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A IL holy Light, ofspring of Heav'n first-born,

L 11 Or of th’Eternal coeternal beam May I express thee" unblam'd? fince God is light,

And Horace advises a poet to con- reader, I imagin, cannot with it sider thoroughly the nature and were omitted. One is even pleased force of his genius. Milton seems with a fault, if it be a fault, that to have known perfectly well, is the occasion of so many beauties, wherein his strength lay, and has and acquaints us so much with the therefore chosen a subject entirely circumstances and character of the conformable to tbore talents, of author. which he was master. As his ge- 2. Or of th' eternal coeternal beam nius was wonderfully turned to the May I express thee' unblam'd? ] fublime, his subject is the nobleft Or may I without blame call thee, that could have entered into the the coeternal beam of the eternal thoughts of man. Every thing God: The Ancients were very that is truly great and astonishing cautious and curious by what names has a place in it. The whole system they address’d their deities, and Milof the intellectual world; the Chaos ton in imitation of them questions and the Creation; Heaven, Earth, whether he fhould address the Light and Hell, enter into the conftitu, as the first-born of Heaven, or as tion of his poem. Having in the the coeternal beam of the eternal firft and second books represented Father, or as a pure ethereal the infernal world with all its hor- stream whose fountain is unknown: rors, the thread of his fable natu- But as the second appellation seems rally leads him into the opposit re- to ascribe a proper eternity to gions of bliss and glory. Addifon. Light, Milton very justly doubts

1. Hail boly Light, &c.] Our au- whether he might use that without thor's address to Light, and lamen- blame. tation of his own blindness may 3. fince God is light, perbaps be censur'd as an excre. And -- in unapproached light Icence or digreffion not agreeable Dwelt From 1 John I. si to the rules of epic poetry; but God is light, and in bim is no dark. yet this is so charming a part of efs at all. And 1 Tim. VI. 16. the poem, that the moft critical Who only bath immortality, dwelling

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L AIL holy Light, ofspring of Heav'n first-born,
I1 Or of th’Eternal coeternal beam
May I express thee" unblam’d? fince God is light,

And

Horace advises a poet to con- reader, I imagin, cannot wish it sider thoroughly the nature and were omitted. One is even pleased force of his genius. Milton seems with a fault, if it be a fault, that to have known perfectly well, is the occasion of so many beauties, wherein his strength lay, and has and acquaints us so much with the therefore chosen a subject entirely circumstances and character of the conformable to those talents, of author. which he was master. As his ge- 2. Or of th' eternal coeternal beam nius was wonderfully turned to the May I express thee unblam'd? ] sublime, his subject is the noblet Or may I without blame call thee, that could have entered into the the coeternal beam of the eternal thoughts of man. Every thing God? The Ancients were very that is truly great and astonishing cautious and curious by what names has a place in it. The whole system they address’d their deities, and Milof the intellectual world, the Chaos ton in imitation of them questions and the Creation; Heaven, Earth, whether he should address the Light and Hell, enter into the conftitu, as the first-born of Heaven, or as tion of his poem. Having in the the coeternal beam of the eternal first and second books represented Father, or as a pure ethereal the infernal world with all its hor- ftream whose fountain is unknown: rors, the thread of his fable natu. But as the second appellation seems rally leads him into the opposit re- to ascribe a proper eternity to gions of bliss and glory. Addison. Light, Milton very justly doubts

1. Hail boly Light, &c.] Our au- whether he might use that without thor's address to Light, and lamen- blame. tation of his own blindness may 3. fince God is light, perhaps be cenfur'd as an excre And - in unapproached light Icence or digreflion not agreeable Dwelt ) From 1 John 1.si to the rules of epic poetry; but God is light, and in bim is no darkyet this is so charming a part of ess at all. And 1 Tim. VI. 16. the poem, that the most critical Who only bath immortality, dwelling

- And never but in unapproached light
Dwelt from eternity, dwelt then in thee, 5
Bright effluence of bright essence increate.
Or hear'st thou rather pure ethereal stream,
Whose fountain who shall tell? before the fun,..
Before the Heav'ns thou wert, and at the voice
Of God, as with a mantle didft invest 10
The rising world of waters dark and deep,
Won from the void and formless infinite.
Thee I re-visit now with bolder wing,

Escap'd in the light, which no man can ap- 19. Where is the way where light proach unto, 6. Bright effiuence of bright effence 11. The rising world of waters

increate.] What the Wisdom dark and deep,] For the world of Solomon says of Wisdom, he was only in a state of fluidity, when applies to Light, VII. 25, 26. She the light was created; as Moses is a pure influence flowing from the says, The Spirit of God moved upon glory of the Almighty, he is the the face of the waters ; and God brightness of the everlasting light. said Let tbere be light, and tbere was

. Or hear'f thou rather] Or light, Gen. I. 2, 3. And this verse doit thou rather hear this address, of Milton, dost thou delight rather to be callid, The rifing world of waters dark pure ethereal ftream ? An excellent and deep, Latinism, as Dr. Bentley obseryes, is plainly formed upon this of SpenHor. Sat. II. VI. 20.

ser, Fairy Queen. B. 1. C. 1. St. 39. Matutine pater feu Jane liben. And through the world of waters tius audis ?

wide and deep. And we have an expression of the

the 12. Won from the void and formsame kind in Spenser, Fairy Queen,

lefs infinite.) Void must not here be

Elly understood as emptiness, for Chaos B. s. Cant. 5. St. 23.

is described full of matter ; but If old Aveugle's sons fo evil hear: void, as deftitute of any form'd Whole fountain who shall tell ? As the being, void as the earth was when question is ak'd in Job XXXVIII. first created. What Moses says of

that

dwelleth ?"

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