A Familiar Exposition of the Constitution of the United States: Containing a Brief Commentary on Every Clause, Explaining the True Nature, Reasons, and Objects Thereof : Designed for the Use of School Libraries and General Readers : with an Appendix, Containing Important Public Documents, Illustrative of the Constitution

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The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd., 1999 - 372 páginas
Story, Joseph. A Familiar Exposition of the Constitution of the United States: Containing a Brief Commentary on Every Clause, Explaining the True Nature, reasons, and Objects Thereof; Designed for the Use of School, Libraries and General Readers. With an Appendix, Containing Important Public Documents, Illustrative of the Constitution. New York: Harper Brothers: 1865. 372 pp. Reprinted 1999 by The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd. LCCN 98-50811. ISBN 1-886363-71-4. Hardcover. * Reprint of the 1865 edition. An important treatise on the Constitution of the United States by an early master of that document. Designed to follow the order of his well-known Commentaries on the Constitution, this work is written in language geared to the student or layman, nevertheless showing great breadth and profundity in his explications.

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III
11
IV
17
V
22
VI
26
VII
28
VIII
33
IX
36
X
46
XXVII
137
XXVIII
142
XXIX
146
XXX
158
XXXI
170
XXXII
179
XXXIII
186
XXXIV
228

XI
50
XII
64
XIII
76
XIV
89
XV
90
XVI
96
XVII
101
XVIII
107
XIX
114
XX
117
XXI
119
XXII
122
XXIII
125
XXIV
128
XXV
131
XXVI
134
XXXV
242
XXXVI
244
XXXVII
248
XXXVIII
251
XXXIX
254
XL
267
XLI
271
XLII
275
XLIII
279
XLIV
289
XLV
306
XLVI
324
XLVII
329
XLVIII
339
XLIX
351
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Página 286 - United States, in Congress assembled, shall have authority to appoint a committee, to sit in the recess of Congress, to be denominated a "Committee of the States," and to consist of one delegate from each State; and to appoint such other committees and civil officers as may be necessary for managing the general affairs of the United States under their direction; to appoint one of their number to preside: provided, that no person be allowed to serve in the office of President more than one year in...
Página 279 - The better to secure and perpetuate mutual friendship and intercourse among the people of the different States in this Union, the free inhabitants of each of these states, paupers, vagabonds and fugitives from justice excepted, shall be entitled to all privileges and immunities of free citizens in the several states...
Página 282 - ... united states in congress assembled can be consulted nor shall any state grant commissions to any ships or vessels of war, nor letters of marque or reprisal, except it be after a declaration of war by the united states in congress assembled, and then only against the kingdom or state and the subjects thereof, against which war has been...
Página 288 - Every State shall abide by the determinations of the United States in Congress assembled, on all questions which by this Confederation are submitted to them. And the articles of this Confederation shall be inviolably observed by every State, and the union shall be perpetual...
Página 319 - ... appearances of a virtuous sense of obligation, a commendable deference for public opinion, or a laudable zeal for public good, the base or foolish compliances of ambition, corruption or infatuation. As avenues to foreign influence in innumerable ways, such attachments are particularly alarming to the truly enlightened and independent patriot.
Página 318 - The Nation, which indulges towards another an habitual hatred, or an habitual fondness, is in some degree a slave. It is a slave to its animosity or to its affection, either of which is sufficient to lead it astray from its duty and its interest. Antipathy in one nation against another...
Página 311 - These considerations speak a persuasive language to every reflecting and virtuous mind and exhibit the continuance of the Union as a primary object of patriotic desire. Is there a doubt whether a common government can embrace so large a sphere? Let experience solve it. To listen to mere speculation in such a case were criminal. We are authorized to hope that a proper organization of the whole, with the auxiliary agency of governments for the respective subdivisions will afford a happy issue to the...

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