The War Power After 200 Years: Congress and the President at a Constitutional Impasse : Hearings Before the Special Subcommittee on War Powers of the Committee on Foreign Relations, United States Senate, One Hundredth Congress, Second Session, July 13, 14, August 5, September 7, 15, 16, 20, 23 and 29, 1988

Portada
 

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

No encontramos ningún comentario en los lugares habituales.

Otras ediciones - Ver todas

Términos y frases comunes

Pasajes populares

Página 408 - Our Constitution declares a treaty to be the law of the land. It is consequently to be regarded in courts of justice as equivalent to an act of the legislature whenever it operates of itself without the aid of any legislative provision.
Página 693 - The President is the sole organ of the nation in its external relations, and its sole representative with foreign nations.
Página 511 - Some men look at constitutions with sanctimonious reverence, and deem them, like the ark of the covenant, too sacred to be touched. They ascribe to the men of the preceding age a wisdom more than human, and suppose what they did to be beyond amendment.
Página 825 - It would amount to nothing more than the supreme command and direction of the military and naval forces, as first general and admiral of the Confederacy; while that of the British king extends to the declaring of war and to the raising and regulating of fleets and armies — all which, by the Constitution under consideration, would appertain to the legislature.
Página 468 - The Parties agree that an armed attack against one or more of them in Europe or North America shall be considered an attack against them all ; and consequently they agree that, if such an armed attack occurs, each of them, in exercise of the right of individual or collective...
Página 293 - When the President takes measures incompatible with the expressed or implied will of Congress, his power is at its lowest ebb, for then he can rely only upon his own constitutional powers minus any constitutional powers of Congress over the matter.
Página 711 - ... that the legislative, executive, and judiciary powers ought to be kept as separate from and independent of each other as the nature of a free government will admit, or as is consistent with that chain of connection that binds the whole fabric of the Constitution in one indissoluble bond of unity and amity.
Página 405 - It is obvious that there may be matters of the sharpest exigency for the national well being that an act of Congress could not deal with but that a treaty followed by such an act could, and it is not lightly to be assumed that, in matters requiring national action, "a power which must belong to and somewhere reside in every civilized government
Página 657 - And you are to observe and follow such orders and directions from time to time as you shall receive from this or a future Congress...
Página 341 - Forces into hostilities, or into situations where imminent involvement in hostilities is clearly indicated by the circumstances, and to the continued use of such forces in hostilities or in such situations.

Información bibliográfica