Goodly is Our Heritage: Children's Literature, Empire, and the Certitude of Character

Portada
Scarecrow Press, 2004 - 341 páginas
"Colonialism, simply stated, is the exploitation of a weaker country by a stronger one. Although it tends to come about through force, its perpetuation is highly reliant on its ability to sustain a belief system consistent with an imperialist agenda. From the bedtime story to the movie screen, children's literature has proven a durable and enduring vehicle for such beliefs." "Singh takes her title from Rudyard Kipling's famous poem "A Song of the English," a work of unabashed moral and imperial patriotism. She provides a most persuasive argument for why these sentiments are both insidious and compelling and how they resonate to this day. Although she includes such classic examples at The Secret Garden, Robinson Crusoe, and the Babar series, her analysis of genuinely neglected fiction lends a special richness. Singh demonstrates how constructions of character evolve into cultural imprints that encourage their young readers to choose the "goodly" side ... with little thought of "badly" repercussions."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved
 

Comentarios de la gente - Escribir un comentario

No encontramos ningún comentario en los lugares habituales.

Contenido

Prologue
xi
Introduction
xxxv
Foundations
1
Fundamentals
67
Touchstones
113
The Blyton Books
199
Across the Atlantic
245
Epilogue
293
Bibliography
317
Index
331
About the Author
Derechos de autor

Términos y frases comunes

Referencias a este libro

Irvine Welsh
Robert Morace
Vista de fragmentos - 2007

Acerca del autor (2004)

Rashna B Singh is a visiting professor at Colorado College and the author of The Imperishable Empire: British Fiction on India (1988), as well as numerous scholarly articles and conference papers on issues in British colonial and postcolonial literature.
In 2003 Dr. Singh was awarded a grant by the National Endowment for the Humanities to participate in a seminar at Oxford University and in 1998 she was chosen by the Massachusetts Council of International Education to lecture on "Perceptions and Representations of the Other" at various colleges in the state.

Información bibliográfica