas Day, on Christmas Day; And all the bells on Earth shall ring,

On Christmas Day in the morning.

And all the angels in Heaven shall sing,

On Christmas Day, on Christmas Day; And all the angels in Heaven shall sing,

On Christmas Day in the morning.

And all the souls on Earth shall sing,

On Christmas Day, on Christmas Day; And all the souls on Earth shall sing,

On Christmas Day in the morning.

Then let us all rejoice amain,

On Christmas Day, on Christmas Day; Then let us all rejoice amain,

On Christmas Day in the morning.

“* Ar Christmas time, send up the brawner's head,
Sweet rosemary and bays around it spread :
His foaming tusks let some large pippin grace,
Or, ʼmidst those thundering spears an orange place;
Sauce like himself, offensive to its foes,
The roguish mustard, dangerous to the nose.
Sack, and the well-spiced hippocras, the wine,
Wassail the bowl with ancient ribbands fine,
Porridge with plums, and turkeys with the chine."

WM KING.

DIVISION V.

CHRISTMAS VERSES OF THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY.

[graphic]

EW poems bearing reference to the Christmas festival appear to have been produced during that era of the revival of English literature, which, from the brilliant circle of writers it gave birth to, has acquired the epithet of Augustan. Yet, nevertheless, much of the old Christmas hospitality, and many of the old Christmas observances, that have been dwelt upon in preceding pages of this work, still lingered behind, in many a quiet country place, as though loth to depart; and, perhaps,

the picture which Addison sketched of 8 Coverley Hall at Christmas time* is as

faithful a representation of the hospi

tality practised by the country gentlemen

or of the period as can be met with. He tells to

us that “ Sir Roger de Coverley adopted the laudable custom of his ancestors, in keeping open house at Christmas. He had killed eight fat hogs for that season, had dealt about his chines very liberally amongst his neighbours, and, in particular, he had sent a string of hogs' puddings, with a pack of cards, to every poor family in the parish. I have often thought,' said Sir Roger, 'it happens very well that Christmas should fall out in the middle of winter. It is the most dead, uncomfortable time of the year, when the poor people would suffer very much from their poverty, and cold, if they had not good cheer, warm fires, and Christmas gambols to support them. I love to rejoice their poor hearts at this season, and to see the whole village merry in my great hall. I allow a double quantity of malt to my small beer, and set it a running for twelve days to every one that calls for it. 128

Spectator, No. 269, 1711.

THE APPROACH OF CHRISTMAS.

I have always a piece of cold beef, and a mince pie upon the table, and am wonderfully pleased to see my tenants pass away a whole evening in playing their tricks, and smutting one another.'” We learn from the same authority,* that one of the favourite Christmas gambols on such an occasion as that above described, was yawning for a Cheshire cheese. The proceeding generally began about midnight, when the whole company were disposed to be drowsy, and he that yawned the widest, and, at the same time, so naturally as to produce the most yawns among the spectators, was proclaimed the victor, and carried home the cheese as his reward.

[graphic][merged small][merged small]

When rosemary, and bays, the poets' crown,
Are bawled, in frequent cries, through all the town;
Then judge the festival of Christmas near,
Christmas, the joyous period of the year.

• Spectator, No. 179, 1711.

+ From “ Trivia, or the Art of Walking the Streets of London.”

« AnteriorContinuar »