A history of Greece ... to the Roman conquest

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Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge, 1856 - 436 páginas

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Página 116 - Persians' grave, I could not deem myself a slave. A king sate on the rocky brow Which looks o'er sea-born Salamis ; And ships, by thousands, lay below, And men in nations ; — all were his ! He counted them at break of day — And when the sun set, where were they ? And where are they, and where art thou, My country?
Página 112 - Of those who at Thermopylae were slain, Glorious the doom, and beautiful the lot; Their tomb an altar : men from tears refrain To honour them, and praise, but mourn them not. Such sepulchre nor drear decay, Nor all-destroying time shall waste; this right have they. Within their grave the home-bred glory Of Greece was laid; this witness gives Leonidas the Spartan, in whose story A wreath of famous virtue ever lives."f § 16.
Página 77 - I'll wreath my sword in myrtle bough, The sword that laid the tyrant low, When patriots, burning to be free, To Athens gave equality. " Harmodius, hail! though reft of breath, Thou ne'er shalt feel the stroke of death! The heroes' happy isles shall be The bright abode allotted thee.
Página 254 - Wind, gentle evergreen, to form a shade Around the tomb where Sophocles is laid ; Sweet ivy wind thy boughs, and intertwine With blushing roses and the clustering vine : Thus will thy lasting leaves with beauties hung, Prove grateful emblems of the lays he sung ; Whose soul, exalted like a god of wit, Among the Muses and the Graces writ.
Página 103 - The mountains look on Marathon— And Marathon looks on the sea ; And musing there an hour alone, I dream'd that Greece might still be free ; For standing on the Persian's grave, I could not deem myself a slave. A...
Página 81 - Homer's birth-place; but when you expect to meet with that common story, the poet slides by, and raises the whole world for a kind of arbiter, which is to end the contention amongst its several parts. On Anacreon, by Antipater.
Página 77 - The heroes' happy isles shall be The bright abode allotted thee. " I'll wreathe my sword in myrtle bough, The sword that laid Hipparchus low, When at Athena's adverse fane He knelt, and never rose again. " While Freedom's name is understood, You shall delight the wise and good ; You dared to set your country free, And gave her laws equality.
Página 81 - Archedice, the daughter of King Hippias, Who in his time Of all the potentates of Greece was prime, This dust doth hide. Daughter, wife, sister, mother unto kings she was, Yet free from pride.
Página 74 - The Muses, Hesiod, on the mountain steep, Themselves at noon thy flocks beheld thee keep. The bright-leaved bay they pluck'd, and all the Nine Placed in thy hand at once the branch divine. Then their own Helicon's inspiring wave, From where the wing'd steed smote the ground, they gave, Which deeply quaff'd, thy verse the lineage told Of gods, of husbandry, and heroes old.
Página 112 - ... doom, and beautiful the lot ; Their tomb an altar : men from tears refrain To honor them, and praise, but mourn them not. Such sepulchre, nor drear decay Nor all-destroying time shall waste ; this right have they. Within their grave the home-bred glory Of Greece was laid ; this witness gives Leonidas the Spartan, in whose story . A wreath of famous virtue ever lives.

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