Areopagitica

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ReadHowYouWant.com, 2006 - 80 páginas
This prose-work is one of the classics that encapsulates Milton's speech for the liberty of unlicensed printing to the parliament of England. Milton has squabbled against the Licensing order of 1643. The book is a significant philosophical defense of the liberated and emancipated speech and stands apart in the annals of history. Worth-read and timeless!
 

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Contenido

Sección 1
1
Sección 2
8
Sección 3
13
Sección 4
14
Sección 5
16
Sección 6
39
Sección 7
47
Sección 8
49
Sección 9
50
Sección 10
57
Sección 11
67
Sección 12
71
Sección 13
72
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Acerca del autor (2006)

John Milton, English scholar and classical poet, is one of the major figures of Western literature. He was born in 1608 into a prosperous London family. By the age of 17, he was proficient in Latin, Greek, and Hebrew. Milton attended Cambridge University, earning a B.A. and an M.A. before secluding himself for five years to read, write and study on his own. It is believed that Milton read evertything that had been published in Latin, Greek, and English. He was considered one of the most educated men of his time. Milton also had a reputation as a radical. After his own wife left him early in their marriage, Milton published an unpopular treatise supporting divorce in the case of incompatibility. Milton was also a vocal supporter of Oliver Cromwell and worked for him. Milton's first work, Lycidas, an elegy on the death of a classmate, was published in 1632, and he had numerous works published in the ensuing years, including Pastoral and Areopagitica. His Christian epic poem, Paradise Lost, which traced humanity's fall from divine grace, appeared in 1667, assuring his place as one of the finest non-dramatic poet of the Renaissance Age. Milton went blind at the age of 43 from the incredible strain he placed on his eyes. Amazingly, Paradise Lost and his other major works, Paradise Regained and Samson Agonistes, were composed after the lost of his sight. These major works were painstakingly and slowly dictated to secretaries. John Milton died in 1674.

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