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New Electrical Engineering Building of the Worcester Polytechnic Institute,” by Harold B. Smith, Professor of Electrical Engineering, and Arthur W. French, Professor of Civil Engineering, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, was read by title.

The next papers read were one on "The Organization and Conduct of an Electrical Engineering Laboratory,” by John W. Schuster, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering, University of Wisconsin; and one on “Central Station Design," by Albert A. Radtke, Professor of Electrical Engineering, Armour Institute of Technology. These papers were discussed by Professors Radtke, Brackett, F. C. Caldwell, Wood, Dates and M. Brooks.

Professors Schuster and Radtke closed the discussion.

A paper on "The Basic Principles in the Construction of a Textbook," by Stephen E. Slocum, Professor of Applied Mathematics, University of Cincinnati, in the absence of the author, was read by the secretary. It was discussed by Professors Franklin and Magruder.

The next paper was on “Methods of Studying Current Technical Literature," by Henry H. Norris, Professor of Electrical Engineering, Cornell University. In the absence of Prof. Norris, his paper was read by the Secretary. It was discussed by Professors White, Brackett and Chatburn.

The last paper of this session described “The Building and Equipment of the Rockefeller Physical Laboratory of the Case School of Applied Science.” It was presented by Professor Dayton C. Miller, Professor of Physics, Case School of Applied Science. The reading of the paper was followed by a series of demonstrations of the apparatus of the lecture room in which the meeting was held, after which the visiting members inspected the building and apparatus.

TUESDAY, JULY 2, 1907.

MORNING SESSION, 9:30 O'CLOCK. The applications of certain persons having been approved by the Council, on motion they were duly elected members of the Society. (See page 22.)

The first paper presented at this session was entitled “The Six-day System at the University of Minnesota," by Frank H. Constant Professor of Structural Engineering, University of Minnesota. It was followed by one descriptive of “The Work of the Freshman and Sophomore Years of the Engineering Courses,” by Fred A. Fish, Professor of Electrical Engineering, Iowa State College. These papers were discussed by Professors Kenyon, C. M. Woodward, Schuster, F. C. Caldwell, W. G. Raymond, Cooley, Williston, W. Kent, Turneaure, Magruder, Bass, C. Russ Richards, Brackett, Webb and D. C. Jackson. The discussion was closed by the authors.

A paper on “A Combined Cultural and Technical Engineering Course” was read by the author, George R. Chatburn, Professor of Applied Mechanics and Machine Design, University of Nebraska. It was followed by one entitled “Technical Education with a View to Training for Leadership,” by Fred W. Atkinson, President of the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn. In the absence of President Atkinson, the last-named paper was read by the Secretary. They were discussed by Professors Rowland, the Secretary, W. Kent, Goetze, C. S. Howe, F. C. Caldwell, C. M. Woodward, Haupt, Franklin, Constant, W. G. Raymond, D. C. Jackson, Cooley and Williston. The discussion was closed by Professor Chatburn.

AFTERNOON SESSION, 1:30 O'CLOCK.

The first paper of the afternoon session was entitled “The Functions of the Dean of a College of Engineering,” by Frederick E. Turneaure, Dean of the College of Engineering, University of Wisconsin. This was followed by one descriptive of "The Duties and Work of the Dean in a College of Engineering,” by James M. White, Professor of Architectural Engineering and Dean of the Engineering College, University of Illinois; and another entitled “Some Phases in the Organization of State Universities,” by Louis E. Reber, Dean of the School of Engineering and Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Pennsylvania State College. In the absence of Professor Reber, his paper was read by Professor A. J. Wood.

In the absence of their authors, the papers by Henry B. Ward, Corresponding Secretary of the Society of the Sigma Xi, on “The Part of Sigma Xi in Scientific Education,” the paper by Edward H. Williams, Jr., Founder of the Tau Beta Pi Association, on “The Place of the Intercollegiate Scientific Fraternity in an Engineering College,” and the paper by R. C. Matthews, Secretary of the Tau Beta Pi

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Association, on “The Tau Beta Pi Association,” were read by title.

The next paper was entitled “A Course in Physics for Engineering Students,” by William S. Franklin, Professor of Physics, Lehigh University. It was followed by one on “The Teaching of Elementary Mechanics,” by William S. Franklin, Professor of Physics, and by Barry MacNutt, Assistant Professor of Physics, Lehigh University. They were read by Professor Franklin. The papers were discussed by Professors Merriman, Cooley, W. Kent, Williston, Maurer, Haupt, A. N. Talbot, Howe, Chatburn, Emory, F. C. Caldwell, Benjamin, Miller, C. R. Adams, Jr., C. M. Woodward and Brackett. Professor Franklin closed the discussion.

TUESDAY AFTERNOON, 4 o'CLOCK. The members of the Society adjourned the afternoon session at four o'clock to attend a reception tendered to them and their ladies by the Ladies of the Faculty of the Case School of Applied Science. The reception was held in the library of the Physical Laboratory. It was a delightful occasion, charmingly informal and was enjoyed by all. The only disappointment was that so few of the visiting members were accompanied by their wives. The hearty and united hospitality of the ladies of the faculty of Case School is worthy of emulation. It is felt that to know a member in the sessions of the meeting may be to know something of his mental powers, but to know the whole man, one must also meet him socially.

EVENING SESSION, 7 O'CLOCK. In the evening the Trustees and Faculty of the Case School, not to be outdone by the ladies, entertained the members of the Society at dinner at the University Club.

Both of the social functions tendered the visitors are worthy of commendation, as examples. President Howe acted as toastmaster. Post-prandial remarks were made by the Hon. J. M. Henderson, Esq., President of the Board of Trustees, and by Mr. Worcester R. Warner, member of the Board of Trustees of the Case School.

President Jackson delivered the presidential address, entitled “The Relation of the Engineering Schools to Polytechnic Industrial Education.” It was discussed by Professors Henry T. Eddy, C. M. Woodward, Williston, Franklin, Goetze, White, Turneaure and Mr. Warner. President Jackson closed the discussion.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 3, 1907.

MORNING SESSION, 9:30 O'CLOCK. The applications of certain persons having been approved by the Council, on motion they were duly elected members of the Society. (See page 22.)

The first paper read at this session was on “The Cooperative Course in Engineering at the University of Cincinnati.” It was read by the author, Herman Schneider, Professor of Civil Engineering and Dean of the College of Engineering, University of Cincinnati. It was followed by one on the same subject by

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