The Life and Confessions of a Black Studies Teacher: God's Mercy Found this Trembling Soul

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BYE Publishing Services, 2002 - 350 páginas
The Life and Confessions of a Black Studies Teacher is a poignant account of the experiences of a Black female growing up in the segregated South. Arrington describes how she overcome poverty and racism to be selected by The Black Panther Party to head the first Black studies in Oakland, CA. She discusses techniques to assist African American teachers with developing a curriculum that addresses the unique academic needs of inner city Blacks. She provides the reader with reasons why it is important to maintain Ethnic Studies as a separate department.
 

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Crítica de los usuarios - Marcar como inadecuado

Amazing book I learnt a lot

Crítica de los usuarios - Marcar como inadecuado

I have only read a small portion of this book and I am grateful. Much of what the Black citizens of this country has done has been buried from sight. History has changed what we have contributed and assigned credited to the majority race. If what we have contributed is not passed down to our posterity, we are doomed to return to the shadows. 

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Contenido

In Memoriam
8
Chapter One Demopolis Alabama
21
Chapter Two The Arrington Family
49
Chapter Three My Mother Stella Collins Arrington
67
Chapter Four My Father Dred Scott Arrington
93
Chapter Five Southern Public Schools
107
Chapter Six Religion and the Black Church
129
Chapter Seven From Alabama State College
145
Chapter Nine Dr Huey Newton the Black
171
Chapter Ten The First Black Studies Program
187
Chapter Eleven Instruction Techniques
197
Chapter Twelve The Survival of Black Studies
241
Chapter Thirteen Notes on Black Nationalism
253
Chapter Fourteen Message to Black Men
269
Chapter Fifteen Message to Black Women
307
Bibliography
341

Chapter Eight California Living
161

Términos y frases comunes

Acerca del autor (2002)

Dr. Cecelia L. Hatshepsut Arrington is the former chairperson of the Ethnic Studies Department at Merritt College in Oakland, California. She received a National Endowment for the Humanities grant to study Black history at the University of California, Berkeley, at Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois, and at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She received her doctorate in curriculum and instruction, with emphasis on Black studies, from Western Colorado University.

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